• Recent studies establish that the cuprate pseudogap phase is susceptible at low temperatures to forming not only a $d$-symmetry superconducting (SC) state, but also a $d$-symmetry form factor (dFF) density wave (DW) state. The concurrent emergence of such distinct and unusual states from the pseudogap motivates theories that they are "intertwined" i.e derived from a quantum composite of dissimilar broken-symmetry orders. Some composite order theories predict that the balance between the different components can be altered, for example at superconducting vortex cores. Here, we introduce sublattice phase-resolved electronic structure imaging as a function of magnetic field and find robust dFF DW states induced at each vortex. They are predominantly unidirectional and co-oriented (nematic), exhibiting strong spatial-phase coherence. At each vortex we also detect the field-induced conversion of the SC to DW components and demonstrate that this occurs at precisely the eight momentum-space locations predicted in many composite order theories. These data provided direct microscopic evidence for the existence of composite order in the cuprates, and new indications of how the DW state becomes long-range ordered in high magnetic fields.
  • We describe the phases of a solvable $t$-$J$ model of electrons with infinite-range, and random, hopping and exchange interactions, similar to those in the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev models. The electron fractionalizes, as in an `orthogonal metal', into a fermion $f$ which carries both the electron spin and charge, and a boson $\phi$. Both $f$ and $\phi$ carry emergent $\mathbb{Z}_2$ gauge charges. The model has a phase in which the $\phi$ bosons are gapped, and the $f$ fermions are gapless and critical, and so the electron spectral function is gapped. This phase can be considered as a toy model for the underdoped cuprates. The model also has an extended, critical, `quasi-Higgs' phase where both $\phi$ and $f$ are gapless, and the electron operator $\sim f \phi$ has a Fermi liquid-like $1/\tau$ propagator in imaginary time, $\tau$. So while the electron spectral function has a Fermi liquid form, other properties are controlled by $\mathbb{Z}_2$ fractionalization and the anomalous exponents of the $f$ and $\phi$ excitations. This `quasi-Higgs' phase is proposed as a toy model of the overdoped cuprates. We also describe the critical state separating these two phases.
  • This review describes how topological order can reconstruct Fermi surfaces of metals, even in the absence of translational symmetry breaking. We begin with an introduction to topological order using Wegner's quantum $\mathbb{Z}_2$ gauge theory on the square lattice: the topological state is characterized by the expulsion of defects, carrying $\mathbb{Z}_2$ magnetic flux. The interplay between topological order and the breaking of global symmetry is described by the non-zero temperature statistical mechanics of classical XY models in dimension $D=3$; such models also describe the zero temperature quantum phases of bosons with short-range interactions on the square lattice at integer filling. The topological state is again characterized by the expulsion of certain defects, in a state with fluctuating symmetry-breaking order. The phase diagrams of the $\mathbb{Z}_2$ gauge theory and the XY models are obtained by embedding them in U(1) gauge theories, and by studying their Higgs and confining phases. These ideas are then applied to the single-band Hubbard model on the square lattice. A SU(2) gauge theory describes the fluctuations of spin-density-wave order, and its phase diagram is presented by analogy to the XY models. We obtain a class of zero temperature metallic states with fluctuating spin-density wave order, topological order associated with defect expulsion, reconstructed Fermi surfaces (with `chargon' or electron-like quasiparticles), but no broken symmetry. We conclude with the application of such metallic states to the pseudogap phase of the cuprates, and note the recent comparison with numerical studies of the Hubbard model. In a detour, we also discuss the influence of Berry phases, and how they can lead to deconfined quantum critical points: this applies to bosons on the square lattice at half-integer filling, and to quantum dimer models.
  • We compute the electronic Green's function of the topologically ordered Higgs phase of a SU(2) gauge theory of fluctuating antiferromagnetism on the square lattice. The results are compared with cluster extensions of dynamical mean field theory, and quantum Monte Carlo calculations, on the pseudogap phase of the strongly interacting hole-doped Hubbard model. Good agreement is found in the momentum, frequency, hopping, and doping dependencies of the spectral function and electronic self-energy. We show that lines of (approximate) zeros of the zero-frequency electronic Green's function are signs of the underlying topological order of the gauge theory, and describe how these lines of zeros appear in our theory of the Hubbard model. We also derive a modified, non-perturbative version of the Luttinger theorem that holds in the Higgs phase.
