• New Experiments With Spheres-Gas (NEWS-G) is a direct dark matter detection experiment using Spherical Proportional Counters (SPCs) with light noble gases to search for low-mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). We report the results from the first physics run taken at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) with SEDINE, a 60 cm diameter prototype SPC operated with a mixture of $\mathrm{Ne}+\mathrm{CH}_{4}$ (0.7 %) at 3.1 bars for a total exposure of $9.7\;\mathrm{kg\cdot days}$. New constraints are set on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross-section in the sub-$\mathrm{GeV/c^2}$ mass region. We exclude cross-sections above $4.4 \times \mathrm{10^{-37}\;cm^2}$ at 90 % confidence level (C.L.) for a 0.5 $\mathrm{GeV/c^2}$ WIMP. The competitive results obtained with SEDINE are promising for the next phase of the NEWS-G experiment: a 140 cm diameter SPC to be installed at SNOLAB by summer 2018.
  • A novel kind of electron beam sustained discharge is presented in which a 12keV electron beam is combined with a 2.45GHz microwave power to excite argon gas at atmospheric pressure in a continuous mode of operation. Optical emission spectroscopy is performed over a wide wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near infrared (NIR). Several effects which modify the emission spectra compared to sole electron beam excitation are observed and interpreted by the changing plasma parameters such as electron density, electron temperature and gas temperature.
  • Transformation of a table-top electron beam sustained 2.45 GHz RF discharge in rare gases into a self burning discharge has been observed for increasing RF-amplitude. Thereby, the emission spectrum undergoes significant changes in a wide spectral range from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near infrared. A strong increase of VUV excimer emission is observed for the self burning discharge. The so called first excimer continuum, in particular, shows a drastic increase in intensity. For argon this effect results in a brilliant light source emitting near the 105 nm short wavelength cutoff of LiF windows. The appearance of a broad-band continuum in the UV and visible range as well as effects of RF excitation on the atomic line radiation and the so called third excimer continuum are briefly described.
  • A spectroscopic study of liquid argon from the vacuum ultraviolet at 110 nm to 1000 nm is presented. Excitation was performed using continuous and pulsed 12 keV electron beams. The emission is dominated by the analogue of the so called 2nd excimer continuum. Various additional emission features were found. The time structure of the light emission has been measured for a set of well defined wavelength positions. The results help to interpret literature data in the context of liquid rare gas detectors in which the wavelength information is lost due to the use of wavelength shifters.
  • The spectral and temporal light emission properties of liquid argon have been studied in the context of its use in large liquid rare-gas detectors for detecting Dark Matter particles in astronomy. A table-top setup has been developed. Continuous and pulsed low energy electron beam excitation is used to stimulate light emission. A spectral range from 110 to 1000 nm in wavelength is covered by the detection system with a time resolution on the order of 1 ns.
  • The scintillation light of liquid argon has been recorded wavelength and time resolved with very good statistics in a wavelength interval ranging from 118 nm through 970 nm. Three different ion beams, protons, sulfur ions and gold ions, were used to excite liquid argon. Only minor differences were observed in the wavelength-spectra obtained with the different incident particles. Light emission in the wavelength range of the third excimer continuum was found to be strongly suppressed in the liquid phase. In time-resolved measurements, the time structure of the scintillation light can be directly attributed to wavelength in our studies, as no wavelength shifter has been used. These measurements confirm that the singlet-to-triplet intensity ratio in the second excimer continuum range is a useful parameter for particle discrimination, which can also be employed in wavelength-integrated measurements as long as the sensitivity of the detector system does not rise steeply for wavelengths longer than 190 nm. Using our values for the singlet-to-triplet ratio down to low energies deposited a discrimination threshold between incident protons and sulfur ions as low as $\sim$2.5 keV seems possible, which represents the principle limit for the discrimination of these two species in liquid argon.
