• We present the first quantitative detection of large-scale filamentary structure at $z \simeq 0.7$ in the large cosmological volume probed by the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). We use simulations to show the capability of VIPERS to recover robust topological features in the galaxy distribution, in particular the filamentary network. We then investigate how galaxies with different stellar masses and stellar activities are distributed around the filaments and find a significant segregation, with the most massive or quiescent galaxies being closer to the filament axis than less massive or active galaxies. The signal persists even after down-weighting the contribution of peak regions. Our results suggest that massive and quiescent galaxies assemble their stellar mass through successive mergers during their migration along filaments towards the nodes of the cosmic web. On the other hand, low-mass star-forming galaxies prefer the outer edge of filaments, a vorticity rich region dominated by smooth accretion, as predicted by the recent spin alignment theory. This emphasizes the role of large scale cosmic flows in shaping galaxy properties.
  • We perform a detailed comparison of the phase-space density traced by the particle distribution in Gadget simulations to the result obtained with a spherical Vlasov solver using the splitting algorithm. The systems considered are apodized H\'enon spheres with two values of the virial ratio, R ~ 0.1 and 0.5. After checking that spherical symmetry is well preserved by the N-body simulations, visual and quantitative comparisons are performed. In particular we introduce new statistics, correlators and entropic estimators, based on the likelihood of whether N-body simulations actually trace randomly the Vlasov phase-space density. When taking into account the limits of both the N-body and the Vlasov codes, namely collective effects due to the particle shot noise in the first case and diffusion and possible nonlinear instabilities due to finite resolution of the phase-space grid in the second case, we find a spectacular agreement between both methods, even in regions of phase-space where nontrivial physical instabilities develop. However, in the colder case, R=0.1, it was not possible to prove actual numerical convergence of the N-body results after a number of dynamical times, even with N=10$^8$ particles.
  • Pillars and globules are present in many high-mass star-forming regions, such as the Eagle nebula (M16) and the Rosette molecular cloud, and understanding their origin will help characterize triggered star formation. The formation mechanisms of these structures are still being debated. Recent numerical simulations have shown how pillars can arise from the collapse of the shell in on itself and how globules can be formed from the interplay of the turbulent molecular cloud and the ionization from massive stars. The goal here is to test this scenario through recent observations of two massive star-forming regions, M16 and Rosette. The column density structure of the interface between molecular clouds and H ii regions was characterized using column density maps obtained from far-infrared imaging of the Herschel HOBYS key programme. Then, the DisPerSe algorithm was used on these maps to detect the compressed layers around the ionized gas and pillars in different evolutionary states. Finally, their velocity structure was investigated using CO data, and all observational signatures were tested against some distinct diagnostics established from simulations. The column density profiles have revealed the importance of compression at the edge of the ionized gas. The velocity properties of the structures, i.e. pillars and globules, are very close to what we predict from the numerical simulations. We have identified a good candidate of a nascent pillar in the Rosette molecular cloud that presents the velocity pattern of the shell collapsing on itself, induced by a high local curvature. Globules have a bulk velocity dispersion that indicates the importance of the initial turbulence in their formation, as proposed from numerical simulations. Altogether, this study re-enforces the picture of pillar formation by shell collapse and globule formation by the ionization of highly turbulent clouds.
  • In order to characterise the cloud structures responsible for the formation of high-mass stars, we present Herschel observations of the DR21 environment. Maps of the column density and dust temperature unveil the structure of the DR21 ridge and several connected filaments. The ridge has column densities larger than 1e23/cm^2 over a region of 2.3 pc^2. It shows substructured column density profiles and branching into two major filaments in the north. The masses in the studied filaments range between 130 and 1400 Msun whereas the mass in the ridge is 15000 Msun. The accretion of these filaments onto the DR21 ridge, suggested by a previous molecular line study, could provide a continuous mass inflow to the ridge. In contrast to the striations seen in e.g., the Taurus region, these filaments are gravitationally unstable and form cores and protostars. These cores formed in the filaments potentially fall into the ridge. Both inflow and collisions of cores could be important to drive the observed high-mass star formation. The evolutionary gradient of star formation running from DR21 in the south to the northern branching is traced by decreasing dust temperature. This evolution and the ridge structure can be explained by two main filamentary components of the ridge that merged first in the south.