  • We study a model of fermions on the square lattice at half-filling coupled to an Ising gauge theory, that was recently shown in Monte Carlo simulations to exhibit $\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological order and massless Dirac fermion excitations. On tuning parameters, a confining phase with broken symmetry (an antiferromagnet in one choice of Hamiltonian) was also established, and the transition between these phases was found to be continuous, with co-incident onset of symmetry breaking and confinement. While the confinement transition in pure gauge theories is well understood in terms of condensing magnetic flux excitations, the same transition in the presence of gapless fermions is a challenging problem owing to the statistical interactions between fermions and the condensing flux excitations. The conventional scenario then proceeds via a two step transition, involving a symmetry breaking transition leading to gapped fermions followed by confinement. In contrast, here, using large scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we provide further evidence for a direct, continuous transition and also find numerical evidence for an enlarged $SO(5)$ symmetry rotating between antiferromagnetism and valence bond solid orders proximate to criticality. Guided by our numerical finding, we develop a field theory description of the direct transition involving an emergent non-abelian ($SU(2)$) gauge theory and a matrix Higgs field. We contrast our results with the conventional Gross--Neveu--Yukawa transition.
  • One of the distinctive features of hole-doped cuprate superconductors is the onset of a `pseudogap' below a temperature $T^*$. Recent experiments suggest that there may be a connection between the existence of the pseudogap and the topology of the Fermi surface. Here, we address this issue by studying the two-dimensional Hubbard model with two distinct numerical methods. We find that the pseudogap only exists when the Fermi surface is hole-like and that, for a broad range of parameters, its opening is concomitant with a Fermi surface topology change from electron- to hole-like. We identify a common link between these observations: the pole-like feature of the electronic self-energy associated with the formation of the pseudogap is found to also control the degree of particle-hole asymmetry, and hence the Fermi surface topology transition. We interpret our results in the framework of an SU(2) gauge theory of fluctuating antiferromagnetism. We show that a mean-field treatment of this theory in a metallic state with U(1) topological order provides an explanation of this pole-like feature, and a good description of our numerical results. We discuss the relevance of our results to experiments on cuprates.
  • We present a review of theories of states of quantum matter without quasiparticle excitations. Solvable examples of such states are provided through a holographic duality with gravitational theories in an emergent spatial dimension. We review the duality between gravitational backgrounds and the various states of quantum matter which live on the boundary. We then describe quantum matter at a fixed commensurate density (often described by conformal field theories), and also compressible quantum matter with variable density, providing an extensive discussion of transport in both cases. We present a unified discussion of the holographic theory of transport with memory matrix and hydrodynamic methods, allowing a direct connection to experimentally realized quantum matter. We also explore other important challenges in non-quasiparticle physics, including symmetry broken phases such as superconductors and non-equilibrium dynamics.
  • In most materials, transport can be described by the motion of distinct species of quasiparticles, such as electrons and phonons. Strong interactions between quasiparticles, however, can lead to collective behaviour, including the possibility of viscous hydrodynamic flow. In the case of electrons and phonons, an electron-phonon fluid is expected to exhibit strong phonon-drag transport signatures and an anomalously low thermal conductivity. The Dirac semi-metal PtSn4 has a very low resistivity at low temperatures and shows a pronounced phonon drag peak in the low temperature thermopower; it is therefore an excellent candidate for hosting a hydrodynamic electron-phonon fluid. Here we report measurements of the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the longitudinal and Hall electrical resistivities, the thermopower and the thermal conductivity of PtSn4. We confirm a phonon drag peak in the thermopower near 14 K and observe a concurrent breakdown of the Lorenz ratio below the Sommerfeld value. Both of these facts are expected for an electron-phonon fluid with a quasi-conserved total momentum. A hierarchy between momentum-conserving and momentum-relaxing scattering timescales is corroborated through measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the electrical and Hall resistivity and of the thermal conductivity. These results show that PtSn4 exhibits key features of hydrodynamic transport.
  • When very high magnetic fields suppress the superconductivity in underdoped cuprates, an exceptional new electronic phase appears. It supports remarkable and unexplained quantum oscillations and exhibits an unidentified density wave (DW) state. Although generally referred to as a "charge" density wave (CDW) because of the observed charge density modulations, theory indicates that this could actually be the far more elusive electron-pair density wave state (PDW). To search for evidence of a field-induced PDW in cuprates, we visualize the modulations in the density of electronic states $N(\bf{r})$ within the halo surrounding Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_8$ vortex cores. This reveals multiple signatures of a field-induced PDW, including two sets of $N(\bf{r})$ modulations occurring at wavevectors $\bf{Q}_P$ and $2\bf{Q}_P$, both having predominantly $s$-symmetry form factors, the amplitude of the latter decaying twice as rapidly as the former, along with induced energy-gap modulations at $\bf{Q}_P$ . Such a microscopic phenomenology is in detailed agreement with theory for a field-induced primary PDW that generates secondary CDWs within the vortex halo. These data indicate that the fundamental state generated by increasing magnetic fields from the underdoped cuprate superconducting phase is actually a PDW with approximately eight CuO$_2$ unit-cell periodicity ($\lambda = 8a_0$) and predominantly $d$-symmetry form factor.
