• We have carried out simulations to predict the performance of a new space-based telescopic survey operating at thermal infrared wavelengths that seeks to discover and characterize a large fraction of the potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population. Two potential architectures for the survey were considered: one located at the Earth-Sun L1 Lagrange point, and one in a Venus-trailing orbit. A sample cadence was formulated and tested, allowing for the self-follow-up necessary for objects discovered in the daytime sky on Earth. Synthetic populations of NEAs with sizes >=140 m in effective spherical diameter were simulated using recent determinations of their physical and orbital properties. Estimates of the instrumental sensitivity, integration times, and slew speeds were included for both architectures assuming the properties of new large-format 10 um detector arrays capable of operating at ~35 K. Our simulation included the creation of a preliminary version of a moving object processing pipeline suitable for operating on the trial cadence. We tested this pipeline on a simulated sky populated with astrophysical sources such as stars and galaxies extrapolated from Spitzer and WISE data, the catalog of known minor planets (including Main Belt asteroids, comets, Jovian Trojans, etc.), and the synthetic NEA model. Trial orbits were computed for simulated position-time pairs extracted from the synthetic surveys to verify that the tested cadence would result in orbits suitable for recovering objects at a later time. Our results indicate that the Earth-Sun L1 and Venus-trailing surveys achieve similar levels of integral completeness for potentially hazardous asteroids larger than 140 m; placing the telescope in an interior orbit does not yield an improvement in discovery rates. This work serves as a necessary first step for the detailed planning of a next-generation NEA survey.
  • NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft has been brought out of hibernation and has resumed surveying the sky at 3.4 and 4.6 um. The scientific objectives of the NEOWISE reactivation mission are to detect, track, and characterize near-Earth asteroids and comets. The search for minor planets resumed on December 23, 2013, and the first new near-Earth object (NEO) was discovered six days later. As an infrared survey, NEOWISE detects asteroids based on their thermal emission and is equally sensitive to high and low albedo objects; consequently, NEOWISE-discovered NEOs tend to be large and dark. Over the course of its three-year mission, NEOWISE will determine radiometrically-derived diameters and albedos for approximately 2000 NEOs and tens of thousands of Main Belt asteroids. The 32 months of hibernation have had no significant effect on the mission's performance. Image quality, sensitivity, photometric and astrometric accuracy, completeness, and the rate of minor planet detections are all essentially unchanged from the prime mission's post-cryogenic phase.
  • The \emph{Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} has surveyed the entire sky at four infrared wavelengths with greatly improved sensitivity and spatial resolution compared to its predecessors, the \emph{Infrared Astronomical Satellite} and the \emph{Cosmic Background Explorer}. NASA's Planetary Science Division has funded an enhancement to the \WISE\ data processing system called "NEOWISE" that allows detection and archiving of moving objects found in the \WISE\ data. NEOWISE has mined the \WISE\ images for a wide array of small bodies in our Solar System, including Near-Earth Objects (NEOs), Main Belt asteroids, comets, Trojans, and Centaurs. By the end of survey operations in February 2011, NEOWISE identified over 157,000 asteroids, including more than 500 NEOs and $\sim$120 comets. The NEOWISE dataset will enable a panoply of new scientific investigations.
  • We have studied ~2100 early-type galaxies in the SDSS DR3 which have been detected by the GALEX Medium Imaging Survey (MIS), in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.11. Combining GALEX UV photometry with corollary optical data from the SDSS, we find that, at a 95 percent confidence level, at least ~30 percent of galaxies in this sample have UV to optical colours consistent with some recent star formation within the last Gyr. In particular, galaxies with a NUV - r colour less than 5.5 are very likely to have experienced such recent star formation, taking into account the possibility of a contribution to NUV flux from the UV upturn phenomenon. We find quantitative agreement between the observations and the predictions of a semi-analytical LCDM hierarchical merger model and deduce that early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.11 have ~1 to 3 percent of their stellar mass in stars less than 1 Gyr old. The average age of this recently formed population is ~300 to 500 Myrs. We also find that monolithically evolving galaxies, where recent star formation can be driven solely by recycled gas from stellar mass loss, cannot exhibit the blue colours (NUV - r < 5.5) seen in a significant fraction (~30 percent) of our observed sample.
  • We study the ultraviolet to far-infrared (hereafter UV-to-IR) SEDs of a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 0.7) UV-selected galaxies from the ELAIS-N1 and ELAIS-N2 fields by fitting a multi-wavelength dataset to a library of GRASIL templates. Star formation related properties of the galaxies are derived from the library of models by using the Bayesian statistics. We find a decreasing presence of galaxies with low attenuation and low total luminosity as redshift decreases, which does not hold for high total luminosity galaxies. In addition the dust attenuation of low mass galaxies increases as redshift decreases, and this trend seems to disappear for galaxies with M* > 10^11 M_sun. This result is consistent with a mass dependent evolution of the dust to gas ratio, which could be driven by a mass dependent efficiency of star formation in star forming galaxies. The specific star formation rates (SSFR) decrease with increasing stellar mass at all redshifts, and for a given stellar mass the SSFR decreases with decreasing redshift. The differences in the slope of the M*--SSFR relation found between this work and others at similar redshift could be explained by the adopted selection criteria of the samples which, for a UV selected sample, favours blue, star forming galaxies.
