• Massive stars play a significant role in the chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies. However, much of their variability, particularly during their evolved supergiant stage, is poorly understood. To understand the variability of evolved massive stars in more detail, we present a study of the O9.2Ib supergiant $\zeta$ Ori Aa, the only currently confirmed supergiant to host a magnetic field. We have obtained two-color space-based BRIght Target Explorer photometry (BRITE) for $\zeta$ Ori Aa during two observing campaigns, as well as simultaneous ground-based, high-resolution optical CHIRON spectroscopy. We perform a detailed frequency analysis to detect and characterize the star's periodic variability. We detect two significant, independent frequencies, their higher harmonics, and combination frequencies: the stellar rotation period $P_{\mathrm{rot}} = 6.82\pm0.18$ d, most likely related to the presence of the stable magnetic poles, and a variation with a period of $10.0\pm0.3$ d attributed to circumstellar environment, also detected in the H$\alpha$ and several He I lines, yet absent in the purely photospheric lines. We confirm the variability with $P_{\mathrm{rot}}$/4, likely caused by surface inhomogeneities, being the possible photospheric drivers of the discrete absorption components. No stellar pulsations were detected in the data. The level of circumstellar activity clearly differs between the two BRITE observing campaigns. We demonstrate that $\zeta$ Ori Aa is a highly variable star with both periodic and non-periodic variations, as well as episodic events. The rotation period we determined agrees well with the spectropolarimetric value from the literature. The changing activity level observed with BRITE could explain why the rotational modulation of the magnetic measurements was not clearly detected at all epochs.
  • {\iota} Ori is a well studied massive binary consisting of an O9 III + B1 III/IV star. Due to its high eccentricity (e = 0.764) and short orbital period (P orb = 29.13376 d), it has been considered to be a good candidate to show evidence of tidal effects; however, none have previously been identified. Using photometry from the BRITE-Constellation space photometry mission we have confirmed the existence of tidal distortions through the presence of a heartbeat signal at periastron. We combine spectroscopic and light curve analyses to measure the masses and radii of the components, revealing {\iota} Ori to be the most massive heartbeat system known to date. In addition, using a thorough frequency analysis, we also report the unprecedented discovery of multiple tidally induced oscillations in an O star. The amplitudes of the pulsations allow us to empirically estimate the tidal circularization rate, yielding an effective tidal quality factor Q $\approx 4 \times 10^{4}$ .
  • We studied the variability of the magnetic O-type supergiant $\zeta$ Ori Aa using multi-colour BRITE photometry. We confirmed the known rotation frequency $f_{\rm rot} = 0.15 \pm 0.02$ c/d, and detected some of its higher harmonics, of which $4f_{\rm rot}$ is compatible with the known DAC recurrence timescale. Thanks to simultaneous high-resolution CHIRON spectroscopy, we could identify another frequency $f_{\rm env} = 0.10 \pm 0.02$ c/d, caused by the circumstellar environment. Variations in the circumstellar environment are believed to cause the observed difference between the BRITE lightcurves.
  • We report a simultaneous ground and space-based photometric study of the Beta Cephei star Nu Eridani. Half a year of observations have been obtained by four of the five satellites constituting BRITE-Constellation, supplemented with ground-based photoelectric photometry. We show that carefully combining the two data sets virtually eliminates the aliasing problem that often hampers time-series analyses. We detect 40 periodic signals intrinsic to the star in the light curves. Despite a lower detection limit we do not recover all the pressure and mixed modes previously reported in the literature, but we newly detect six additional gravity modes. This behaviour is a consequence of temporal changes in the pulsation amplitudes that we also detected for some of the p modes. We point out that the dependence of theoretically predicted pulsation amplitude on wavelength is steeper in visual passbands than those observationally measured, to the extent that the three dominant pulsation modes of Nu Eridani would be incorrectly identified using data in optical filters only. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy.
  • BRITE (BRIght Target Explorer) Constellation, the first nanosatellite mission applied to astrophysical research, is a collaboration among Austria, Canada and Poland. The fleet of satellites (6 launched, 5 functioning) performs precise optical photometry of the brightest stars in the night sky. A pioneering mission like BRITE - with optics and instruments restricted to small volume, mass and power in several nanosatellites, whose measurements must be coordinated in orbit - poses many unique challenges. We discuss the technical issues, including problems encountered during on-orbit commissioning (especially higher-than expected sensitivity of the CCDs to particle radiation). We describe in detail how the BRITE team has mitigated these problems, and provide a complete overview of mission operations. This paper serves as a template for how to effectively plan, build and operate future low-cost niche-driven space astronomy missions.