  • Quantum fluctuations of the N\'eel state of the square lattice antiferromagnet are usually described by a $\mathbb{CP}^1$ theory of bosonic spinons coupled to a U(1) gauge field, and with a global SU(2) spin rotation symmetry. Such a theory also has a confining phase with valence bond solid (VBS) order, and upon including spin-singlet charge 2 Higgs fields, deconfined phases with $\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological order possibly intertwined with discrete broken global symmetries. We present dual theories of the same phases starting from a mean-field theory of fermionic spinons moving in $\pi$-flux in each square lattice plaquette. Fluctuations about this $\pi$-flux state are described by 2+1 dimensional quantum chromodynamics (QCD$_3$) with a SU(2) gauge group and $N_f=2$ flavors of massless Dirac fermions. It has recently been argued by Wang et al. (arXiv:1703.02426) that this QCD$_3$ theory describes the N\'eel-VBS quantum phase transition. We introduce adjoint Higgs fields in QCD$_3$, and obtain fermionic dual descriptions of the phases with $\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological order obtained earlier using the bosonic $\mathbb{CP}^1$ theory. We also present a fermionic spinon derivation of the monopole Berry phases in the U(1) gauge theory of the VBS state. The global phase diagram of these phases contains multi-critical points, and our results imply new boson-fermion dualities between critical gauge theories of these points.
  • We engineer a microscopic model of two-dimensional conduction electrons locally and randomly scattering off impurity sites which are described by Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) models. For a particular choice of the scattering interaction, this model realizes a controlled description of a diffusive marginal-Fermi liquid (MFL) without momentum conservation, which has a linear-in-$T$ resistivity and a $T\ln T$ specific heat as $T \rightarrow 0$. By tuning the strength of the scattering interaction relative to the bandwidth of the conduction electrons, we can additionally obtain a finite-$T$ crossover to a fully incoherent regime that also has a linear-in-$T$ resistivity. We describe the magnetotransport properties of this model. We then consider a macroscopically disordered sample with domains of such MFLs with varying electron and impurity densities. Using an effective-medium approximation, we obtain a macroscopic electrical resistance that scales linearly in the magnetic field $B$ applied perpendicular to the plane of the sample, at large $B$. The resistance also scales linearly in $T$ at small $B$, and as $T f(B/T)$ at intermediate $B$. We consider implications for recent experiments reporting linear transverse magnetoresistance in the strange metal phases of the pnictides and cuprates.
  • The pseudogap metal phase of the hole-doped cuprate superconductors has two seemingly unrelated characteristics: a gap in the electronic spectrum in the `anti-nodal' region of the square lattice Brillouin zone, and discrete broken symmetries. We present a SU(2) gauge theory of quantum fluctuations of magnetically ordered states which appear in a classical theory of square lattice antiferromagnets, in a spin density wave mean field theory of the square lattice Hubbard model, and in a CP$^1$ theory of spinons. This theory leads to metals with an antinodal gap, and topological order which intertwines with precisely the observed broken symmetries.
  • We present a universal theory for the critical behavior of an impurity at the two-dimensional superfluid-Mott insulator transition. Our analysis is motivated by a numerical study of the Bose-Hubbard model with an impurity site by Huang et al. (Phys. Rev. B 94, 220502 (2016)), who found an impurity phase transition as a function of the trapping potential. The bulk theory is described by the $O(2)$ symmetric Wilson-Fisher conformal field theory, and we model the impurity by a localized spin-1/2 degree of freedom. We also consider a generalized model by considering an $O(N)$ symmetric bulk theory coupled to a spin-$S$ degree of freedom. We study this field theory using the $\epsilon = 3 - d$ expansion, where the impurity-bulk interaction flows to an infrared stable fixed point at the critical trapping potential. We determine the scaling dimensions of the impurity degree of freedom and the associated critical exponents near the critical point. We also determine the universal contribution of the impurity to the finite temperature compressibility of the system at criticality. Our results are compared with recent numerical simulations.
