• We observed the galaxy cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 with the Sardinia Radio Telescope to provide new constraints on its spectral properties at high frequency. We conducted observations in three frequency bands centred at 1.4 GHz, 6.6 GHz and 19 GHz, resulting in beam resolutions of 14$^{\prime}$, 2.9$^{\prime}$ and 1$^{\prime}$ respectively. These single-dish data were also combined with archival interferometric observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. From the combined images, we measured a flux density of ${\rm S_{1.4GHz}=(158.3\pm9.6)\,mJy}$ for the central radio halo and ${\rm S_{1.4GHz}=(126\pm8)\,mJy}$ and ${\rm S_{1.4GHz}=(11.7\pm0.7)\,mJy}$ for the northern and the southern relic respectively. After the spectral modelling of the discrete sources, we measured at 6.6 GHz ${\rm S_{6.6GHz}=(17.1\pm1.2)\,mJy}$ and ${\rm S_{6.6GHz}=(0.6\pm0.3)\,mJy}$ for the northern and southern relic respectively. Assuming simple diffusive shock acceleration, we interpret measurements of the northern relic with a continuous injection model represented by a broken power-law. This yields an injection spectral index ${\rm \alpha_{inj}=0.7\pm0.1}$ and a Mach number ${\rm M=3.3\pm0.9}$, consistent with recent X-ray estimates. Unlike other studies of the same object, no significant steepening of the relic radio emission is seen in data up to 8.35 GHz. By fitting the southern relic spectrum with a simple power-law (${\rm S_{\nu}\propto\nu^{-\alpha}}$) we obtained a spectral index ${\rm \alpha\approx1.9}$ corresponding to a Mach number (${\rm M\approx1.8}$) in agreement with X-ray estimates. Finally, we evaluated the rotation measure of the northern relic at 6.6 GHz. These results provide new insights on the magnetic structure of the relic, but further observations are needed to clarify the nature of the observed Faraday rotation.
  • Previous studies have shown that CIZA J2242.8+5301 (the 'Sausage' cluster, $z=0.192$) is a massive merging galaxy cluster that hosts a radio halo and multiple relics. In this paper we present deep, high fidelity, low-frequency images made with the LOw-Frequency Array (LOFAR) between 115.5 and 179 MHz. These images, with a noise of 140 mJy/beam and a resolution of $\theta_{\text{beam}}=7.3"\times5.3"$, are an order of magnitude more sensitive and five times higher resolution than previous low-frequency images of this cluster. We combined the LOFAR data with the existing GMRT (153, 323, 608 MHz) and WSRT (1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 GHz) data to study the spectral properties of the radio emission from the cluster. Assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA), we found Mach numbers of $\mathcal{M}_{n}=2.7{}_{-0.3}^{+0.6}$ and $\mathcal{M}_{s}=1.9_{-0.2}^{+0.3}$ for the northern and southern shocks. The derived Mach number for the northern shock requires an acceleration efficiency of several percent to accelerate electrons from the thermal pool, which is challenging for DSA. Using the radio data, we characterised the eastern relic as a shock wave propagating outwards with a Mach number of $\mathcal{M}_{e}=2.4_{-0.3}^{+0.5}$, which is in agreement with $\mathcal{M}_{e}^{X}=2.5{}_{-0.2}^{+0.6}$ that we derived from Suzaku data. The eastern shock is likely to be associated with the major cluster merger. The radio halo was measured with a flux of $346\pm64\,\text{mJy}$ at $145\,\text{MHz}$. Across the halo, we observed a spectral index that remains approximately constant ($\alpha^{\text{145 MHz-2.3 GHz}}_{\text{across \(\sim\)1 Mpc}^2}=-1.01\pm0.10$) after the steepening in the post-shock region of the northern relic. This suggests a generation of post-shock turbulence that re-energies aged electrons.
  • The new generation of low-frequency radio telescopes, such as the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR: a Square Kilometre Array-low pathfinder), provides advancements in our capability of probing Galactic magnetism through low-frequency polarimetry. Maps of diffuse polarized radio emission and Faraday rotation can be used to infer properties of, and trace structure in, the magnetic fields in the ISM. However, to date very little of the sky has been probed at high angular and Faraday depth resolution. We observed a 5x5 degree region centred on the nearby galaxy IC342 using LOFAR in the frequency range 115-178 MHz at 4 arcmin resolution and performed Faraday tomography to detect foreground Galactic polarized synchrotron emission separated by Faraday depth (different amounts of Faraday rotation). Our Faraday depth cube shows rich polarized structure, with up to 30 K of polarized emission at 150 MHz. We detect two overlapping diffuse polarized features that are clearly separated in Faraday depth. Faraday-thick structures at such low frequencies would be too strongly depolarized to explain the observations and are therefore rejected. Only Faraday thin structures will not be strongly depolarized; producing such structures requires localized variations in the ratio of synchrotron emissivity to Faraday depth per unit distance, which can arise from several physical phenomena, such as a transition between regions of ionized and neutral gas. We conclude that the observed polarized emission is Faraday thin, and propose that the emission originates from two neutral clouds in the local ISM. We have modeled the Faraday rotation for this line of sight and estimated that the line of sight component of magnetic field of the local ISM for this direction varies between -0.86 and +0.12 uG. We propose that this may be a useful method for mapping magnetic fields within the local ISM.
