• Context. Investigations of the magnetism of the quiet Sun are hindered by extremely weak polarization signals in Fraunhofer spectral lines. Photon noise, straylight, and the systematically different sensitivity of the Zeeman effect to longitudinal and transversal magnetic fields result in controversial results in terms of the strength and angular distribution of the magnetic field vector. Aims. The information content of Stokes measurements close to the diffraction limit of the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope is analyzed. We took the effects of spatial straylight and photon noise into account. Methods. Highly sensitive full Stokes measurements of a quiet-Sun region at disk center in the deep photospheric Fe I lines in the 1.56 {\mu}m region were obtained with the infrared spectropolarimeter GRIS at the GREGOR telescope. Noise statistics and Stokes V asymmetries were analyzed and compared to a similar data set of the Hinode spectropolarimeter (SOT/SP). Simple diagnostics based directly on the shape and strength of the profiles were applied to the GRIS data. We made use of the magnetic line ratio technique, which was tested against MHD simulations. Results. About 80% of the GRIS spectra of a very quiet solar region show polarimetric signals above a 3{\sigma} level. Area and amplitude asymmetries agree well with small-scale surface dynamo MHD simulations. The magnetic line ratio analysis reveals ubiquitous magnetic regions in the ten to hundred Gauss range with some concentrations of kilo-Gauss fields. Conclusions. The GRIS spectropolarimetric data at a spatial resolution of 0.40" are so far unique in the combination of high spatial resolution scans and high magnetic field sensitivity. Nevertheless, the unavoidable effect of spatial straylight and the resulting dilution of the weak Stokes profiles means that inversion techniques still bear a high risk of misinterpretating the data.
  • We present simultaneous photospheric and chromospheric observations of the trailing sunspot in NOAA 10904 during a weak flare eruption (GOES magnitude B7.8), obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST) in La Palma, Canary Islands. High-resolution \ion{Ca}{ii} $H$ images show a typical two-ribbon structure that has been hitherto only known for larger flares, and the flare appears in a confined region that is discernible by a bright border. The underlying photosphere shows a disturbed penumbral structure with intersecting branches of penumbral filaments. High-resolution Doppler- and vector-magnetograms exhibit oppositely directed Evershed flows and magnetic field vectors in the individual penumbral branches, resulting in several regions of magnetic azimuth discontinuity and several islands where the vertical magnetic field is reversed. The discontinuity regions are co-spatial with the locations of the onset of the flare ribbons. From the results, we conclude that the confined flare region is detached from the global magnetic field structure by a separatrix marked by the bright border visible in \ion{Ca}{ii} $H$. We further conclude that the islands of reversed vertical field appear because of flux emergence and that the strong magnetic shear appearing in the regions of magnetic azimuth discontinuity triggers the flare.