• We analyzed data from the first year of a survey for Near Earth Objects (NEOs) that we are carrying out with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. We implanted synthetic NEOs into the data stream to derive our nightly detection efficiency as a function of magnitude and rate of motion. Using these measured efficiencies and the Solar System absolute magnitudes derived by the Minor Planet Center for the 1377 measurements of 235 unique NEOs detected, we directly derive, for the first time from a single observational data set, the NEO size distribution from 1 km down to 10 meters. We find that there are 10^6.6 NEOs larger than 10 meters. This result implies a factor of ten fewer small NEOs than some previous results, though our derived size distribution is in good agreement with several other estimates.
  • Using the Wide Field Camera for the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, we measure the near-infrared colors of near-Earth objects (NEOs) in order to put constraints on their taxonomic classifications. The rapid-response character of our observations allows us to observe NEOs when they are close to the Earth and bright. Here we present near-infrared color measurements of 86 NEOs, most of which were observed within a few days of their discovery, allowing us to characterize NEOs with diameters of only a few meters. Using machine-learning methods, we compare our measurements to existing asteroid spectral data and provide probabilistic taxonomic classifications for our targets. Our observations allow us to distinguish between S-complex, C/X-complex, D-type, and V-type asteroids. Our results suggest that the fraction of S-complex asteroids in the whole NEO population is lower than the fraction of ordinary chondrites in the meteorite fall statistics. Future data obtained with UKIRT will be used to investigate the significance of this discrepancy.
  • The science goals for ground-based large-area surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a per cent or better. This performance will need to be achieved with data taken over the course of many years, and often in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a strategy to achieve precise internal calibration of imaging survey data taken in less than photometric conditions, and reports results of an observational study of the techniques needed to implement this strategy. We find that images of celestial fields used in this case study with stellar densities of order one per arcmin-squared and taken through cloudless skies can be calibrated with relative precision of 0.5 per cent (reproducibility). We report measurements of spatial structure functions of cloud absorption observed over a range of atmospheric conditions, and find it possible to achieve photometric measurements that are reproducible to 1 per cent in images that were taken through cloud layers that transmit as little as 25 per cent of the incident optical flux (1.5 magnitudes of extinction). We find, however, that photometric precision below 1 per cent is impeded by the thinnest detectable cloud layers. We comment on implications of these results for the observing strategies of future surveys.
  • The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) aims to detect serendipitous occultations of stars by small (about 1 km diameter) objects in the Kuiper Belt and beyond. Such events are very rare (<0.001 events per star per year) and short in duration (about 200 ms), so many stars must be monitored at a high readout cadence. TAOS monitors typically around 500 stars simultaneously at a 5 Hz readout cadence with four telescopes located at Lulin Observatory in central Taiwan. In this paper, we report the results of the search for small Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) in seven years of data. No occultation events were found, resulting in a 95% c.l. upper limit on the slope of the faint end of the KBO size distribution of q = 3.34 to 3.82, depending on the surface density at the break in the size distribution at a diameter of about 90 km.
  • The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) project has collected more than a billion photometric measurements since 2005 January. These sky survey data-covering timescales from a fraction of a second to a few hundred days-are a useful source to study stellar variability. A total of 167 star fields, mostly along the ecliptic plane, have been selected for photometric monitoring with the TAOS telescopes. This paper presents our initial analysis of a search for periodic variable stars from the time-series TAOS data on one particular TAOS field, No. 151 (RA = 17$^{\rm h}30^{\rm m}6\fs$67, Dec = 27\degr17\arcmin 30\arcsec, J2000), which had been observed over 47 epochs in 2005. A total of 81 candidate variables are identified in the 3 square degree field, with magnitudes in the range 8 < R < 16. On the basis of the periodicity and shape of the lightcurves, 29 variables, 15 of which were previously unknown, are classified as RR Lyrae, Cepheid, delta Scuti, SX Phonencis, semi-regular and eclipsing binaries.
  • The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) monitors fields of up to ~1000 stars at 5 Hz simultaneously with four small telescopes to detect occultation events from small (~1 km) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). The survey presents a number of challenges, in particular the fact that the occultation events we are searching for are extremely rare and are typically manifested as slight flux drops for only one or two consecutive time series measurements. We have developed a statistical analysis technique to search the multi-telescope data set for simultaneous flux drops which provides a robust false positive rejection and calculation of event significance. In this paper, we describe in detail this statistical technique and its application to the TAOS data set.