  • We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron field operators inherits a light-cone like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov) exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information, that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent $z > 1$.
  • We study thermal and electrical transport in metals and superconductors near a quantum phase transition where antiferromagnetic order disappears. The same theory can also be applied to quantum phase transitions involving the loss of certain classes of intrinsic topological order. For a clean superconductor, we recover and extend the well-known universal results. The heat conductivity for commensurate and incommensurate antiferromagnetism coexisting with superconductivity shows a markedly different doping dependence near the quantum critical point, thus allowing to distinguish the states. In the dirty limit, the results for the conductivities are qualitatively similar for the metal and the superconductor. In this regime, the geometric properties of the Fermi surface allow for a very good phenomenological understanding of the numerical results on the conductivities. In the simplest model, we find that the conductivities do not track the doping evolution of the Hall coefficient, in contrast to recent experimental findings. We propose a doping dependent scattering rate, possibly due to quenched short-range charge fluctuations below optimal doping, to consistently describe both the Hall data and the longitudinal conductivities.
  • We study the finite-size spectrum of the O($N$) symmetric Wilson-Fisher conformal field theory (CFT) on the $d=2$ spatial-dimension torus using the expansion in $\epsilon=3-d$. This is done by deriving a set of universal effective Hamiltonians describing fluctuations of the zero momentum modes. The effective Hamiltonians take the form of $N$-dimensional quantum anharmonic oscillators, which are shown to be strongly coupled at the critical point for small $\epsilon$. The low-energy spectrum is solved numerically for $N = 1,2,3,4$. Using exact diagonalization (ED), we also numerically study explicit lattice models known to be in the O($2$) and O($3$) universality class, obtaining estimates of the low-lying critical spectrum. The analytic and numerical results show excellent agreement and the critical low energy torus spectra are qualitatively different among the studied CFTs, identifying them as a useful fingerprint for detecting the universality class of a quantum critical point.
  • We describe the non-equilibrium dynamics of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev models of fermions with all-to-all interactions. These provide tractable models of the dynamics of quantum systems without quasiparticle excitations. The Kadanoff-Baym equations show that the final state is thermal, and their numerical analysis appears consistent with a thermalization rate proportional to the absolute temperature of the final state. We also obtain an exact analytic solution of the non-equilibrium dynamics in the large $q$ limit of a model with $q$ fermion interactions: in this limit, the thermalization of the fermion Green's function is instantaneous.
  • We study the thermal diffusivity $D_T$ in models of metals without quasiparticle excitations (`strange metals'). The many-body quantum chaos and transport properties of such metals can be efficiently described by a holographic representation in a gravitational theory in an emergent curved spacetime with an additional spatial dimension. We find that at generic infra-red fixed points $D_T$ is always related to parameters characterizing many-body quantum chaos: the butterfly velocity $v_B$, and Lyapunov time $\tau_L$ through $D_T \sim v_B^2 \tau_L$. The relationship holds independently of the charge density, periodic potential strength or magnetic field at the fixed point. The generality of this result follows from the observation that the thermal conductivity of strange metals depends only on the metric near the horizon of a black hole in the emergent spacetime, and is otherwise insensitive to the profile of any matter fields.
  • Numerous experiments have reported discrete symmetry breaking in the high temperature pseudogap phase of the hole-doped cuprates, including breaking of one or more of lattice rotation, inversion, or time-reversal symmetries. In the absence of translational symmetry breaking or topological order, these conventional order parameters cannot explain the gap in the charged fermion excitation spectrum in the anti-nodal region. Zhao et al. (1601.01688) and Jeong et al. (arXiv:1701.06485) have also reported inversion and time-reversal symmetry breaking in insulating Sr2IrO4 similar to that in the metallic cuprates, but co-existing with Neel order. We extend an earlier theory of topological order in insulators and metals, in which the topological order combines naturally with the breaking of these conventional discrete symmetries. We find translationally-invariant states with topological order co-existing with both Ising-nematic order and spontaneous charge currents. The link between the discrete broken symmetries and the topological-order-induced pseudogap explains why the broken symmetries do not survive in the confining phases without a pseudogap at large doping. Our theory also connects to the O(3) non-linear sigma model and CP1 descriptions of quantum fluctuations of the Neel order. In this framework, the optimal doping criticality of the cuprates is primarily associated with the loss of topological order.
