• The MIGHTEE large survey project will survey four of the most well-studied extragalactic deep fields, totalling 20 square degrees to $\mu$Jy sensitivity at Giga-Hertz frequencies, as well as an ultra-deep image of a single ~1 square degree MeerKAT pointing. The observations will provide radio continuum, spectral line and polarisation information. As such, MIGHTEE, along with the excellent multi-wavelength data already available in these deep fields, will allow a range of science to be achieved. Specifically, MIGHTEE is designed to significantly enhance our understanding of, (i) the evolution of AGN and star-formation activity over cosmic time, as a function of stellar mass and environment, free of dust obscuration; (ii) the evolution of neutral hydrogen in the Universe and how this neutral gas eventually turns into stars after moving through the molecular phase, and how efficiently this can fuel AGN activity; (iii) the properties of cosmic magnetic fields and how they evolve in clusters, filaments and galaxies. MIGHTEE will reach similar depth to the planned SKA all-sky survey, and thus will provide a pilot to the cosmology experiments that will be carried out by the SKA over a much larger survey volume.
  • Deep galaxy surveys have revealed that the global star formation rate (SFR) density in the Universe peaks at 1 < z < 2 and sharply declines towards z = 0. But a clear picture of the underlying processes, in particular the evolution of cold atomic (~100 K) and molecular gas phases, that drive such a strong evolution is yet to emerge. MALS is designed to use MeerKAT's L- and UHF-band receivers to carry out the most sensitive (N(HI)>10$^{19}$ cm$^{-2}$) dust-unbiased search of intervening HI 21-cm and OH 18-cm absorption lines at 0 < z < 2. This will provide reliable measurements of the evolution of cold atomic and molecular gas cross-sections of galaxies, and unravel the processes driving the steep evolution in the SFR density. The large sample of HI and OH absorbers obtained from the survey will (i) lead to tightest constraints on the fundamental constants of physics, and (ii) be ideally suited to probe the evolution of magnetic fields in disks of galaxies via Zeeman Splitting or Rotation Measure synthesis. The survey will also provide an unbiased census of HI and OH absorbers, i.e. cold gas associated with powerful AGNs (>10$^{24}$ W Hz$^{-1}$) at 0 < z < 2, and will simultaneously deliver a blind HI and OH emission line survey, and radio continuum survey. Here, we describe the MALS survey design, observing plan and the science issues to be addressed under various science themes.
  • Measurement of the evolution of both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-formation in galaxies underpins our understanding of galaxy evolution over cosmic time. Radio continuum observations can provide key information on these two processes, in particular via the mechanical feedback produced by radio jets in AGN, and via an unbiased dust-independent measurement of star-formation rates. In this paper we determine radio luminosity functions at 325 MHz for a sample of AGN and star-forming galaxies by matching a 138 deg sq. radio survey conducted with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), with optical imaging and redshifts from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We find that the radio luminosity function at 325 MHz for star-forming galaxies closely follows that measured at 1.4 GHz. By fitting the AGN radio luminosity function out to $z = 0.5$ as a double power law, and parametrizing the evolution as ${\Phi} \propto (1 + z)^{k}$ , we find evolution parameters of $k = 0.92 \pm 0.95$ assuming pure density evolution and $k = 2.13 \pm 1.96$ assuming pure luminosity evolution. We find that the Low Excitation Radio Galaxies are the dominant population in space density at lower luminosities. Comparing our 325 MHz observations with radio continuum imaging at 1.4 GHz, we determine separate radio luminosity functions for steep and flat-spectrum AGN, and show that the beamed population of flat-spectrum sources in our sample can be shifted in number density and luminosity to coincide with the unbeamed population of steep-spectrum sources, as is expected in the orientation based unification of AGN.
  • We apply a cross-correlation technique to infer the $S>3$mJy radio luminosity function (RLF) from the NRAO VLA sky survey (NVSS) to $z\sim3.5$. We measure $\Sigma$ the over density of radio sources around spectroscopically confirmed quasars. $\Sigma$ is related to the space density of radio sources at the distance of the quasars and the clustering strength between the two samples, hence knowledge of one constrains the other. Under simple assumptions we find $\Phi\propto (1+z)^{3.7\pm0.7}$ out to $z\sim2$. Above this redshift the evolution slows and we constrain the evolution exponent to $<1.01$ ($2\sigma$). This behaviour is almost identical to that found by previous authors for the bright end of the RLF potentially indicating that we are looking at the same population. This suggests that the NVSS is dominated by a single population; most likely radio sources associated with high-excitation cold-mode accretion. Inversely, by adopting a previously modelled RLF we can constrain the clustering of high-redshift radio sources and find a clustering strength consistent with $r_0=15.0\pm 2.5$ Mpc up to $z\sim3.5$. This is inconsistent with quasars at low redshift and some measurements of the clustering of bright FRII sources. This behaviour is more consistent with the clustering of lower luminosity radio galaxies in the local universe. Our results indicate that the high-excitation systems dominating our sample are hosted in the most massive galaxies at all redshifts sampled.