  • We have analyzed the first 3.75 years of data from TAOS, the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey. TAOS monitors bright stars to search for occultations by Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). This dataset comprises 5e5 star-hours of multi-telescope photometric data taken at 4 or 5 Hz. No events consistent with KBO occultations were found in this dataset. We compute the number of events expected for the Kuiper Belt formation and evolution models of Pan & Sari (2005), Kenyon & Bromley (2004), Benavidez & Campo Bagatin (2009), and Fraser (2009). A comparison with the upper limits we derive from our data constrains the parameter space of these models. This is the first detailed comparison of models of the KBO size distribution with data from an occultation survey. Our results suggest that the KBO population is comprised of objects with low internal strength and that planetary migration played a role in the shaping of the size distribution.
  • We analyzed data accumulated during 2005 and 2006 by the Taiwan-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) in order to detect short-period variable stars (periods of <~ 1 hour) such as delta Scuti. TAOS is designed for the detection of stellar occultation by small-size Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and is operating four 50cm telescopes at an effective cadence of 5Hz. The four telescopes simultaneously monitor the same patch of the sky in order to reduce false positives. To detect short-period variables, we used the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm (FFT) inasmuch as the data points in TAOS light-curves are evenly spaced. Using FFT, we found 41 short-period variables with amplitudes smaller than a few hundredths of a magnitude and periods of about an hour, which suggest that they are low-amplitude delta Scuti stars (LADS). The light-curves of TAOS delta Scuti stars are accessible online at the Time Series Center website (http://timemachine.iic.harvard.edu)
  • We present the results of a search for occultation events by objects at distances between 100 and 1000 AU in lightcurves from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS). We searched for consecutive, shallow flux reductions in the stellar lightcurves obtained by our survey between 7 February 2005 and 31 December 2006 with a total of $\sim4.5\times10^{9}$ three-telescope simultaneous photometric measurements. No events were detected, allowing us to set upper limits on the number density as a function of size and distance of objects in Sedna-like orbits, using simple models.
  • The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) operates four fully automatic telescopes to search for occultations of stars by Kuiper Belt Objects. It is a versatile facility that is also useful for the study of initial optical GRB afterglows. This paper provides a detailed description of the TAOS multi-telescope system, control software, and high-speed imaging.
  • The star BD+29 1748 was resolved to be a close binary from its occultation by the asteroid 87 Sylvia on 2006 December 18 UT. Four telescopes were used to observe this event at two sites separated by some 80 km apart. Two flux drops were observed at one site, whereas only one flux drop was detected at the other. From the long-term variation of Sylvia, we inferred the probable shape of the shadow during the occultation, and this in turn constrains the binary parameters: the two components of BD+29 1748 have a projected separation of 0.097" to 0.110" on the sky with a position angle 104 deg to 107 deg. The asteroid was clearly resolved with a size scale ranging from 130 to 290 km, as projected onto the occultation direction. No occultation was detected for either of the two known moonlets of 87 Sylvia.
  • The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain, starting in 2015, multiple images of the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg$^2$ region about 1000 times during the anticipated 10 years of operations (distributed over six bands, $ugrizy$). Each 30-second long visit will deliver 5$\sigma$ depth for point sources of $r\sim24.5$ on average. The co-added map will be about 3 magnitudes deeper, and will include 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars. We discuss various measurements that will be automatically performed for these 20 billion sources, and how they can be used for classification and determination of source physical and other properties. We provide a few classification examples based on SDSS data, such as color classification of stars, color-spatial proximity search for wide-angle binary stars, orbital-color classification of asteroid families, and the recognition of main Galaxy components based on the distribution of stars in the position-metallicity-kinematics space. Guided by these examples, we anticipate that two grand classification challenges for LSST will be 1) rapid and robust classification of sources detected in difference images, and 2) {\it simultaneous} treatment of diverse astrometric and photometric time series measurements for an unprecedentedly large number of objects.
  • Results from the first two years of data from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) are presented. Stars have been monitored photometrically at 4 Hz or 5 Hz to search for occultations by small (~3 km) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). No statistically significant events were found, allowing us to present an upper bound to the size distribution of KBOs with diameters 0.5 km < D < 28 km.