  • Quantum electrodynamics in 2+1-dimensions (QED$_3$) is a strongly coupled conformal field theory (CFT) of a U(1) gauge field coupled to $2N$ two-component massless fermions. The $N=2$ CFT has been proposed as a ground state of the spin-1/2 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet. We study QED$_3$ in the presence of weak quenched disorder in its two spatial directions. When the disorder explicitly breaks the fermion flavor symmetry from SU($2N$)$\rightarrow$U(1)$\times$SU($N$) but preserves time-reversal symmetry, we find that the theory flows to a non-trivial fixed line at non-zero disorder with a continuously varying dynamical critical exponent $z>1$. We determine the zero-temperature flavor (spin) conductivity along the critical line. Our calculations are performed in the large-$N$ limit, and the disorder is handled using the replica method.
  • We compute the thermodynamic properties of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) models of fermions with a conserved fermion number, $\mathcal{Q}$. We extend a previously proposed Schwarzian effective action to include a phase field, and this describes the low temperature energy and $\mathcal{Q}$ fluctuations. We obtain higher-dimensional generalizations of the SYK models which display disordered metallic states without quasiparticle excitations, and we deduce their thermoelectric transport coefficients. We also examine the corresponding properties of Einstein-Maxwell-scalar theories on black brane geometries which interpolate from either AdS$_4$ or AdS$_5$ to an AdS$_2\times \mathbb{R}^2$ or AdS$_2\times \mathbb{R}^3$ near-horizon geometry. These provide holographic descriptions of non-quasiparticle metallic states without momentum conservation. We find a precise match between low temperature transport and thermodynamics of the SYK and holographic models. In both models the Seebeck transport coefficient is exactly equal to the $\mathcal{Q}$-derivative of the entropy. For the SYK models, quantum chaos, as characterized by the butterfly velocity and the Lyapunov rate, universally determines the thermal diffusivity, but not the charge diffusivity.
  • We compute parameters characterizing many-body quantum chaos for a critical Fermi surface without quasiparticle excitations. We examine a theory of $N$ species of fermions at non-zero density coupled to a $U(1)$ gauge field in two spatial dimensions, and determine the Lyapunov rate and the butterfly velocity in an extended random-phase approximation. The thermal diffusivity is found to be universally related to these chaos parameters i.e. the relationship is independent of $N$, the gauge coupling constant, the Fermi velocity, the Fermi surface curvature, and high energy details.
  • We discuss a supersymmetric generalization of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model. These are quantum mechanical models involving $N$ Majorana fermions. The supercharge is given by a polynomial expression in terms of the Majorana fermions with random coefficients. The Hamiltonian is the square of the supercharge. The ${\cal N}=1$ model with a single supercharge has unbroken supersymmetry at large $N$, but non-perturbatively spontaneously broken supersymmetry in the exact theory. We analyze the model by looking at the large $N$ equation, and also by performing numerical computations for small values of $N$. We also compute the large $N$ spectrum of "singlet" operators, where we find a structure qualitatively similar to the ordinary SYK model. We also discuss an ${\cal N}=2$ version. In this case, the model preserves supersymmetry in the exact theory and we can compute a suitably weighted Witten index to count the number of ground states, which agrees with the large $N$ computation of the entropy. In both cases, we discuss the supersymmetric generalizations of the Schwarzian action which give the dominant effects at low energies.
  • In an isotropic strongly interacting quantum liquid without quasiparticles, general scaling arguments imply that the dimensionless ratio $(k_B /\hbar)\, \eta/s$, where $\eta$ is the shear viscosity and $s$ is the entropy density, is a universal number. We compute the shear viscosity of the Ising-nematic critical point of metals in spatial dimension $d=2$ by an expansion below $d=5/2$. The anisotropy associated with directions parallel and normal to the Fermi surface leads to a violation of the scaling expectations: $\eta$ scales in the same manner as a chiral conductivity, and the ratio $\eta/s$ diverges at low temperature ($T$) as $T^{-2/z}$, where $z$ is the dynamic critical exponent for fermionic excitations dispersing normal to the Fermi surface.
  • We compute the entanglement entropy of the Wilson-Fisher conformal field theory (CFT) in 2+1 dimensions with O($N$) symmetry in the limit of large $N$ for general entanglement geometries. We show that the leading large $N$ result can be obtained from the entanglement entropy of $N$ Gaussian scalar fields with their mass determined by the geometry. For a few geometries, the universal part of the entanglement entropy of the Wilson-Fisher CFT equals that of a CFT of $N$ massless scalar fields. However, in most cases, these CFTs have a distinct universal entanglement entropy even at $N=\infty$. Notably, for a semi-infinite cylindrical region it scales as $N^0$, in stark contrast to the $N$-linear result of the Gaussian fixed point.