• The Circumgalactic Medium (CGM) of late-type galaxies is characterized using UV spectroscopy of 11 targeted QSO/galaxy pairs at z < 0.02 with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and ~60 serendipitous absorber/galaxy pairs at z < 0.2 with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. CGM warm cloud properties are derived, including volume filling factors of 3-5%, cloud sizes of 0.1-30 kpc, masses of 10-1e8 solar masses and metallicities of 0.1-1 times solar. Almost all warm CGM clouds within 0.5 virial radii are metal-bearing and many have velocities consistent with being bound, "galactic fountain" clouds. For galaxies with L > 0.1 L*, the total mass in these warm CGM clouds approaches 1e10 solar masses, ~10-15% of the total baryons in massive spirals and comparable to the baryons in their parent galaxy disks. This leaves >50% of massive spiral-galaxy baryons "missing". Dwarfs (<0.1 L*) have smaller area covering factors and warm CGM masses (<5% baryon fraction), suggesting that many of their warm clouds escape. Constant warm cloud internal pressures as a function of impact parameter ($P/k ~ 10 cm^{-3} K) support the inference that previous COS detections of broad, shallow O VI and Ly-alpha absorptions are of an extensive (~400-600 kpc), hot (T ~ 1e6 K) intra-cloud gas which is very massive (>1e11 solar masses). While the warm CGM clouds cannot account for all the "missing baryons" in spirals, the hot intra-group gas can, and could account for ~20% of the cosmic baryon census at z ~ 0 if this hot gas is ubiquitous among spiral groups.
  • We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (dv \sim 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad (dv \sim 10 -- 20 x 10^3 km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise (> 40 per resolution element) broad LyA emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at \lambda > 1350A can be explained by HI 2-photon emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of NV \lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and we present the first detections of broad HeII \lambda1640, CIV \lambda1550, and NIV] \lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The NV/H-alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T_{e}/T_{p} \approx 0.14 - 0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance ratio may have been stratified prior to the ring expulsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expulsion of the circumstellar ring.
  • The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F_lambda ~ 1.0E10-14 ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.
  • Thermally-broadened Lya absorbers (BLAs) offer an alternate method to using highly-ionized metal absorbers (OVI, OVII, etc.) to probe the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM, T=10^5-10^7 K). Until now, WHIM surveys via BLAs have been no less ambiguous than those via far-UV and X-ray metal-ion probes. Detecting these weak, broad features requires background sources with a well-characterized far-UV continuum and data of very high quality. However, a recent HST/COS observation of the z=0.03 blazar Mrk421 allows us to perform a metal-independent search for WHIM gas with unprecedented precision. The data have high signal-to-noise (S/N~50 per ~20 km/s resolution element) and the smooth, power-law blazar spectrum allows a fully-parametric continuum model. We analyze the Mrk421 sight line for BLA absorbers, particularly for counterparts to the proposed OVII WHIM systems reported by Nicastro et al. (2005a,b) based on Chandra/LETG observations. We derive the Lya profiles predicted by the X-ray observations. The signal-to-noise ratio of the COS data is high (S/N~25 per pixel), but much higher S/N can be obtained by binning the data to widths characteristic of the expected BLA profiles. With this technique, we are sensitive to WHIM gas over a large (N_H, T) parameter range in the Mrk421 sight line. We rule out the claimed Nicastro et al. OVII detections at their nominal temperatures (T~1-2x10^6 K) and metallicities (Z=0.1 Z_sun) at >2 sigma level. However, WHIM gas at higher temperatures and/or higher metallicities is consistent with our COS non-detections.
  • The far-ultraviolet (FUV) channel of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is designed to operate between 1130{\AA} and 1850{\AA}, limited at shorter wavelengths by the reflectivity of the MgF2 protected aluminum reflective surfaces on the Optical Telescope Assembly and on the COS FUV diffraction gratings. However, because the detector for the FUV channel is windowless, it was recognized early in the design phase that there was the possibility that COS would retain some sensitivity at shorter wavelengths due to the first surface reflection from the MgF2 coated optics. Preflight testing of the flight spare G140L grating revealed ~5% efficiency at 1066{\AA}, and early on-orbit observations verified that the COS G140L/1230 mode was sensitive down to at least the Lyman limit with 10-20 cm^2 effective area between 912{\AA} and 1070{\AA}, and rising rapidly to over 1000 cm2 beyond 1150{\AA}. Following this initial work we explored the possibility of using the G130M grating out of band to provide coverage down to 900{\AA}. We present calibration results and ray trace simulations for these observing modes and explore additional configurations that have the potential to increase spectroscopic resolution, signal to noise, and observational efficiency below 1130{\AA}.
