• Condensed matter systems have now become a fertile ground to discover emerging topological quasi-particles with symmetry protected modes. While many studies have focused on Fermionic excitations, the same conceptual framework can also be applied to bosons yielding new types of topological states. Motivated by the recent theoretical prediction of double-Weyl phonons in transition metal monosilicides [Phys. Rev. Lett. 120, 016401 (2018)], we directly measured the phonon dispersion in parity-breaking FeSi using inelastic x-ray scattering. By comparing the experimental data with theoretical calculations, we make the first observation of double-Weyl points in FeSi, which will be an ideal material to explore emerging Bosonic excitations and its topologically non-trivial properties.
  • We report a polarized Raman scattering study of non-symmorphic topological insulator KHgSb with hourglass-like electronic dispersion. Supported by theoretical calculations, we show that the lattice of the previously assigned space group $P6_3/mmc$ (No. 194) is unstable in KHgSb. While we observe one of two calculated Raman active E$_{2g}$ phonons of space group $P6_3/mmc$ at room temperature, an additional A$_{1g}$ peak appears at 99.5 ~cm$^{-1}$ upon cooling below $T^*$ = 150 K, which suggests a lattice distortion. Several weak peaks associated with two-phonon excitations emerge with this lattice instability. We also show that the sample is very sensitive to high temperature and high laser power, conditions under which it quickly decomposes, leading to the formation of Sb. Our first-principles calculations indicate that space group $P6_3mc$ (No. 186), corresponding to a vertical displacement of the Sb atoms with respect to the Hg atoms that breaks the inversion symmetry, is lower in energy than the presumed $P6_3/mmc$ structure and preserves the glide plane symmetry necessary to the formation of hourglass fermions.
  • We performed a Raman scattering study of Na$_2$Ti$_2$As$_2$O. We identified a symmetry breaking structural transition at around $T_s = 150$ K, which matches a large bump in the electrical resistivity. Several new peaks are detected below that transition. Combined with first-principles calculations, our polarization-dependent measurements suggest a charge instability driven lattice distortion along one of the Ti-O bonds that breaks the 4-fold symmetry and more than doubles the unit cell.
  • We report on the selective creation of spin filltering regions in non-magnetic InGaAs layers by implantation of Ga ions by Focused Ion Beam. We demonstrate by photoluminescence spectroscopy that spin dependent recombination (SDR) ratios as high as 240% can be achieved in the implanted areas. The optimum implantation conditions for the most efficient SDR is determined by the systematic analysis of different ion doses spanning four orders of magnitude. The application of a weak external magnetic field leads to a sizeable enhancement of the SDR ratio from the spin polarization of the nuclei surrounding the polarized implanted paramagnetic defects.