  • We present Herschel images from the HOBYS key program of the Eagle Nebula (M16) in the far-infrared and sub-millimetre, using the PACS and SPIRE cameras at 70{\mu}m, 160{\mu}m, 250{\mu}m, 350{\mu}m, 500{\mu}m. M16, home to the Pillars of Creation, is largely under the influence of the nearby NGC6611 high-mass star cluster. The Herschel images reveal a clear dust temperature gradient running away from the centre of the cavity carved by the OB cluster. We investigate the heating effect of NGC6611 on the entire M16 star-forming complex seen by Herschel including the diffuse cloud environment and the dense filamentary structures identified in this region. In addition, we interpret the three-dimensional geometry of M16 with respect to the nebula, its surrounding environment, and the NGC6611 cavity. The dust temperature and column density maps reveal a prominent eastern filament running north-south and away from the high-mass star-forming central region and the NGC6611 cluster, as well as a northern filament which extends around and away from the cluster. The dust temperature in each of these filaments decreases with increasing distance from the NGC6611 cluster, indicating a heating penetration depth of \sim 10 pc in each direction in 3 - 6 \times 10^{22} cm-2 column density filaments. We show that in high-mass star-forming regions OB clusters impact the temperature of future star-forming sites, modifying the initial conditions for collapse and effecting the evolutionary criteria of protostars developed from spectral energy distributions. Possible scenarios for the origin of the morphology seen in this region are discussed, including a western equivalent to the eastern filament, which was destroyed by the creation of the OB cluster and its subsequent winds and radiation.
  • A growing body of evidence indicates that the formation of filaments in interstellar clouds is a key component of the star formation process. In this paper, we present new Herschel PACS and SPIRE observations of the B59 and Stem regions in the Pipe Nebula complex, revealing a rich, organized network of filaments. The asymmetric column density profiles observed for several filaments, along with the bow-like edge of B59, indicates that the Pipe Nebula is being compressed from its western side, most likely by the winds from the nearby Sco OB2 association. We suggest that this compressive flow has contributed to the formation of some of the observed filamentary structures. In B59, the only region of the entire Pipe complex showing star formation activity, the same compressive flow has likely enhanced the initial column density of the clump, allowing it to become globally gravitationally unstable. Although more speculative, we propose that gravity has also been responsible for shaping the converging filamentary pattern observed in B59. While the question of the relative impact of large-scale compression and gravity remains open in B59, large-scale compression appears to be a plausible mechanism for the initial formation of filamentary structures in the rest of the complex
  • We provide a first look at the results of the Herschel Gould Belt survey toward the IC5146 molecular cloud and present a preliminary analysis of the filamentary structure in this region. The column density map, derived from our 70-500 micron Herschel data, reveals a complex network of filaments, and confirms that these filaments are the main birth sites of prestellar cores. We analyze the column density profiles of 27 filaments and show that the underlying radial density profiles fall off as r^{-1.5} to r^{-2.5} at large radii. Our main result is that the filaments seem to be characterized by a narrow distribution of widths having a median value of 0.10 +- 0.03 pc, which is in stark contrast to a much broader distribution of central Jeans lengths. This characteristic width of ~0.1 pc corresponds to within a factor of ~2 to the sonic scale below which interstellar turbulence becomes subsonic in diffuse gas, supporting the argument that the filaments may form as a result of the dissipation of large-scale turbulence.
