• In our series of papers presenting the Herschel imaging of evolved planetary nebulae, we present images of the dust distribution in the Helix nebula (NGC 7293). Images at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron were obtained with the PACS and SPIRE instruments on board the Herschel satellite. The broadband maps show the dust distribution over the main Helix nebula to be clumpy and predominantly present in the barrel wall. We determined the spectral energy distribution of the main nebula in a consistent way using Herschel, IRAS, and Planck flux values. The emissivity index of 0.99 +/- 0.09, in combination with the carbon rich molecular chemistry of the nebula, indicates that the dust consists mainly of amorphous carbon. The dust excess emission from the central star disk is detected at 70 micron and the flux measurement agree with previous measurement. We present the temperature and dust column density maps. The total dust mass across the Helix nebula (without its halo) is determined to be 0.0035 solar mass at a distance of 216 pc. The temperature map shows dust temperatures between 22 and 42 K, which is similar to the kinetic temperature of the molecular gas, strengthening the fact that the dust and gas co-exist in high density clumps. Archived images are used to compare the location of the dust emission in the far infrared (Herschel) with the ionized (GALEX, Hbeta) and molecular hydrogen component. The different emission components are consistent with the Helix consisting of a thick walled barrel-like structure inclined to the line of sight. The radiation field decreases rapidly through the barrel wall.
  • We present X-ray spectral analysis of 20 point-like X-ray sources detected in Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS) observations of 59 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. Most of these 20 detections are associated with luminous central stars within relatively young, compact nebulae. The vast majority of these point-like X-ray-emitting sources at PN cores display relatively "hard" ($\geq0.5$~keV) X-ray emission components that are unlikely to be due to photospheric emission from the hot central stars (CSPN). Instead, we demonstrate that these sources are well modeled by optically-thin thermal plasmas. From the plasma properties, we identify two classes of CSPN X-ray emission: (1) high-temperature plasmas with X-ray luminosities, $L_{\rm X}$, that appear uncorrelated with the CSPN bolometric luminosity, $L_{\rm bol}$; and (2) lower-temperature plasmas with $L_{\rm X}/L_{\rm bol}\sim10^{-7}$. We suggest these two classes correspond to the physical processes of magnetically active binary companions and self-shocking stellar winds, respectively. In many cases this conclusion is supported by corroborative multiwavelength evidence for the wind and binary properties of the PN central stars. By thus honing in on the origins of X-ray emission from PN central stars, we enhance the ability of CSPN X-ray sources to constrain models of PN shaping that invoke wind interactions and binarity.
  • We report the first detections of OH$^+$ emission in planetary nebulae (PNe). As part of an imaging and spectroscopy survey of 11 PNe in the far-IR using the PACS and SPIRE instruments aboard the Herschel Space Observatory, we performed a line survey in these PNe over the entire spectral range between 51 and 672$\mu$m to look for new detections. OH$^+$ rotational emission lines at 152.99, 290.20, 308.48, and 329.77$\mu$m were detected in the spectra of three planetary nebulae: NGC 6445, NGC 6720, and NGC 6781. Excitation temperatures and column densities derived from these lines are in the range of 27 to 47 K and 2$\times$10$^{10}$ to 4 $\times$10$^{11}$ cm$^{-2}$, respectively. In PNe, the OH+ rotational line emission appears to be produced in the photodissociation region (PDR) in these objects. The emission of OH+ is observed only in PNe with hot central stars (T$_{eff}$ > 100000 K), suggesting that high-energy photons may play a role in the OH+ formation and its line excitation in these objects, as it seems to be the case for ultraluminous galaxies.
  • The Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) is the closest planetary nebulae. Therefore, it is an ideal template for photochemical studies at small spatial scales in planetary nebulae. We aim to study the spatial distribution of the atomic and the molecular gas, and the structure of the photodissociation region along the western rims of the Helix Nebula as seen in the submillimeter range with Herschel. We use 5 SPIRE FTS pointing observations to make atomic and molecular spectral maps. We analyze the molecular gas by modeling the CO rotational lines using a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer model. For the first time, we have detected extended OH+ emission in a planetary nebula. The spectra towards the Helix Nebula also show CO emission lines (from J= 4 to 8), [NII] at 1461 GHz from ionized gas, and [CI] (2-1), which together with the OH+ lines, trace extended CO photodissociation regions along the rims. The estimated OH+ column density is (1-10)x1e12 cm-2. The CH+ (1-0) line was not detected at the sensitivity of our observations. Non-LTE models of the CO excitation were used to constrain the average gas density (n(H2)=(1-5)x1e5 cm-3) and the gas temperature (Tk= 20-40 K). The SPIRE spectral-maps suggest that CO arises from dense and shielded clumps in the western rims of the Helix Nebula whereas OH+ and [CI] lines trace the diffuse gas and the UV and X-ray illuminated clumps surface where molecules reform after CO photodissociation. [NII] traces a more diffuse ionized gas component in the interclump medium.