  • This is the first paper in a series that present a multi-wavelength analysis of the archetype Ultra-Luminous InfraRed Galaxy (ULIRG) IRAS FSC10214+4724, a gravitationally lensed, starburst/AGN at z=2.3. Here we present a new lens model and spatially-resolved radio data, as well as a deep HST F160W map. The lens modelling employs a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm with extended-source, forward ray-tracing. Using these high resolution HST, MERLIN and VLA maps, the algorithm allows us to constrain the level of distortion to the continuum spectral energy distribution resulting from emission components with differing magnification factors, due to their size and proximity to the caustic. Our lens model finds the narrow line region (NLR), and by proxy the active nucleus, is preferentially magnified. This supports previous claims that preferential magnification could mask the expected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon spectral features in the Spitzer mid-infrared spectrum which roughly trace the star-forming regions. Furthermore, we show the arc-to-counter-image flux ratio is not a good estimate of the magnification in this system, despite its common use in the IRAS FSC10214+4724 literature. Our lens modelling suggests magnifications of \mu ~ 15-20+-2 for the HST F814W, MERLIN 1.7 GHz and VLA 8 GHz maps, significantly lower than the canonical values of \mu = 50-100 often used for this system. Systematic errors such as the dark matter density slope and co-location of stellar and dark matter centroids dominate the uncertainties in the lens model at the 40 percent level.
  • We describe a 325-MHz survey, undertaken with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), which covers a large part of the three equatorial fields at 9, 12 and 14.5 h of right ascension from the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) in the area also covered by the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey (GAMA). The full dataset, after some observed pointings were removed during the data reduction process, comprises 212 GMRT pointings covering ~90 deg^2 of sky. We have imaged and catalogued the data using a pipeline that automates the process of flagging, calibration, self-calibration and source detection for each of the survey pointings. The resulting images have resolutions of between 14 and 24 arcsec and minimum rms noise (away from bright sources) of ~1 mJy/beam, and the catalogue contains 5263 sources brighter than 5 sigma. We investigate the spectral indices of GMRT sources which are also detected at 1.4 GHz and find them to agree broadly with previously published results; there is no evidence for any flattening of the radio spectral index below S_1.4=10 mJy. This work adds to the large amount of available optical and infrared data in the H-ATLAS equatorial fields and will facilitate further study of the low-frequency radio properties of star formation and AGN activity in galaxies out to z~1.
  • We have constructed a sample of radio-loud objects with optical spectroscopy from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) project over the Herschel-ATLAS Phase 1 fields. Classifying the radio sources in terms of their optical spectra, we find that strong-emission-line sources (`high-excitation radio galaxies') have, on average, a factor ~4 higher 250-micron Herschel luminosity than weak-line (`low-excitation') radio galaxies and are also more luminous than magnitude-matched radio-quiet galaxies at the same redshift. Using all five H-ATLAS bands, we show that this difference in luminosity between the emission-line classes arises mostly from a difference in the average dust temperature; strong-emission-line sources tend to have comparable dust masses to, but higher dust temperatures than, radio galaxies with weak emission lines. We interpret this as showing that radio galaxies with strong nuclear emission lines are much more likely to be associated with star formation in their host galaxy, although there is certainly not a one-to-one relationship between star formation and strong-line AGN activity. The strong-line sources are estimated to have star-formation rates at least a factor 3-4 higher than those in the weak-line objects. Our conclusion is consistent with earlier work, generally carried out using much smaller samples, and reinforces the general picture of high-excitation radio galaxies as being located in lower-mass, less evolved host galaxies than their low-excitation counterparts.