  • The correlation between the large-scale distribution of galaxies and their spectroscopic properties at z=1.5 is investigated using the Horizon MareNostrum cosmological run. We have extracted a large sample of 10^5 galaxies from this large hydrodynamical simulation featuring standard galaxy formation physics. Spectral synthesis is applied to these single stellar populations to generate spectra and colours for all galaxies. We use the skeleton as a tracer of the cosmic web and study how our galaxy catalogue depends on the distance to the skeleton. We show that galaxies closer to the skeleton tend to be redder, but that the effect is mostly due to the proximity of large haloes at the nodes of the skeleton, rather than the filaments themselves. This effects translate into a bimodality in the colour distribution of our sample. The origin of this bimodality is investigated and seems to follow from the ram pressure stripping of satellite galaxies within the more massive clusters of the simulation. The virtual catalogues (spectroscopical properties of the MareNostrum galaxies at various redshifts) are available online at http://www.iap.fr/users/pichon/MareNostrum/catalogues
  • Within the context of upcoming full-sky lensing surveys, the edge-preserving non- linear algorithm Aski is presented. Using the framework of Maximum A Posteriori inversion, it aims at recovering the full-sky convergence map from surveys with masks. It proceeds in two steps: CCD images of crowded galactic fields are deblurred using automated edge-preserving deconvolution; once the reduced shear is estimated, the convergence map is also inverted via an edge- preserving method. For the deblurring, it is found that when the observed field is crowded, this gain can be quite significant for realistic ground-based surveys when both positivity and edge-preserving penalties are imposed during the iterative deconvolution. For the convergence inversion, the quality of the reconstruction is investigated on noisy maps derived from the horizon N-body simulation, with and without Galactic cuts, and quantified using one-point statistics, power spectra, cluster counts, peak patches and the skeleton. It is found that the reconstruction is able to interpolate and extrapolate within the Galactic cuts/non-uniform noise; its sharpness-preserving penalization avoids strong biasing near the clusters of the map; it reconstructs well the shape of the PDF as traced by its skewness and kurtosis; the geometry and topology of the reconstructed map is close to the initial map as traced by the peak patch distribution and the skeleton's differential length; the two-points statistics of the recovered map is consistent with the corresponding smoothed version of the initial map; the distribution of point sources is also consistent with the corresponding smoothing, with a significant improvement when edge preserving prior is applied. The contamination of B-modes when realistic Galactic cuts are present is also investigated. Leakage mainly occurs on large scales.
  • A method to compute the full hierarchy of the critical subsets of a density field is presented. It is based on a watershed technique and uses a probability propagation scheme to improve the quality of the segmentation by circumventing the discreteness of the sampling. It can be applied within spaces of arbitrary dimensions and geometry. This recursive segmentation of space yields, for a $d$-dimensional space, a $d-1$ succession of $n$-dimensional subspaces that fully characterize the topology of the density field. The final 1D manifold of the hierarchy is the fully connected network of the primary critical lines of the field : the skeleton. It corresponds to the subset of lines linking maxima to saddle points, and provides a definition of the filaments that compose the cosmic web as a precise physical object, which makes it possible to compute any of its properties such as its length, curvature, connectivity etc... When the skeleton extraction is applied to initial conditions of cosmological N-body simulations and their present day non linear counterparts, it is shown that the time evolution of the cosmic web, as traced by the skeleton, is well accounted for by the Zel'dovich approximation. Comparing this skeleton to the initial skeleton undergoing the Zel'dovich mapping shows that two effects are competing during the formation of the cosmic web: a general dilation of the larger filaments that is captured by a simple deformation of the skeleton of the initial conditions on the one hand, and the shrinking, fusion and disappearance of the more numerous smaller filaments on the other hand. Other applications of the N dimensional skeleton and its peak patch hierarchy are discussed.