  • This paper has been withdrawn
  • The Taiwan-America Occultation Survey (TAOS) aims to determine the number of small icy bodies in the outer reach of the Solar System by means of stellar occultation. An array of 4 robotic small (D=0.5 m), wide-field (f/1.9) telescopes have been installed at Lulin Observatory in Taiwan to simultaneously monitor some thousand of stars for such rare occultation events. Because a typical occultation event by a TNO a few km across will last for only a fraction of a second, fast photometry is necessary. A special CCD readout scheme has been devised to allow for stellar photometry taken a few times per second. Effective analysis pipelines have been developed to process stellar light curves and to correlate any possible flux changes among all telescopes. A few billion photometric measurements have been collected since the routine survey began in early 2005. Our preliminary result of a very low detection rate suggests a deficit of small TNOs down to a few km size, consistent with the extrapolation of some recent studies of larger (30--100 km) TNOs.
  • Planetary nebulae are now well established as probes of galaxy dynamics and as standard candles in distance determinations. Motivated by the need to improve the efficiency of planetary nebulae searches and the speed with which their radial velocities are determined, a dedicated instrument - the Planetary Nebulae Spectrograph or PN.S - has been designed and commissioned at the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. The high optical efficiency of the spectrograph results in the detection of typically ~ 150 PN in galaxies at the distance of the Virgo cluster in one night of observations. In the same observation the radial velocities are obtained with an accuracy of ~ 20 km/s
  • GRB 000926 has one of the best-studied afterglows to-date, with multiple X-ray observations, as well as extensive multi-frequency optical and radio coverage. Broadband afterglow observations, spanning from X-ray to radio frequencies, provide a probe of the density structure of the circumburst medium, as well as of the ejecta energetics, geometry, and the physical parameters of the relativistic blastwave resulting from the explosion. We present an analysis of {\em Chandra X-ray Observatory} observations of this event, along with {\em Hubble Space Telescope} and radio monitoring. We combine these data with ground-based optical and IR observations and fit the synthesized afterglow lightcurve using models where collimated ejecta expand into a surrounding medium. We find that we can explain the broadband lightcurve with reasonable physical parameters only if the cooling is dominated by inverse Compton scattering. Excess X-ray emission in the broadband spectrum indicates that we are directly observing a contribution from inverse Compton scattering. It is the first time this has been observed in a GRB afterglow, and it implies that the GRB exploded in a reasonably dense (n~30 cm^{-3}) medium, consistent with a diffuse interstellar cloud environment.
  • More than 1300 variables classified provisionally as first overtone RR Lyrae pulsators in the MACHO variable star database of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been subjected to standard frequency analysis. Based on the remnant power in the prewhitened spectra, we found 70% of the total population to be monoperiodic. The remaining 30% (411 stars) are classified as one of 9 types according to their frequency spectra. Several types of RR Lyrae pulsational behavior are clearly identified here for the first time. Together with the earlier discovered double-mode (fundamental & first overtone) variables this study increased the number of the known double-mode stars in the LMC to 181. During the total 6.5yr time span of the data, 10% of the stars show strong period changes. We also discovered two additional types of multifrequency pulsators with low occurrence rates of 2% for each. In the first type there remains one closely spaced component after prewhitening by the main pulsation frequency. In the second type the number of remnant components is two, they are also closely spaced, and, in addition, they are symmetric in their frequency spacing relative to the central component. This latter type of variables is associated with their relatives among the fundamental pulsators, known as Blazhko variables. Their high frequency (~20%) among the fundamental mode variables versus the low occurrence rate of their first overtone counterparts makes it more difficult to explain Blazhko phenomenon by any theory depending mainly on the role of aspect angle or magnetic field. Current theoretical models invoke nonradial pulsation components in these stars.
  • We present multi-color optical and two-frequency radio observations of the bright SAX event, GRB 990510. The well-sampled optical decay, together with the radio observations are inconsistent with simple spherical afterglow models. The achromatic optical steepening and the decay of the radio afterglow both occuring at $t \sim 1$ day are evidence for hydrodynamical evolution of the source, and can be most easily interpreted by models where the GRB ejecta are collimated in a jet. Employing a simple jet model to interpret the observations, we derive a jet opening angle of $\theta_o = 0.08$, reducing the isotropic gamma-ray emission of $2.9 \times 10^{53}$ erg by a factor $\sim 300$. If the jet interpretation is correct, we conclude that GRB observations to-date are consistent with an energy for the central source of $E \lsim 10^{52}$ erg.
  • We provide a status report on our search for dark matter in our Galaxy in the form of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs), using gravitational microlensing of background stars. This search uses a very large CCD camera on the dedicated 1.27m telescope at Mt.~Stromlo, Australia, and has been taking data for 2 years. At present, we have analysed data for 8 million stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud over 1 year, resulting in one strong candidate event and two lower-amplitude candidates. We have also analysed 5 million stars in the Galactic Bulge for 0.5 years, yielding approximately 27 microlensing events.