• We calculate the star formation quenching timescales in green valley galaxies at intermediate redshifts ($z\sim0.5-1$) using stacked zCOSMOS spectra of different galaxy morphological types: spheroidal, disk-like, irregular and merger, dividing disk-like galaxies further into unbarred, weakly-barred and strongly-barred, assuming a simple exponentially-decaying star formation history model and based on the H$_{\delta}$ absorption feature and the $4000$ \AA ~break. We find that different morphological types present different star formation quenching timescales, reinforcing the idea that the galaxy morphology is strongly correlated with the physical processes responsible for quenching star formation. Our quantification of the star formation quenching timescale indicates that disks have typical timescales $60\%$ to 5 times longer than that of galaxies presenting spheroidal, irregular or merger morphologies. Barred galaxies in particular present the slowest transition timescales through the green valley. This suggests that although secular evolution may ultimately lead to gas exhaustion in the host galaxy via bar-induced gas inflows that trigger star formation activity, secular agents are not major contributors in the rapid quenching of galaxies at these redshifts. Galaxy interaction, associated with the elliptical, irregular and merger morphologies contribute, to a more significant degree, to the fast transition through the green valley at these redshifts. In the light of previous works suggesting that both secular and merger processes are responsible for the star formation quenching at low redshifts, our results provide an explanation to the recent findings that star formation quenching happened at a faster pace at $z\sim0.8$.
  • We present $^{12}$CO(1-0) and $^{12}$CO(2-1) observations of a sample of 20 star-forming dwarfs selected from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, with oxygen abundances ranging from 12 + log(O/H) ~ 8.1 to 8.8. CO emission is observed in ten galaxies and marginally detected in another one. CO fluxes correlate with the FIR 250 $\mu$m emission, and the dwarfs follow the same linear relation that holds for more massive spiral galaxies extended to a wider dynamical range. We compare different methods to estimate H2 molecular masses, namely a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and one dependent on H-band luminosity. The molecular-to-stellar mass ratio remains nearly constant at stellar masses <~ 10$^9$ M$_{\odot}$, contrary to the atomic hydrogen fraction, M$_{HI}$/M$_*$, which increases inversely with M$_*$. The flattening of the M$_{H_2}$/M$_*$ ratio at low stellar masses does not seem to be related to the effects of the cluster environment because it occurs for both HI-deficient and HI-normal dwarfs. The molecular-to-atomic ratio is more tightly correlated with stellar surface density than metallicity, confirming that the interstellar gas pressure plays a key role in determining the balance between the two gaseous components of the interstellar medium. Virgo dwarfs follow the same linear trend between molecular gas mass and star formation rate as more massive spirals, but gas depletion timescales, $\tau_{dep}$, are not constant and range between 100 Myr and 6 Gyr. The interaction with the Virgo cluster environment is removing the atomic gas and dust components of the dwarfs, but the molecular gas appears to be less affected at the current stage of evolution within the cluster. However, the correlation between HI deficiency and the molecular gas depletion time suggests that the lack of gas replenishment from the outer regions of the disc is lowering the star formation activity.
  • Lyman break analogues (LBAs) are a population of star-forming galaxies at low redshift (z ~ 0.2) selected in the ultraviolet (UV). These objects present higher star formation rates and lower dust extinction than other galaxies with similar masses and luminosities in the local universe. In this work we present results from a survey with the Combined Array for Research in Millimetre-wave Astronomy (CARMA) to detect CO(1-0) emission in LBAs, in order to analyse the properties of the molecular gas in these galaxies. Our results show that LBAs follow the same Schmidt-Kennicutt law as local galaxies. On the other hand, they have higher gas fractions (up to 66%) and faster gas depletion time-scales (below 1 Gyr). These characteristics render these objects more akin to high-redshift star-forming galaxies. We conclude that LBAs are a great nearby laboratory for studying the cold interstellar medium in low-metallicity, UV-luminous compact star-forming galaxies.
  • Measuring the response of the intergalactic medium to a blast of ionizing radiation allows one to infer the physical properties of the medium and, in principle, the lifetime and isotropy of the radiating source. The most sensitive such measurements can be made if the source of radiation is near the line of sight to a bright background QSO. We present results based on deep Keck/HIRES observations of the QSO triplet KP76, KP77 and KP78 at z ~2.5, with separations of 2-3 arcmin on the plane of the sky. Using accurate systemic redshifts of the QSOs from near-IR spectroscopy, we quantify the state of the IGM gas in the proximity regions where the expected ionizing flux from the foreground QSOs exceeds that of the metagalactic background by factors of 10-200, assuming constant and isotropic emission. Based on the unusual ionization properties of the absorption systems with detected HI, CIV, and OVI, we conclude that the gas has been significantly affected by the UV radiation from the nearby QSOs. Aided by observations of the galaxy density near the foreground QSOs, we discuss several effects that may explain why the transverse proximity effect has eluded most previous attempts to detect it. Our observations suggest that the luminosities of KP76 and KP77 have remained comparable to current values over timescales of, respectively, Delta t > 25 Myr and 16 Myr < Delta t < 33 Myr - consistent with typical QSO lifetimes estimated from independent, less-direct methods. There is no evidence that the UV radiation from either QSO was significantly anisotropic during these intervals.
  • In this paper we present an objectively defined catalog of 459 small, high density groups of galaxies out to z~0.2 in a region of 6260 square degrees in the northern sky derived from the Digitized Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Our catalog extends down to r = 19.0 and has a median redshift of z_med = 0.12, making it complementary to Hickson's catalog for the nearby universe (z_med = 0.03). The depth and angular coverage of this catalog makes it valuable for studies of the general characteristics of small groups of galaxies and how galaxies evolve in and around them. We also examine the relationship between compact groups and large scale structure.