  • The local theory of the critical lines of 2D and 3D Gaussian fields that underline the cosmic structures is presented. In the context of cosmological matter distribution the subset of critical lines of the 3D density field serves to delineate the skeleton of the observed filamentary structure at large scales. A stiff approximation used to quantitatively describe the filamentary skeleton shows that the flux of the skeleton lines is related to the average Gaussian curvature of the 1D (2D) sections of the field, much in the same way as the density of the peaks. The distribution of the length of the critical lines with threshold is analyzed in detail, while the extended descriptors of the skeleton - its curvature and its singular points, are introduced and briefly described. Theoretical predictions are compared to measurements of the skeleton in realizations of Gaussian random fields in 2D and 3D. It is found that the stiff approximation predicts accurately the shape of the differential length, allows for analytical insight, and explicit closed form solutions. Finally, it provides a simple classification of the singular points of the critical lines: i) critical points; ii) bifurcation points; iii) slopping plateaux.
  • We investigate how well the 3D density field of neutral hydrogen in the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) can be reconstructed using the Lyman-alpha absorptions observed along lines of sight to quasars separated by arcmin distances in projection on the sky. We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to compare the topologies of different fields: dark matter, gas and neutral hydrogen optical depth and to investigate how well the topology of the IGM can be recovered from the Wiener interpolation method implemented by Pichon et al. (2001). The global statistical and topological properties of the recovered field are analyzed quantitatively through the power-spectrum, the probability distribution function (PDF), the Euler characteristics, its associated critical point counts and the filling factor of underdense regions. The local geometrical properties of the field are analysed using the local skeleton by defining the concept of inter-skeleton distance. At scales larger than ~1.4 <d_LOS>, where <d_LOS> is the mean separation between lines of sight, the reconstruction accurately recovers the topological features of the large scale density distribution of the gas, in particular the filamentary structures. At scales larger than the intrinsic smoothing length of the inversion procedure, the power spectrum of the recovered HI density field matches well that of the original one and the low order moments of the PDF are well recovered as well as the shape of the Euler characteristic. The integral errors on the PDF and the critical point counts are indeed small, less than 20% for <d_LOS>~2.5 arcmin. The small deviations between the reconstruction and the exact solution mainly reflect departures from the log-normal behaviour that are ascribed to highly non-linear objects in overdense regions.
  • The skeleton formalism aims at extracting and quantifying the filamentary structure of the universe is generalized to 3D density fields; a numerical method for computating a local approximation of the skeleton is presented and validated here on Gaussian random fields. This method manages to trace well the filamentary structure in 3D fields such as given by numerical simulations of the dark matter distribution on large scales and is insensitive to monotonic biasing. Two of its characteristics, namely its length and differential length, are analyzed for Gaussian random fields. Its differential length per unit normalized density contrast scales like the PDF of the underlying density contrast times the total length times a quadratic Edgeworth correction involving the square of the spectral parameter. The total length scales like the inverse square smoothing length, with a scaling factor given by 0.21 (5.28+ n) where n is the power index of the underlying field. This dependency implies that the total length can be used to constrain the shape of the underlying power spectrum, hence the cosmology. Possible applications of the skeleton to galaxy formation and cosmology are discussed. As an illustration, the orientation of the spin of dark halos and the orientation of the flow near the skeleton is computed for dark matter simulations. The flow is laminar along the filaments, while spins of dark halos within 500 kpc of the skeleton are preferentially orthogonal to the direction of the flow at a level of 25%.
  • This paper presents MoLUSC, a new method for generating mock galaxy catalogs from a large scale ($\approx 1000^3$ Mpc$^3$) dark matter simulation, that requires only modest CPU time and memory allocation. The method uses a small-scale ($\approx 256^3$ Mpc$^3$) dark matter simulation on which the \galics semi-analytic code has been run in order to define the transformation from dark matter density to galaxy density transformation using a probabilistic treatment. MoLUSC is then applied to a large-scale dark matter simulation in order to produce a realistic distribution of galaxies and their associated spectra. This permits the fast generation of large-scale mock surveys using relatively low-resolution simulations. We describe various tests which have been conducted to validate the method, and demonstrate a first application to generate a mock Sloan Digital Sky Survey redshift survey.