  • We have used the Hubble/STIS and FUSE archives of ultraviolet spectra of bright AGN to identify intergalactic Lya absorbers in nearby (z < 0.1) voids. From a parent sample of 651 Lya absorbers, we identified 61 void absorbers located more than 1.4/h_70 Mpc from the nearest L* or brighter galaxy. Searching for metal absorption in high-quality (S/N > 10) spectra at the location of three diagnostic metal lines (O VI 1032, C IV 1548, Si III 1206), we detected no metal lines in any individual absorber, or in any group of absorbers using pixel co-addition techniques. The best limits on metal-line absorption in voids were set using four strong Lya absorbers with N(H I) > 10^{14} cm^-2, with 3-sigma equivalent-width limits ranging from 8 mA (O VI), 7-15 mA (C IV), and 4-10 mA (Si III). Photoionization modeling yields metallicity limits Z < 10^{-1.8+/-0.4} Z_sun, from non-detections of C IV and O VI, some 6 times lower than those seen in Lya and OVI absorbers at z < 0.1. Although the void Lya absorbers could be pristine material, considerably deeper spectra are required to rule out a universal metallicity floor produced by bursts of early star formation, with no subsequent star formation in the voids. The most consistent conclusion derived from these low-z results, and similar searches at z = 3-5, is that galaxy filaments have increased their mean IGM metallicity by factors of 30-100 since z = 3.
  • We combine a FUSE sample of OVI absorbers (z < 0.15) with a database of 1.07 million galaxy redshifts to explore the relationship between absorbers and galaxy environments. All 37 absorbers with N(OVI) > 10^{13.2} cm^-2 lie within 800 h_70^-1 kpc of the nearest galaxy, with no compelling evidence for OVI absorbers in voids. The OVI absorbers often appear to be associated with environments of individual galaxies. Gas with 10 +/- 5% of solar metallicity (OVI and CIII) has a median spread in distance of 350-500 kpc around L* galaxies and 200-270 kpc around 0.1 L* galaxies (ranges reflect uncertain metallicities of gas undetected in Lya absorption). In order to match the OVI line frequency, dN/dz = 20 for N(OVI) > 10^{13.2} cm^-2, galaxies with L < 0.1 L* must contribute to the cross section. The Lya absorbers with N(HI) > 10^{13.2} cm^-2 cover ~50% of the surface area of typical galaxy filaments. Two-thirds of these show OVI and/or CIII absorption, corresponding to a 33-50% covering factor at 0.1 Z_sun and suggesting that metals are spread to a maximum distance of 800 kpc, within typical galaxy supercluster filaments. Approximately 50% of the OVI absorbers have associated Lya line pairs with separations Delta V = 50-200 km/s. These pairs could represent shocks at the speeds necessary to create copious OVI, located within 100 kpc of the nearest galaxy and accounting for much of the two-point correlation function of low-z Lya forest absorbers.
