• A new set of low-resolution spectral and UBVJHKL-photometric observations of the symbiotic nova PU Vul is presented. The binary has been still evolving after the symbiotic nova outburst in 1977 and now it's in the nebular stage. It is found that the third orbital cycle (after 1977) was characterized by great changes in light curves. Now PU Vul demonstrates a sine-wave shape of all light curves (with an amplitude in the U band of about 0.7 mag), which is typical for symbiotic stars in quiescent state. Brightness variability due to cool component pulsations is now clearly visible in the VRI light curves. The amplitude of the pulsations increases from 0.5 mag in V band to 0.8 mag in I band. These two types of variability, as well as a very slow change of the hot component physical parameters due to evolution after the outburst of 1979, influence the spectral energy distribution of the system. The emission lines variability is highly complex. Only hydrogen lines fluxes vary with orbital phase. An important feature of the third orbital cycle is the first appearance of the OVI, 6828A Raman scattering line. We determined the hot component temperature by means of Zanstra method applied to the He II, 4686 line. Our estimate is about 150000 K for the spectrum obtained near orbital maximum in 2014. The VO spectral index derived near pulsation minimum corresponds to M6 spectral class for the cool component of PU Vul.
  • AG Peg is known as the slowest symbiotic nova, which experienced its nova-like outburst around 1850. After 165 years, during June of 2015, it erupted again showing characteristics of the Z And-type outburst. The primary objective is to determine basic characteristics, the nature and type of the 2015 outburst of AG Peg. We achieved this aim by modelling the spectral energy distribution using low-resolution spectroscopy (330-750 nm), medium-resolution spectroscopy (420-720 nm; R=11000), and $UBVR_{\rm C}I_{\rm C}$ photometry covering the 2015 outburst with a high cadence. Optical observations were complemented with the archival HST and FUSE spectra from the preceding quiescence. During the outburst, the luminosity of the hot component was in the range of 2-11$\times 10^{37}(d/0.8{\rm kpc})^2$ erg/s. To generate the maximum luminosity the white dwarf (WD) had to accrete at $\sim 3\times 10^{-7}$ M$_{\odot}yr^{-1}$, which exceeds the stable-burning limit and thus led to blowing optically thick wind from the WD. We determined its mass-loss rate to a few $\times 10^{-6}$ M$_{\odot}yr^{-1}$. At the high temperature of the ionising source, $1.5-2.3\times 10^5$ K, the wind converted a fraction of the WD's photospheric radiation into the nebular emission that dominated the optical. A one order of magnitude increase of the emission measure, from a few $\times 10^{59}(d/0.8 {\rm kpc})^2$ cm$^{-3}$ during quiescence, to a few $\times 10^{60}(d/0.8\,{\rm kpc})^2$ cm$^{-3}$ during the outburst, caused a 2 mag brightening in the LC, which is classified as the Z And-type of the outburst. The very high nebular emission and the presence of a disk-like HI region encompassing the WD, as indicated by a significant broadening and high flux of the Raman-scattered OVI 6825 \AA\ line during the outburst, is consistent with the ionisation structure of hot components in symbiotic stars during active phases.
  • Spectroscopic observations of the hybrid V458 Vul obtained between days 9 and 778 after the brightness maximum are analyzed. Short-period, daily profile variations of forbidden [FeVII] iron lines were detected in the nebular phase, as well as a long-period (about 60-day) cyclic variation that was correlated with the photometric and X-ray cycles. The abundances of helium, neon, and iron in the nova's envelope have been estimated. The helium, neon, and iron abundances exceed the solar values by factors of 4.4, 4.8, and 3.7. The envelope mass is 1.4$\times$ 10$^{-5}$M$_{\odot}$. The electron temperatures and number densities have been calculated for the Northwestern and Southeastern knots of the planetary nebula. The temperature derived for the Northwestern knot is Te = 10 000 K and the electron number density, n$_{e}$ = 600 cm $^{-3}$ for the Southeastern knot, Te = 13 000 K and n$_{e}$ = 750 cm$^{-3}$.
  • We determine the temporal evolution of the luminosity L(WD), radius R(WD) and effective temperature Teff of the white dwarf (WD) pseudophotosphere of V339 Del from its discovery to around day 40. Another main objective was studying the ionization structure of the ejecta. These aims were achieved by modelling the optical/near-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) using low-resolution spectroscopy (3500 - 9200 A), UBVRcIc and JHKLM photometry. During the fireball stage (Aug. 14.8 - 19.9, 2013), Teff was in the range of 6000 - 12000 K, R(WD) was expanding non-uniformly in time from around 66 to around 300 (d/3 kpc) R(Sun), and L(WD) was super-Eddington, but not constant. After the fireball stage, a large emission measure of 1.0-2.0E+62 (d/3 kpc)**2 cm**(-3) constrained the lower limit of L(WD) to be well above the super-Eddington value. The evolution of the H-alpha line and mainly the transient emergence of the Raman-scattered O VI 1032 A line suggested a biconical ionization structure of the ejecta with a disk-like H I region persisting around the WD until its total ionization, around day 40. It is evident that the nova was not evolving according to the current theoretical prediction. The unusual non-spherically symmetric ejecta of nova V339 Del and its extreme physical conditions and evolution during and after the fireball stage represent interesting new challenges for the theoretical modelling of the nova phenomenon.
  • We present an analysis of spectrophotometric observations of the latest cycle of activity of the symbiotic binary Z And from 2006 to 2010. We estimate the temperature of the hot component of Z And to be \approx 150000 - 170000 K at minimum brightness, decreasing to \approx 90000 K at the brightness maximum. Our estimate of the electron density in the gaseous nebula is N_{e}=10^{10}-10^{12} cm^{-3} in the region of formation of lines of neutral helium and 10^6-10^7 cm^{-3} in the region of formation of the [OIII] and [NeIII] nebular lines. A trend for the gas density derived from helium lines to increase and the gas density derived from [OIII] and [NeIII] lines to simultaneously decrease with increasing brightness of the system was observed. Our estimates show that the ratios of the theoretical and observed fluxes in the [OIII] and [NeIII] lines agree best when the O/Ne ratio is similar to its value for planetary nebulae. The model spectral energy distribution showed that, in addition to a cool component and gaseous nebula, a relatively cool pseudophotosphere (5250-11 500 K) is present in the system. The simultaneous presence of a relatively cool pseudophotosphere and high-ionization spectral lines is probably related to a disk-like structure of the pseudophotosphere. The pseudophotosphere formed very rapidly, over several weeks, during a period of increasing brightness of Z And. We infer that in 2009, as in 2006, the activity of the system was accompanied by a collimated bipolar ejection of matter. In contrast to the situation in 2006, the jets were detected even before the system reached its maximum brightness. Moreover, components with velocities close to 1200 km/s disappeared at the maximum, while those with velocities close to 1800 km/s appeared.
  • AX Per is an eclipsing symbiotic binary. During active phases, deep narrow minima are observed in its light curve, and the ionization structure in the binary changes significantly. From 2007.5, AX Per entered a new active phase. It was connected with a significant enhancement of the hot star wind. Simultaneously, we identified a variable optically thick warm (Teff ~ 6000 K) source that contributes markedly to the composite spectrum. The source was located at the hot star's equator and has the form of a flared disk, whose outer rim simulates the warm photosphere. The formation of the neutral disk-like zone around the accretor during the active phase was connected with its enhanced wind. We suggested that this connection represents a common origin of the warm pseudophotospheres that are indicated during the active phases of symbiotic stars.