  • Intense infrared (IR) light emission from liquid Ar-Xe mixtures has been observed using 12 keV electron-beam excitation. The emission peaks at a wavelength of 1.18 $\mu$m and the half-width of the emission band is 0.1 $\mu$m. Maximum intensity has been found for a 10 ppm xenon admixture in liquid argon. The conversion efficiency of electron beam-power to IR-light is about 1% (10000 photons per MeV electron energy deposited). A possible application of this intense IR emission for a new particle discrimination concept in liquid noble gas detectors is discussed. No light emission was found for perfectly purified liquid argon in the wavelength range from 0.5 to 3.5 $\mu$m on the current level of sensitivity.
  • Vacuum ultraviolet light emission from xenon-doped liquid argon is described in the context of liquid noble gas particle detectors. Xenon concentrations in liquid argon from 0.1 ppm to 1000 ppm were studied. The energy transfer from the second excimer continuum of argon ($\sim$127 nm) to the second excimer continuum of xenon ($\sim$174 nm) is observed by recording optical emission spectra. The transfer almost saturates at a xenon concentration of $\sim$10 ppm for which, in addition, an intense emission in the infrared at a peak wavelength of 1.17 $\mu$m with (13000$\pm$4000) photons per MeV deposited by electrons had been found. The corresponding value for the VUV emission at a peak wavelength of 174 nm (second excimer continuum of xenon) is determined to be (20000$\pm$6000) photons per MeV electron energy deposited. Under these excitation conditions pure liquid argon emits (22000$\pm$3000) photons per MeV electron energy deposited at a peak wavelength of 127nm. An electron-beam induced emission spectrum for the 10 ppm Ar-Xe liquid mixture ranging from 115 nm to 3.5 $\mu$m is presented. VUV emission spectra from xenon-doped liquid argon with exponentially varied xenon concentrations from 0.1 ppm to 1000 ppm are also shown. Time structure measurements of the light emissions at well-defined wavelength positions in the vacuum ultraviolet as well as in the near-infrared are presented.
  • The transmission of liquid argon has been measured, wavelength resolved, for a wavelength interval from 118 to 250 nm. The wavelength dependent attenuation length is presented for pure argon. It is shown that no universal wavelength independent attenuation length can be assigned to liquid argon for its own fluorescence light due to the interplay between the wavelength dependent emission and absorption. A decreasing transmission is observed below 130 nm in both chemically cleaned and distilled liquid argon and assigned to absorption by the analogue of the first argon excimer continuum. For not perfectly cleaned argon a strong influence of impurities on the transmission is observed. Two strong absorption bands at 126.5 and 141.0 nm with approximately 2 and 4 nm width, respectively, are assigned to traces of xenon in argon. A broad absorption region below 180 nm is found for unpurified argon and tentatively attributed to the presence of water in the argon sample.
  • Results of transmission experiments of vacuum ultraviolet light through a 11.6 cm long cell filled with pure and xenon-doped liquid argon are described. Pure liquid argon shows no attenuation down to the experimental short-wavelength cut-off at 118nm. Based on a conservative approach, a lower limit of 1.10 m for the attenuation length of its own scintillation light could be derived. Adding xenon to liquid argon at concentrations on the order of parts per million leads to strong xenon-related absorption features which are used for a tentative assignment of the recently found near-infrared emission observed in electron-beam excited liquid argon-xenon mixtures. Two of the three absorption features can be explained by perturbed xenon transitions and the third one by a trapped exciton (Wannier-Mott) impurity state. A calibration curve connecting the equivalent width of the absorption line at 140 nm with xenon concentration is provided.
  • The attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon in the context of its application in large liquid noble gas detectors has been studied. Compared to a previous publication several technical issues concerning transmission measurements in general are addressed and several systematic effects were quantitatively measured. Wavelength-resolved transmission measurements have been performed from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near-infrared region. On the current level of sensitivity with a length of the optical path of 11.6 cm, no xenon-related absorption effects could be observed, and pure liquid argon is fully transparent down to the short wavelength cut-off of the experimental setup at 118 nm. A lower limit for the attenuation length of pure liquid argon for its own scintillation light has been estimated to be 1.10 m based on a very conservative approach.