  • We present 48 Herschel/PACS spectra of evolved stars in the wavelength range of 67-72 $\mu$m. This wavelength range covers the 69 $\mu$m band of crystalline olivine ($\text{Mg}_{2-2x}\text{Fe}_{(2x)}\text{SiO}_{4}$). The width and wavelength position of this band are sensitive to the temperature and composition of the crystalline olivine. Our sample covers a wide range of objects: from high mass-loss rate AGB stars (OH/IR stars, $\dot M \ge 10^{-5}$ M$_\odot$/yr), through post-AGB stars with and without circumbinary disks, to planetary nebulae and even a few massive evolved stars. The goal of this study is to exploit the spectral properties of the 69 $\mu$m band to determine the composition and temperature of the crystalline olivine. Since the objects cover a range of evolutionary phases, we study the physical and chemical properties in this range of physical environments. We fit the 69 $\mu$m band and use its width and position to probe the composition and temperature of the crystalline olivine. For 27 sources in the sample, we detected the 69 $\mu$m band of crystalline olivine ($\text{Mg}_{(2-2x)}\text{Fe}_{(2x)}\text{SiO}_{4}$). The 69 $\mu$m band shows that all the sources produce pure forsterite grains containing no iron in their lattice structure. The temperature of the crystalline olivine as indicated by the 69 $\mu$m band, shows that on average the temperature of the crystalline olivine is highest in the group of OH/IR stars and the post-AGB stars with confirmed Keplerian disks. The temperature is lower for the other post-AGB stars and lowest for the planetary nebulae. A couple of the detected 69 $\mu$m bands are broader than those of pure magnesium-rich crystalline olivine, which we show can be due to a temperature gradient in the circumstellar environment of these stars. continued...
  • This is the first of a series of investigations into far-IR characteristics of 11 planetary nebulae (PNs) under the Herschel Space Observatory Open Time 1 program, Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey (HerPlaNS). Using the HerPlaNS data set, we look into the PN energetics and variations of the physical conditions within the target nebulae. In the present work, we provide an overview of the survey, data acquisition and processing, and resulting data products. We perform (1) PACS/SPIRE broadband imaging to determine the spatial distribution of the cold dust component in the target PNs and (2) PACS/SPIRE spectral-energy-distribution (SED) and line spectroscopy to determine the spatial distribution of the gas component in the target PNs. For the case of NGC 6781, the broadband maps confirm the nearly pole-on barrel structure of the amorphous carbon-richdust shell and the surrounding halo having temperatures of 26-40 K. The PACS/SPIRE multi-position spectra show spatial variations of far-IR lines that reflect the physical stratification of the nebula. We demonstrate that spatially-resolved far-IR line diagnostics yield the (T_e, n_e) profiles, from which distributions of ionized, atomic, and molecular gases can be determined. Direct comparison of the dust and gas column mass maps constrained by the HerPlaNS data allows to construct an empirical gas-to-dust mass ratio map, which shows a range of ratios with the median of 195+-110. The present analysis yields estimates of the total mass of the shell to be 0.86 M_sun, consisting of 0.54 M_sun of ionized gas, 0.12 M_sun of atomic gas, 0.2 M_sun of molecular gas, and 4 x 10^-3 M_sun of dust grains. These estimates also suggest that the central star of about 1.5 M_sun initial mass is terminating its PN evolution onto the white dwarf cooling track.