  • We describe our surveys of low column density Lyman-alpha absorbers [N(HI) = 10^(12.5-16.0) cm^-2], which show that the warm photoionized IGM contains 30% of all baryons at z < 0.1. This fraction is consistent with cosmological simulations, which also predict that an additional 20-40% of the baryons reside in hotter 10^(5-7) K gas, the warm-hot IGM (WHIM). The observed line density of Lya absorbers, dN/dz = 170 for N(HI) > 10^(12.8) cm^-2, is dominated by low-N(HI) systems that exhibit slower redshift evolution than those with N(HI) >10^(14). HST/FUSE surveys of OVI absorbers, together with recent detections of O VII with Chandra and XMM/Newton, suggest that 20-70% of all baryons could reside in the WHIM, depending on its assumed abundance (O/H = 10% solar). At the highest column densities, N(HI) > 10^(20.3), the damped Lya systems are often identified with gas-rich disks of galaxies over a large range in luminosities (0.03-1 L*) and morphologies. Lyman-limit systems [N(HI) = 10^(17.3-20.3)] appear to be associated with bound, bright (0.1-0.3 L*) galaxy halos. The Lya absorbers with N(HI) = 10^(13-16) cm^-2 are associated with filaments of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution, although some may arise in unbound winds from dwarf galaxies. Our discovery that ~20% of low-z Lya absorbers reside in galaxy voids suggests that a substantial fraction of baryons may be entirely unrelated to galaxies. In the future, Hubble (and FUSE) can provide a census of the local baryons and the distribution of heavy elements in the IGM. These studies can be conducted quite efficiently if NASA can install the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on Hubble, allowing an order-of-magnitude improvement in throughput and a comparable increase in our ability to study the IGM.
  • We present HST STIS/G140M spectra of 15 extragalactic targets, which we combine with GHRS/G160M data to examine the statistical properties of the low-z Ly-alpha forest. We evaluate the physical properties of these Ly-alpha absorbers and compare them to their high-z counterparts. We determine that the warm, photoionized IGM contains 29+/-4% of the total baryon inventory at z = 0. We derive the distribution in column density, N_HI^(1.65+/-0.07) for 12.5 < log [N_HI] < 14.5, breaking to a flatter slope above log [N_HI] > 14.5. The slowing of the number density evolution of high-W Ly-alpha clouds is not as great as previously measured, and the break to slower evolution may occur later than previously suggested (z~1.0 rather than 1.6). We find a 7.2sigma excess in the two-point correlation function (TPCF) of Ly-alpha absorbers for velocity separations less than 260 km/s, which is exclusively due to the higher column density clouds. From our previous result that higher column density Ly-alpha clouds cluster more strongly with galaxies, this TPCF suggests a physical difference between the higher and lower column density clouds in our sample.
  • In this paper, we use large-angle, nearby galaxy redshift surveys to investigate the relationship between the 81 low-redshift Lya absorbers in our HST/GHRS survey and galaxies, superclusters, and voids. In a subsample of 46 Lya absorbers located in regions where the February 8, 2000 CfA catalog is complete down to at least L* galaxies, the nearest galaxy neighbors range from 100kpc to >10 Mpc. Of these 46 absorbers, 8 are found in galaxy voids. After correcting for pathlength and sensitivity, we find that 22+-8% of the Lya absorbers lie in voids, which requires that at least some low-column density absorbers are not extended halos of individual bright galaxies. The number density of these clouds yields a baryon fraction of 4.5+-1.5% in voids. The stronger Lya absorbers (10^{13.2-15.4} cm^-2) cluster with galaxies more weakly than galaxies cluster with each other, while the weaker absorbers (10^{12.4-13.2} cm^-2) are more randomly distributed. The median distance from a low-z Lya absorber in our sample to its nearest galaxy neighbor (~500 kpc) is twice the median distance between bright galaxies in the same survey volume. This makes any purposed "association" between these Lya absorbers and individual galaxies problematic. The suggested correlation between Lya absorber equivalent width (W) and nearest-galaxy impact parameter does not extend to W<200mA, or to impact parameters >200kpc. Instead, we find statistical support for the contention that absorbers align with large-scale filaments of galaxies. While some strong (W>400mA) Lya absorbers may be gas in the extended gaseous halos of individual galaxies, much of the local Lya "forest" appears to be associated with the large-scale structures of galaxies and some with voids.