  • We present images, integrated photometry, surface-brightness and color profiles for a total of 1034 nearby galaxies recently observed by the GALEX satellite in its far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1516A) and near-ultraviolet (NUV; 2267A) bands. (...) This data set has been complemented with archival optical, near-infrared, and far-infrared fluxes and colors. We find that the integrated (FUV-K) color provides robust discrimination between elliptical and spiral/irregular galaxies and also among spiral galaxies of different sub-types. Elliptical galaxies with brighter K-band luminosities (i.e. more massive) are redder in (NUV-K) color but bluer in (FUV-NUV) than less massive ellipticals. In the case of the spiral/irregular galaxies our analysis shows the presence of a relatively tight correlation between the (FUV-NUV) color and the total infrared-to-UV ratio. The correlation found between (FUV-NUV) color and K-band luminosity (with lower luminosity objects being bluer than more luminous ones) can be explained as due to an increase in the dust content with galaxy luminosity. The images in this Atlas along with the profiles and integrated properties are publicly available through a dedicated web page at http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/GALEX_Atlas/
  • We combine data from SDSS and the GALEX and Spitzer observatories to create a sample of galaxies observed homogeneously from the UV to the Far-IR. This sample, consisting of ~460 galaxies observed spectroscopically by SDSS provides a multiwavelength (0.15-24 micron) view of obscured and unobscured star formation in nearby (z<0.3) galaxies with SFRs ranging from 0.01 to 100 M_solar/yr. We calculate a robust dust measure from the infrared to UV ratio (IRX) and explore the influence of star formation history (SFH) on the dust-UV color relation (i.e. the IRX-beta relation). We find that the UV colors of galaxies are only weakly dependent on their SFH as measured by the 4000A break. However, we find that the contributions of dust and SFH are distinguishable when colors at widely separated wavelengths (e.g. 0.23-3.6 micron) are introduced. We show this explicitly by recasting the IRX-beta relation as a more general IRX-SFH-color relation, which we examine in different projections. We also determine simple fits to this relation.
  • We use \textit{GALEX} (Galaxy Evolution Explorer) near-UV (NUV) photometry of a sample of early-type galaxies selected in \textit{SDSS} (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) to study the UV color-magnitude relation (CMR). $NUV-r$ color is an excellent tracer of even small amounts ($\sim 1$% mass fraction) of recent ($\la 1$ Gyr) star formation and so the $NUV-r$ CMR allows us to study the effect of environment on the recent star formation history. We analyze a volume-limited sample of 839 visually-inspected early-type galaxies in the redshift range $0.05 < z < 0.10$ brighter than $M_{r}$ of -21.5 with any possible emission-line or radio-selected AGN removed to avoid contamination. We find that contamination by AGN candidates and late-type interlopers highly bias any study of recent star formation in early-type galaxies and that, after removing those, our lower limit to the fraction of massive early-type galaxies showing signs of recent star formation is roughly $30 \pm 3%$ This suggests that residual star formation is common even amongst the present day early-type galaxy population. We find that the fraction of UV-bright early-type galaxies is 25% higher in low-density environments. However, the density effect is clear only in the lowest density bin. The blue galaxy fraction for the subsample of the brightest early-type galaxies however shows a very strong density dependence, in the sense that the blue galaxy fraction is lower in a higher density region.
  • We report the first year on-orbit performance results for the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), a NASA Small Explorer that is performing a survey of the sky in two ultraviolet bands. The instrument comprises a 50 cm diameter modified Ritchey-Chretien telescope with a 1.25 degree field of view, selectable imaging and objective grism spectroscopic modes, and an innovative optical system with a thin-film multilayer dichroic beam splitter that enables simultaneous imaging by a pair of photon counting, microchannel plate, delay line readout detectors. Initial measurements demonstrate that GALEX is performing well, meeting its requirements for resolution, efficiency, astrometry, bandpass definition and survey sensitivity.
  • We present an analysis of observations of the bright star Altair (alpha Aql) obtained using the star camera on the Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) satellite. Although Altair lies within the delta Scuti instability strip, previous observations have not revealed the presence of oscillations. However, the WIRE observations show Altair to be a low-amplitude (Delta m < 1 ppt) delta Scuti star with at least 7 modes present.
  • The first intensive photometric time-series of a Delta Scuti star was obtained from space. Theta2 Tau was monitored with the star camera on the Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE) satellite. Twelve independent frequencies were detected down to the 0.5 mmag amplitude level. Their reality was investigated by searching for them using two different algorithms and by some internal checks. All the frequencies are in the range 10.8-14.6 c\d. The histogram of the frequency spacings shows that 81% are below 1.8 c\d; rotation may thus play a role in the mode excitation. The fundamental radial mode is not observed, although it is expected to occur in a region where the noise level is very low (55 micromag). The rms residual is about two times lower than that usually obtained from successful ground--based multisite campaigns. The comparison of the results of previous campaigns with the new ones establishes the amplitude variability of some modes.
  • We have used the star camera on the WIRE satellite to observe the K0 III star Alpha UMa, and we report the apparent detection of 10 oscillation modes. The lowest frequency mode is at 1.82 microhertz, and appears to be the fundamental mode. The mean spacing between the mode frequencies is 2.94 microhertz, which implies that all detected modes are radial. The mode frequencies are consistent with the physical parameters of a K0 III star, if we assume that only radial modes are excited. Mode amplitudes are 100 -- 400 micromagnitudes, which is consistent with the scaling relation of Kjeldsen & Beddinge (1995).