  • As part of the Herschel Guaranteed Time Key Project MESS (Mass loss of Evolved StarS) we have imaged a sample of planetary nebulae. In this paper we present the PACS and SPIRE images of the classical bipolar planetary nebula NGC 650. We used these images to derive a temperature map of the dust. We also constructed a photoionization and dust radiative transfer model using the spectral synthesis code Cloudy. To constrain this model, we used the PACS and SPIRE fluxes and combined these with hitherto unpublished IUE and Spitzer IRS spectra as well as various other data from the literature. The temperature map combined with the photoionization model were used to study various aspects of the central star, the nebula, and in particular the dust grains in the nebula. The central star parameters are determined to be T_eff = 208 kK and L = 261 L_sol assuming a distance of 1200 pc. The stellar temperature is much higher than previously published values. We confirm that the nebula is carbon-rich with a C/O ratio of 2.1. The nebular abundances are typical for a type IIa planetary nebula. With the photoionization model we determined that the grains in the ionized nebula are large (assuming single-sized grains, they would have a radius of 0.15 micron. Most likely these large grains were inherited from the asymptotic giant branch phase. The PACS 70/160 micron temperature map shows evidence for two radiation components heating the grains. The first component is direct emission from the central star, while the second component is diffuse emission from the ionized gas (mainly Ly alpha). We show that previous suggestions that there is a photo-dissociation region surrounding the ionized region are incorrect. The neutral material resides in dense clumps inside the ionized region. These may also harbor stochastically heated very small grains in addition to the large grains.
  • CW Leo has been observed six times between October 2009 and June 2012 with the SPIRE instrument on board the Herschel satellite. Variability has been detected in the flux emitted by the central star with a period of 639 \pm 4 days, in good agreement with determinations in the literature. Variability is also detected in the bow shock around CW Leo that had previously been detected in the ultraviolet and Herschel PACS/SPIRE data. Although difficult to prove directly, our working hypothesis is that this variability is directly related to that of the central star. In this case, fitting a sine curve with the period fixed to 639 days results in a time-lag in the variability between bow shock and the central star of 402 \pm 37 days. The orientation of the bow shock relative to the plane of the sky is unknown (but see below). For an inclination angle of zero degrees, the observed time-lag translates into a distance to CW Leo of 130 \pm 13 pc, and for non-zero inclination angles the distance is smaller. Fitting the shape of the bow shock with an analytical model (Wilkin 1996), the effect of the inclination angle on the distance may be estimated. Making the additional assumption that the relative peculiar velocity between the interstellar medium (ISM) and CW Leo is determined entirely by the star space velocity with respect to the local standard of rest (i.e. a stationary ISM), the inclination angle is found to be (-33.3 \pm 0.8) degrees based on the observed proper motion and radial velocity. Using the Wilkin model, our current best estimate of the distance to CW Leo is 123 \pm 14 pc. For a distance of 123 pc, we derive a mean luminosity of 7790 \pm 150 Lsol (internal error).
  • Far-infrared Herschel/PACS images at 70 and 160 micron of a sample of 78 Galactic evolved stars are used to study the (dust) emission structures, originating from stellar wind-ISM interaction. In addition, two-fluid hydrodynamical simulations of the coupled gas and dust in wind-ISM interactions are used to compare with the observations. Four distinct classes of wind-ISM interaction (i.e. "fermata", "eyes", "irregular", and "rings") are identified and basic parameters affecting the morphology are discussed. We detect bow shocks for ~40% of the sample and detached rings for ~20%. De-projected stand-off distances (R_0) -- defined as the distance between the central star and the nearest point of the interaction region -- of the detected bow shocks ("fermata" and "eyes") are derived from the PACS images and compared to previous results, model predictions and the simulations. All observed bow shocks have stand-off distances smaller than 1 pc. Observed and theoretical stand-off distances are used together to independently derive the local ISM density. Both theoretical (analytical) models and hydrodynamical simulations give stand-off distances for adopted stellar properties that are in good agreement with the measured de-projected stand-off distance of wind-ISM bow shocks. The possible detection of a bow shock -- for the distance limited sample -- appears to be governed by its physical size as set roughly by the stand-off distance. In particular the star's peculiar space velocity and the density of the ISM appear decisive in detecting emission from bow shocks or detached rings. Tentatively, the "eyes" class objects are associated to (visual) binaries, while the "rings" generally appear not to occur for M-type stars, only for C or S-type objects that have experienced a thermal pulse.
  • In this paper we give a progress report on the Herschel imaging and spectroscopic observations of planetary nebulae that are carried out as part of the MESS guaranteed time key program. We present and discuss imaging and temperature maps of NGC 6720, NGC 650, and NGC 6853, as well as PACS and SPIRE spectroscopy of NGC 7027.
  • We present Herschel PACS and SPIRE images of the dust shells around the planetary nebulae NGC 650, NGC 6853, and NGC 6720, as well as images showing the dust temperature in their shells. The latter shows a rich structure, which indicates that internal extinction in the UV is important despite the highly evolved status of the nebulae.