  • We investigate the properties (e.g. star formation rate, dust attentuation, stellar mass and metallicity) of a sample of infrared luminous galaxies at z \sim 1 via near-IR spectroscopy with Subaru-FMOS. Our sample consists of Herschel SPIRE and Spitzer MIPS selected sources in the COSMOS field with photometric redshifts in the range 0.7 < z-phot < 1.8, which have been targeted in 2 pointings (0.5 sq. deg.) with FMOS. We find a modest success rate for emission line detections, with candidate H{\alpha} emission lines detected for 57 of 168 SPIRE sources (34 per cent). By stacking the near-IR spectra we directly measure the mean Balmer decrement for the H{\alpha} and H{\beta} lines, finding a value of <E(B-V)> = 0.51\pm0.27 for <LIR> = 10^12 Lsol sources at <z> = 1.36. By comparing star formation rates estimated from the IR and from the dust uncorrected H{\alpha} line we find a strong relationship between dust attenuation and star formation rate. This relation is broadly consistent with that previously seen in star-forming galaxies at z ~ 0.1. Finally, we investigate the metallicity via the N2 ratio, finding that z ~ 1 IR-selected sources are indistinguishable from the local mass-metallicity relation. We also find a strong correlation between dust attentuation and metallicity, with the most metal-rich IR-sources experiencing the largest levels of dust attenuation.
  • The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) provides an unprecedented opportunity to search for blazars at sub-mm wavelengths. We cross-matched the FIRST radio source catalogue with the 11655 sources brighter than 35 mJy at 500{\mu}m in the \sim 135 square degrees of the sky covered by the H-ATLAS equatorial fields at 9 h and 15 h, plus half of the field at 12 h. We found that 379 of the H-ATLAS sources have a FIRST counterpart within 10 arcsec, including 8 catalogued blazars (plus one known blazar that was found at the edge of one the H-ATLAS maps). To search for additional blazar candidates we have devised new diagnostic diagrams and found that known blazars occupy a region of the log(S500{\mu}m/S350{\mu}m) vs. log(S500{\mu}m/S1.4GHz) plane separated from that of the other sub-mm sources with radio counterparts. Using this diagnostic we have selected 12 further candidates that turn out to be scattered in the (r-z) vs. (u-r) plane or in the WISE colour-colour diagram proposed by Massaro et al. (2012), where known blazars are concentrated in well defined strips. This suggests that the majority of them either are not blazars or have spectral energy distributions contaminated by their host galaxies. A significant fraction of true blazars are found to be hosted by star-forming galaxies. This finding, supported by an analysis of blazars detected in Planck 545 and 857 GHz bands, is at odds with the notion that blazar hosts are passive ellipticals and indicates that the sub-mm selection is providing a novel prospect on blazar properties. Based on an inspection of the available photometric data, including the WISE all-sky survey, the unpublished VIKING survey and new radio observations, we tentatively estimate that there are 11 blazars with synchrotron flux density S500{\mu}m > 35mJy over the considered area. This result already allows us to constrain blazar evolution models.
  • We use the Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration data to investigate the star-formation properties of radio-selected galaxies in the GAMA-9h field as a function of radio luminosity and redshift. Radio selection at the lowest radio luminosities, as expected, selects mostly starburst galaxies. At higher radio luminosities, where the population is dominated by AGN, we find that some individual objects are associated with high far-infrared luminosities. However, the far-infrared properties of the radio-loud population are statistically indistinguishable from those of a comparison population of radio-quiet galaxies matched in redshift and K-band absolute magnitude. There is thus no evidence that the host galaxies of these largely low-luminosity (Fanaroff-Riley class I), and presumably low-excitation, AGN, as a population, have particularly unusual star-formation histories. Models in which the AGN activity in higher-luminosity, high-excitation radio galaxies is triggered by major mergers would predict a luminosity-dependent effect that is not seen in our data (which only span a limited range in radio luminosity) but which may well be detectable with the full Herschel-ATLAS dataset.
  • To investigate the poorly constrained sub-mm counts and spectral properties of blazars we searched for these in the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) science demostration phase (SDP) survey catalog. We cross-matched 500$\mu$m sources brighter than 50 mJy with the FIRST radio catalogue. We found two blazars, both previously known. Our study is among the first blind blazar searches at sub-mm wavelengths, i.e., in the spectral regime where little is still known about the blazar SEDs, but where the synchrotron peak of the most luminous blazars is expected to occur. Our early results are consistent with educated extrapolations of lower frequency counts and question indications of substantial spectral curvature downwards and of spectral upturns at mm wavelengths. One of the two blazars is identified with a Fermi/LAT $\gamma$-ray source and a WMAP source. The physical parameters of the two blazars are briefly discussed.These observations demonstrate that the H-ATLAS survey will provide key information about the physics of blazars and their contribution to sub-mm counts.