  • We present HST GHRS and STIS observations of five QSOs that probe the prominent high-velocity cloud (HVC) Complex C, covering 10% of the northern sky. Based upon a single sightline measurement (Mrk 290), a metallicity [S/H]=-1.05+/-0.12 has been associated with Complex C by Wakker et al. (1999a,b). When coupled with its inferred distance (5<d<30 kpc) and line-of-sight velocity (v=-100 to -200 km/s), Complex C appeared to represent the first direct evidence for infalling low-metallicity gas onto the Milky Way, which could provide the bulk of the fuel for star formation in the Galaxy. We have extended the abundance analysis of Complex C to encompass five sightlines. We detect SII absorption in three targets (Mrk 290, Mrk 817, and Mrk 279); the resulting [SII/HI] values range from -0.36 (Mrk 279) to -0.48 (Mrk 817) to -1.10 (Mrk 290). Our preliminary OI FUSE analysis of the Mrk 817 sightline also supports the conclusion that metallicities as high as 0.3 times solar are encountered within Complex C. These results complicate an interpretation of Complex C as infalling low-metallicity Galactic fuel. Ionization corrections for HII and SIII cannot easily reconcile the higher apparent metallicities along the Mrk 817 and Mrk 279 sightlines with that seen toward Mrk 290, since H-alpha emission measures preclude the existence of sufficient HII. If gas along the other lines of sight has a similar pressure and temperature to that sampled toward Mrk 290, the predicted H-alpha emission measures would be 900 mR. It may be necessary to reclassify Complex C as mildly enriched Galactic waste from the Milky Way or processed gas torn from a disrupted neighboring dwarf, as opposed to low-metallicity Galactic fuel.
  • Detecting HI using redshifted Ly-alpha absorption lines is 1e6 times more sensitive than using the 21cm emission line. We review recent discoveries of HI Ly-alpha absorbers made with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) which have allowed us a first glimpse at gas in local intergalactic space between us and the ``Great Wall''. Despite its mere 2.4m aperture, HST can detect absorbers with column densities as low as those found using Keck at high-z (log N(HI)=12.5 1/cm**2). New results that will be discussed include: the evolution of absorbers with redshift, the location of absorbers relative to galaxies (including the two-point correlation function for absorbers), the metallicity of absorbers far from galaxies, and the discovery of hot 1e5-1e6 K (shock-heated?) absorbers. The unique ability of VLA HI observations in discovering the nearest galaxies to these absorbers is stressed.
  • In Paper I of this series (astro-ph/9911117) we described observations of 15 extragalactic targets taken with the Hubble Space Telescope GHRS/G160M grating for studies of the low-z Lya forest. We reported the detection of 110 Lya absorbers at significance level >3 sigma in the redshift range z=0.002-0.069, over a total pathlength of 116,000 km/s. In this second paper, we evaluate the physical properties of these Lya absorbers and compare them to their high-z counterparts. The distribution of Doppler parameters is similar to that at high redshift, with mean b = 35.0 +- 16.6 km/s. The true Doppler parameter may be somewhat lower, owing to component blends and non-thermal velocities. The distribution of equivalent widths exhibits a significant break at W~133mA, with an increasing number of weak absorbers (10mA-100mA). Adopting a curve of growth with b = 25 +- 5km/s and applying a sensitivity correction as a function of equivalent width and wavelength, we derive the distribution in column density, Nh^{-1.72+-0.06} for Nh<10^14 cm^-2. We find no redshift evolution in the sample at z<0.07, but we do see a significant decline in dN/dz compared to values at z>1.6. A 3 sigma signal in the two-point correlation function of Lya absorbers for velocity separations Delta v <150 km/s is consistent with results at high-z. Applying a photoionization correction, we find that the low-z Lya forest may contain ~20% of the total number of baryons, with closure parameter Omega_lya = (0.008+-0.001), for a standard absorber size and ionizing radiation field. Some of these clouds appear to be primordial matter, owing to the lack of detected metals in a composite spectrum. Our data suggest that a fraction of the absorbers are associated with gas in galaxy associations (filaments), while a second population is distributed more uniformly.