  • The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars X Her and TX Psc have been imaged at 70 and 160 microns with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel satellite, as part of the large MESS (Mass loss of Evolved StarS) Guaranteed Time Key Program. The images reveal an axisymmetric extended structure with its axis oriented along the space motion of the stars. This extended structure is very likely to be shaped by the interaction of the wind ejected by the AGB star with the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). As predicted by numerical simulations, the detailed structure of the wind-ISM interface depends upon the relative velocity between star+wind and the ISM, which is large for these two stars (108 and 55 km/s for X Her and TX Psc, respectively). In both cases, there is a compact blob upstream whose origin is not fully elucidated, but that could be the signature of some instability in the wind-ISM shock. Deconvolved images of X Her and TX Psc reveal several discrete structures along the outermost filaments, which could be Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices. Finally, TX Psc is surrounded by an almost circular ring (the signature of the termination shock?) that contrasts with the outer, more structured filaments. A similar inner circular structure seems to be present in X Her as well, albeit less clearly.
  • The detected variety in chemistry and circumstellar shell morphology of the limited sample of Galactic post-AGB stars is so large that there is no consensus yet on how the different objects are linked by evolutionary channels. The evaluation is complicated by the fact that their distances and hence luminosities remain largely unknown. Via cross-correlation of the Spitzer SAGE catalogue with optical catalogues we selected a sample of LMC post-AGB candidates based on their [8]-[24] colour index and estimated luminosity. We determined the fundamental properties of the central stars of 105 of these objects using low-resolution, optical spectra that we obtained at Siding Spring Observatory and SAAO, and constructed a catalogue of 70 high probability and 1337 candidate post-AGB stars that is available at the CDS. The sample forms an ideal testbed for stellar evolution theory predictions of the final phase of low- and intermediate-mass stars, because the distance and hence luminosity and also the current and initial mass of these objects is well constrained. About half of the objects in our sample of post-AGB candidates show a spectral energy distribution (SED) that is indicative of a disc rather than an expanding and cooling AGB remnant. Like in the Galaxy, the disc sources are likely associated with binary evolution. Important side products of this research are catalogues of candidate young stellar objects, candidate supergiants with circumstellar dust, and discarded objects for which a spectrum was obtained. These too are available at the CDS.
  • MESS (Mass-loss of Evolved StarS) is a Guaranteed Time Key Program that uses the PACS and SPIRE instruments on board the Herschel Space Observatory to observe a representative sample of evolved stars, that include asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae and red supergiants, as well as luminous blue variables, Wolf-Rayet stars and supernova remnants. In total, of order 150 objects are observed in imaging and about 50 objects in spectroscopy. This paper describes the target selection and target list, and the observing strategy. Key science projects are described, and illustrated using results obtained during Herschel's science demonstration phase. Aperture photometry is given for the 70 AGB and post-AGB stars observed up to October 17, 2010, which constitutes the largest single uniform database of far-IR and sub-mm fluxes for late-type stars.
  • In this article we present the detection of the 69 {\mu}m band of the crystalline olivine forsterite within the MESS key program of Herschel. We determine the temperature of the forsterite grains by fitting the 69 {\mu}m band.
  • In this paper we will discuss the images of Planetary Nebulae that have recently been obtained with PACS and SPIRE on board the Herschel satellite. This comprises results for NGC 650 (the little Dumbbell nebula), NGC 6853 (the Dumbbell nebula), and NGC 7293 (the Helix nebula).
  • We present far-infrared and submillimetre spectra of three carbon-rich evolved objects, AFGL 2688, AFGL 618 and NGC 7027. The spectra were obtained with the SPIRE Fourier transform spectrometer on board the Herschel Space Observatory, and cover wavelengths from 195-670 um, a region of the electromagnetic spectrum hitherto difficult to study in detail. The far infrared spectra of these objects are rich and complex, and we measure over 150 lines in each object. Lines due to 18 different species are detected. We determine physical conditions from observations of the rotational lines of several molecules, and present initial large velocity gradient models for AFGL 618. We detect water in AFGL 2688 for the first time, and confirm its presence in AFGL 618 in both ortho and para forms. In addition, we report the detection of the J=1-0 line of CH+ in NGC 7027.