  • During the summer of 2013, a 4-month spectroscopic campaign took place to observe the variabilities in three Wolf-Rayet stars. The spectroscopic data have been analyzed for WR 134 (WN6b), to better understand its behaviour and long-term periodicity, which we interpret as arising from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind. By analyzing the variability of the He II $\lambda$5411 emission line, the previously identified period was refined to P = 2.255 $\pm$ 0.008 (s.d.) days. The coherency time of the variability, which we associate with the lifetime of the CIRs in the wind, was deduced to be 40 $\pm$ 6 days, or $\sim$ 18 cycles, by cross-correlating the variability patterns as a function of time. When comparing the phased observational grayscale difference images with theoretical grayscales previously calculated from models including CIRs in an optically thin stellar wind, we find that two CIRs were likely present. A separation in longitude of $\Delta \phi \simeq$ 90$^{\circ}$ was determined between the two CIRs and we suggest that the different maximum velocities that they reach indicate that they emerge from different latitudes. We have also been able to detect observational signatures of the CIRs in other spectral lines (C IV $\lambda\lambda$5802,5812 and He I $\lambda$5876). Furthermore, a DAC was found to be present simultaneously with the CIR signatures detected in the He I $\lambda$5876 emission line which is consistent with the proposed geometry of the large-scale structures in the wind. Small-scale structures also show a presence in the wind, simultaneously with the larger scale structures, showing that they do in fact co-exist.
  • This paper aims to precisely determine the masses and detect pulsation modes in the two massive components of Beta Cen with BRITE-Constellation photometry. In addition, seismic models for the components are considered and the effects of fast rotation are discussed. This is done to test the limitations of seismic modeling for this very difficult case. A simultaneous fit of visual and spectroscopic orbits is used to self-consistently derive the orbital parameters, and subsequently the masses, of the components. The derived masses are equal to 12.02 +/- 0.13 and 10.58 +/- 0.18 M_Sun. The parameters of the wider, A - B system, presently approaching periastron passage, are constrained. Analysis of the combined blue- and red-filter BRITE-Constellation photometric data of the system revealed the presence of 19 periodic terms, of which eight are likely g modes, nine are p modes, and the remaining two are combination terms. It cannot be excluded that one or two low-frequency terms are rotational frequencies. It is possible that both components of Beta Cen are Beta Cep/SPB hybrids. An attempt to use the apparent changes of frequency to distinguish which modes originate in which component did not succeed, but there is potential for using this method when more BRITE data become available. Agena seems to be one of very few rapidly rotating massive objects with rich p- and g-mode spectra, and precisely known masses. It can therefore be used to gain a better understanding of the excitation of pulsations in relatively rapidly rotating stars and their seismic modeling. Finally, this case illustrates the potential of BRITE-Constellation data for the detection of rich-frequency spectra of small-amplitude modes in massive pulsating stars.
  • We report on an analysis of high-precision, multi-colour photometric observations of the rapidly-oscillating Ap (roAp) star $\alpha$ Cir. These observations were obtained with the BRITE-Constellation, which is a coordinated mission of five nanosatellites that collects continuous millimagnitude-precision photometry of dozens of bright stars for up to 180 days at a time in two colours (Johnson B and R). BRITE stands for BRight Target Explorer. The object $\alpha$ Cir is the brightest roAp star and an ideal target for such investigations, facilitating the determination of oscillation frequencies with high resolution. This star is bright enough for complementary interferometry and time-resolved spectroscopy. Four BRITE satellites observed $\alpha$ Cir for 146 d or 33 rotational cycles. Phasing the photometry according to the 4.4790 d rotational period reveals qualitatively different light variations in the two photometric bands. The phased red-band photometry is in good agreement with previously-published WIRE data, showing a light curve symmetric about phase 0.5 with a strong contribution from the first harmonic. The phased blue-band data, in contrast, show an essentially sinusoidal variation. We model both light curves with Bayesian Photometric Imaging, which suggests the presence of two large-scale, photometrically bright (relative to the surrounding photosphere) spots. We also examine the high-frequency pulsation spectrum as encoded in the BRITE photometry. Our analysis establishes the stability of the main pulsation frequency over the last 20 years, confirms the presence of frequency f7, which was not detected (or the mode not excited) prior to 2006, and excludes quadrupolar modes for the main pulsation frequency.