• Context: The first Gaia data release (DR1) delivered a catalogue of astrometry and photometry for over a billion astronomical sources. Within the panoply of methods used for data exploration, visualisation is often the starting point and even the guiding reference for scientific thought. However, this is a volume of data that cannot be efficiently explored using traditional tools, techniques, and habits. Aims: We aim to provide a global visual exploration service for the Gaia archive, something that is not possible out of the box for most people. The service has two main goals. The first is to provide a software platform for interactive visual exploration of the archive contents, using common personal computers and mobile devices available to most users. The second aim is to produce intelligible and appealing visual representations of the enormous information content of the archive. Methods: The interactive exploration service follows a client-server design. The server runs close to the data, at the archive, and is responsible for hiding as far as possible the complexity and volume of the Gaia data from the client. This is achieved by serving visual detail on demand. Levels of detail are pre-computed using data aggregation and subsampling techniques. For DR1, the client is a web application that provides an interactive multi-panel visualisation workspace as well as a graphical user interface. Results: The Gaia archive Visualisation Service offers a web-based multi-panel interactive visualisation desktop in a browser tab. It currently provides highly configurable 1D histograms and 2D scatter plots of Gaia DR1 and the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) with linked views. An innovative feature is the creation of ADQL queries from visually defined regions in plots. [abridged]
  • Quantum walks have received a great deal of attention recently because they can be used to develop new quantum algorithms and to simulate interesting quantum systems. In this work, we focus on a model called staggered quantum walk, which employs advanced ideas of graph theory and has the advantage of including the most important instances of other discrete-time models. The evolution operator of the staggered model is obtained from a tessellation cover, which is defined in terms of a set of partitions of the graph into cliques. It is important to establish the minimum number of tessellations required in a tessellation cover, and what classes of graphs admit a small number of tessellations. We describe two main results: (1) infinite classes of graphs where we relate the chromatic number of the clique graph to the minimum number of tessellations required in a tessellation cover, and (2) the problem of deciding whether a graph is $k$-tessellable for $k\ge 3$ is NP-complete.