  • To exploit synergies between the Herschel Space Observatory and next generation radio facilities, we have extended the semi-empirical extragalactic radio continuum simulation of Wilman et al. (2008) to the mid- and far-infrared. Here we describe the assignment of infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to the star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei, using Spitzer 24, 70 and 160 micron and SCUBA 850 micron survey results as the main constraints. Star-forming galaxies dominate the source counts, and a model in which their far-infrared-radio correlation and infrared SED assignment procedure are invariant with redshift underpredicts the observed 24 and 70 micron source counts. The 70 micron deficit can be eliminated if the star-forming galaxies undergo stronger luminosity evolution than originally assumed for the radio simulation, a requirement which may be partially ascribed to known non-linearity in the far-infrared--radio correlation at low luminosity if it evolves with redshift. At 24 micron, the shortfall is reduced if the star-forming galaxies develop SEDs with cooler dust and correspondingly stronger Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features with increasing redshift at a given far-infrared luminosity, but this trend may reverse at z>1 in order not to overproduce the sub-mm source counts. The resulting model compares favourably with recent BLAST results and we have extended the simulation database to aid the interpretation of Herschel surveys. Such comparisons may also facilitate further model refinement and revised predictions for the SKA and its precursors.
  • We have developed a semi-empirical simulation of the extragalactic radio continuum sky suitable for aiding the design of next generation radio interferometers such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The emphasis is on modelling the large-scale cosmological distribution of radio sources rather than the internal details of individual galaxies. Here we provide a description of the simulation to accompany the online release of a catalogue of 320 million simulated radio sources. The simulation covers 20x20 deg^2 - a plausible upper limit to the instantaneous field of view attainable with future (e.g. SKA) aperture array technologies - out to redshift z=20, and down to flux density limits of 10 nJy at 151, 610 MHz, 1.4, 4.86 and 18 GHz. Five distinct source types are included: radio-quiet AGN, radio-loud AGN of the FRI and FRII structural classes, and star-forming galaxies, the latter split into populations of quiescent and starbursting galaxies. In our semi-empirical approach, the simulated sources are drawn from observed (or extrapolated) luminosity functions and grafted onto an underlying dark matter density field with biases which reflect their measured large-scale clustering. A numerical Press-Schechter-style filtering of the density field is used to identify and populate clusters of galaxies. Radio source structures are built from point source and elliptical sub-components, and for FRI and FRII sources an orientation-based unification and beaming model is used to partition flux between the core and extended lobes and hotspots. The simulation output can be post-processed to achieve more complete agreement with observational data in the years ahead, with the aim of using these 'idealised skies' in telescope simulators to optimise the design of the SKA itself (abridged).
  • We present results and analysis for the 2m spectroscopic part of the MultiSite Spectroscopic Telescope (MSST) campaign undertaken in May/June 2002. The goal of the project was to observe the pulsating subdwarf B star PG1605+072 simultaneously in velocity and photometry and to resolve as many of the >50 known modes as possible, which will allow a detailed asteroseismological analysis. We have obtained over 150 hours of spectroscopy, leading to an unprecedented noise level of only 207m/s. We report here the detection of 20 frequencies in velocity, with two more likely just below our detection threshold. In particular, we detect 6 linear combinations, making PG1605+072 only the second star known to show such frequencies in velocity. We investigate the phases of these combinations and their parent modes and find relationships between them that cannot be easily understood based on current theory. These observations, when combined with our simultaneous photometry, should allow asteroseismology of this most complicated of sdB pulsators.
  • This paper is the second in a series describing the Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) being carried out at 843MHz with the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST). The survey will consist of ~590 4.3deg. x 4.3deg. mosaic images with 45"x45"cosec|dec.| resolution, and a source catalogue. In this paper we describe the initial release (version 1.0) of the source catalogue consisting of 107,765 radio sources made by fitting elliptical gaussians in 271 SUMSS mosaics to a limiting peak brightness of 6mJy/beam at dec.<=-50deg. and 10mJy/beam at dec.>-50deg.. The catalogue covers approximately 3500deg^2 of the southern sky with dec.<=-30deg., about 43 per cent of the total survey area. Positions in the catalogue are accurate to within 1"-2" for sources with peak brightness A>=20mJy/beam and are always better than 10". The internal flux density scale is accurate to within 3 per cent. Image artefacts have been classified using a decision tree, which correctly identifies and rejects spurious sources in over 96 per cent of cases. Analysis of the catalogue shows that it is highly uniform and is complete to 8mJy at dec.<=-50^deg. and 18mJy at dec.>-50deg.. In this release of the catalogue about 7000 sources are found in the overlap region with the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) at 1.4GHz. We calculate a median spectral index of alpha=-0.83 between 1.4GHz and 843MHz. This version of the catalogue will be released via the World Wide Web with future updates as new mosaics are released.