  • We introduce D2O, a Python module for cluster-distributed multi-dimensional numerical arrays. It acts as a layer of abstraction between the algorithm code and the data-distribution logic. The main goal is to achieve usability without losing numerical performance and scalability. D2O's global interface is similar to the one of a numpy.ndarray, whereas the cluster node's local data is directly accessible for use in customized high-performance modules. D2O is written in pure Python which makes it portable and easy to use and modify. Expensive operations are carried out by dedicated external libraries like numpy and mpi4py. The performance of D2O is on a par with numpy for serial applications and scales well when moving to an MPI cluster. D2O is open-source software available under the GNU General Public License v3 (GPL-3) at https://gitlab.mpcdf.mpg.de/ift/D2O
  • We present the first wide area (19 deg$^2$), deep ($\approx120-150$ {\mu}Jy beam$^{-1}$), high resolution ($5.6 \times 7.4$ arcsec) LOFAR High Band Antenna image of the Bo\"otes field made at 130-169 MHz. This image is at least an order of magnitude deeper and 3-5 times higher in angular resolution than previously achieved for this field at low frequencies. The observations and data reduction, which includes full direction-dependent calibration, are described here. We present a radio source catalogue containing 6276 sources detected over an area of $19$\,deg$^2$, with a peak flux density threshold of $5\sigma$. As the first thorough test of the facet calibration strategy, introduced by van Weeren et al., we investigate the flux and positional accuracy of the catalogue. We present differential source counts that reach an order of magnitude deeper in flux density than previously achieved at these low frequencies, and show flattening at 150 MHz flux densities below 10 mJy associated with the rise of the low flux density star-forming galaxies and radio-quiet AGN.
  • We present a new approach to multi-frequency synthesis in radio astronomy. Using Bayesian inference techniques, the new technique estimates the sky brightness and the spectral index simultaneously. In principle, the bandwidth of a wide-band observation can be fully exploited for sensitivity and resolution, currently only limited by higher order effects like spectral curvature. Employing this new approach, we further present a multi-frequency extension to the imaging algorithm RESOLVE. In simulations, this new algorithm outperforms current multi-frequency imaging techniques like MS-MF-CLEAN.
  • We outline the prospects for performing pioneering radio weak gravitational lensing analyses using observations from a potential forthcoming JVLA Sky Survey program. A large-scale survey with the JVLA can offer interesting and unique opportunities for performing weak lensing studies in the radio band, a field which has until now been the preserve of optical telescopes. In particular, the JVLA has the capacity for large, deep radio surveys with relatively high angular resolution, which are the key characteristics required for a successful weak lensing study. We highlight the potential advantages and unique aspects of performing weak lensing in the radio band. In particular, the inclusion of continuum polarisation information can greatly reduce noise in weak lensing reconstructions and can also remove the effects of intrinsic galaxy alignments, the key astrophysical systematic effect that limits weak lensing at all wavelengths. We identify a VLASS "deep fields" program (total area ~10-20 square degs), to be conducted at L-band and with high-resolution (A-array configuration), as the optimal survey strategy from the point of view of weak lensing science. Such a survey will build on the unique strengths of the JVLA and will remain unsurpassed in terms of its combination of resolution and sensitivity until the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. We identify the best fields on the JVLA-accessible sky from the point of view of overlapping with existing deep optical and near infra-red data which will provide crucial redshift information and facilitate a host of additional compelling multi-wavelength science.
  • The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is the most ambitious radio telescope ever planned. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be far superior in sensitivity and observing speed to all current radio facilities. The scientific capability promised by the SKA and its technological challenges provide an ideal base for interdisciplinary research, technology transfer, and collaboration between universities, research centres and industry. The SKA in the radio regime and the European Extreme Large Telescope (E-ELT) in the optical band are on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) and have been recognised as the essential facilities for European research in astronomy. This "White Paper" outlines the German science and R&D interests in the SKA project and will provide the basis for future funding applications to secure German involvement in the Square Kilometre Array.
  • (Abridged) We constrain simulated all-sky maps in total intensity, linear polarization, and rotation measure (RM) by observations. We test a number of large-scale magnetic field configurations and take the properties of the warm interstellar medium into account. From a comparison of simulated and observed maps we are able to constrain the regular large-scale Galactic magnetic field in the disk and the halo of the Galaxy. The local regular field is 2 microG and the average random field is about 3 microG. The known local excess of synchrotron emission originating either from enhanced CR electrons or random magnetic fields is able to explain the observed high-latitude synchrotron emission. The thermal electron model (NE2001) in conjunction with a proper filling factor accounts for the observed optically thin thermal emission and low frequency absorption by optically thick emission. A coupling factor between thermal electrons and the random magnetic field component is proposed, which in addition to the small filling factor of thermal electrons increases small-scale RM fluctuations and thus accounts for the observed depolarization at 1.4 GHz. We conclude that an axisymmetric magnetic disk field configuration with reversals inside the solar circle fits available observations best. Out of the plane a strong toroidal magnetic field with different signs above and below the plane is needed to account for the observed high-latitude RMs. Our preferred 3D-model fits the observations better than other models over a wide frequency range.