  • We report on the first metallicity determination for gas in the Magellanic Stream, using archival HST GHRS data for the background targets Fairall 9, III Zw 2, and NGC 7469. For Fairall 9, using two subsequent HST revisits and new Parkes Multibeam Narrowband observations, we have unequivocally detected the MSI HI component of the Stream (near its head) in SII1250,1253 yielding a metallicity of [SII/H]=-0.55+/-0.06(r)+/-0.2(s), consistent with either an SMC or LMC origin and with the earlier upper limit set by Lu et al. (1994). We also detect the saturated SiII1260 line, but set only a lower limit of [SiII/H]>-1.5. We present serendipitous detections of the Stream, seen in MgII2796,2803 absorption with column densities of (0.5-1)x10^13 cm^-2 toward the Seyfert galaxies III Zw 2 and NGC 7469. These latter sightlines probe gas near the tip of the Stream (80 deg down-Stream of Fairall 9). For III Zw 2, the lack of an accurate HI column density and the uncertain MgIII ionization correction limits the degree to which we can constrain [Mg/H]; a lower limit of [MgII/HI]>-1.3 was found. For NGC 7469, an accurate HI column density determination exists, but the extant FOS spectrum limits the quality of the MgII column density determination, and we conclude that [MgII/HI]>-1.5. Ionization corrections associated with MgIII and HII suggest that the corresponding [Mg/H] may range lower by 0.3-1.0 dex. However, an upward revision of 0.5-1.0 dex would be expected under the assumption that the Stream exhibits a dust depletion pattern similar to that seen in the Magellanic Clouds. Remaining uncertainties do not allow us to differentiate between an LMC versus SMC origin to the Stream gas.
  • We present the target selection, observations, and data reduction and analysis process for a program aimed at discovering numerous, weak (equivalent width < 100 mA) Lya absorption lines in the local Universe (0.003 < z < 0.069). The purpose of this program is to study the physical conditions of the local intergalactic medium, including absorber distributions in Doppler width and H I column density, absorber number density and evolution with redshift, line-of-sight two-point correlation function, and the baryonic content and metallicity. By making use of large-angle, nearby galaxy redshift surveys, we will investigate the relationship (if any) between these Lya absorbers and galaxies, superclusters and voids. In Paper I, we present high resolution (~19 km/s) spectroscopic observations of 15 very bright (V < 14.5) AGN targets made with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We find 81 definite (> 4 sigma) and 30 possible (3-4 sigma) Lya absorption lines in these spectra, which probe a total pathlength of 116,000 km/s (delta z ~ 0.4) at very low redshift (z < 0.069) and column density (12.5< Log[Nh] < 14.5). We found numerous metal lines arising in the Milky Way halo, including absorption from 14 distinct high velocity clouds and numerous absorptions intrinsic to the target AGN. Here, we describe the details of the target selection, HST observations, and spectral reduction and analysis. We present reduced spectra and absorption line lists and ``pie diagrams'' showing the known galaxy distributions in the direction of each target. In Papers II and III, we use the data presented here to determine the basic physical characteristics of the low-z Lya forest and to investigate the relationship of the absorbers to the local galaxy distribution.
  • We report observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the VLA on the galactic environment, metallicity, and D/H in strong low-redshift Lya absorption systems toward the bright BL Lac object PKS 2155-304. GHRS/G160M spectra at 20 km/s resolution show 14 Lya absorbers, 6 clustered at cz = 16,100-18,500 km/s. ORFEUS claimed LyC absorption at z = 0.056 with N(HI) = (2-5)x10^16 cm^-2, while our Lya data suggest N(HI) = (3-10)x10^14 cm^-2. Higher columns are possible if the Lya line core at 17,000 +/- 50 km/s contains narrow HI components. We identify the Lya cluster with a group of five HI galaxies offset by 400-800 kpc from the sightline. The two strongest absorption features cover the same velocity range as the HI emission in the two galaxies closest to the line of sight. If the Lya is associated with these galaxies, they must have huge halos of highly turbulent, mostly ionized gas. The Lya absorption could also arise from an extended sheet of intragroup gas, or from smaller primordial clouds and halos of dwarf galaxies. We see no absorption from SiIII 1206, CIV 1548, or DI Lya. Photoionization models yield limits of (Si/H) < 0.003 solar, (C/H) < 0.005 solar, (D/H) < 2.8x10^-4 (4 sigma) if N(HI) = 2x10^16 cm^-2. The limits increase to 0.023 solar and D/H < 2.8x10^-3 if N(HI) = 2x10^15 cm^-2. The data suggest that the IGM in this group has not been enriched to the levels suggested by X-ray studies of intracluster gas and that these absorbers could be primordial gas clouds.