  • Herschel PACS and SPIRE images have been obtained over a 30'x30' area around the well-known carbon star CW Leo (IRC +10 216). An extended structure is found in an incomplete arc of ~22' diameter, which is cospatial with the termination shock due to interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) as defined by Sahai & Chronopoulos from ultraviolet GALEX images. Fluxes are derived in the 70, 160, 250, 350, and 550 um bands in the region where the interaction with the ISM takes place, and this can be fitted with a modified black body with a temperature of 25+-3 K. Using the published proper motion and radial velocity for the star, we derive a heliocentric space motion of 25.1 km/s. Using the PACS and SPIRE data and the analytical formula of the bow shock structure, we infer a de-projected standoff distance of the bow shock of R0 = (8.0+-0.3)x10^17 cm. We also derive a relative velocity of the star with respect to the ISM of (106.6+-8.7)/sqrt(n_ISM) km/s, where n_ISM is the number density of the local ISM.
  • Herschel PACS and SPIRE images have been obtained of NGC 6720 (the Ring Nebula). This is an evolved planetary nebula with a central star that is currently on the cooling track, due to which the outer parts of the nebula are recombining. From the PACS and SPIRE images we conclude that there is a striking resemblance between the dust distribution and the H2 emission, which appears to be observational evidence that H2 forms on grain surfaces. We have developed a photoionization model of the nebula with the Cloudy code which we used to determine the physical conditions of the dust and investigate possible formation scenarios for the H2. We conclude that the most plausible scenario is that the H2 resides in high density knots which were formed after the recombination of the gas started when the central star entered the cooling track. Hydrodynamical instabilities due to the unusually low temperature of the recombining gas are proposed as a mechanism for forming the knots. H2 formation in the knots is expected to be substantial after the central star underwent a strong drop in luminosity about one to two thousand years ago, and may still be ongoing at this moment, depending on the density of the knots and the properties of the grains in the knots.
  • We investigate the dust size and dust shell structure of the bipolar proto-planetary nebula M 1--92 by means of radiative transfer modeling. Our models consists of a disk and bipolar lobes that are surrounded by an AGB shell, each component having different dust characteristics. The upper limit of the grain size $a_\mathrm{max}$ in the lobes is estimated to be $0.5 \mu$m from the polarization value in the bipolar lobe. The $a_\mathrm{max}$ value of the disk is constrained with the disk mass (0.2 $M_{\sun}$), which was estimated from a previous CO emission line observation. We find a good model with $a_\mathrm{max}=1000.0 \mu$m, which provides an approximated disk mass of 0.15 $M_{\sun}$. Even taking into account uncertainties such as the gas-to-dust mass ratio, a significantly larger dust of $a_\mathrm{max}>100.0 \mu$m, comparing to the dust in the lobe, is expected. We also estimated the disk inner radius, the disk outer radius, and the envelope mass to be 30 $R_\star$(=9 AU), 4500 AU, and 4 $M_{\sun}$, respectively, where $v_\mathrm{exp}$ is the expansion velocity. If the dust existing in the lobes in large separations from the central star undergoes little dust processing, the dust sizes preserves the ones in the dust formation. Submicron-sized grains are found in many objects besides M 1--92, suggesting that the size does not depend much on the object properties, such as initial mass of the central star and chemical composition of the stellar system. On the other hand, the grain sizes in the disk do. Evidence of large grains has been reported in many bipolar PPNs, including M 1--92. This result suggests that disks play an important role in grain growth.
  • The circumstellar dust shells of intermediate initial-mass (about 1 to 8 solar masses) evolved stars are generated by copious mass loss during the asymptotic giant branch phase. The density structure of their circumstellar shell is the direct evidence of mass loss processes, from which we can investigate the nature of mass loss. We used the AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope to obtain the surface brightness maps of an evolved star R Cas at far-infrared wavelengths, since the temperature of dust decreases as the distance from the star increases and one needs to probe dust at lower temperatures, i.e., at longer wavelengths. The observed shell structure and the star's known proper motion suggest that the structure represents the interface regions between the dusty wind and the interstellar medium. The deconvolved structures are fitted with the analytic bow shock structure to determine the inclination angle of the bow shock cone. Our data show that (1) the bow shock cone of 1 - 5 x 10^-5 solar masses (dust mass) is inclined at 68 degrees with respect to the plane of the sky, and (2) the dust temperature in the bow shock cone is raised to more than 20 K by collisional shock interaction in addition to the ambient interstellar radiation field. By comparison between the apex vector of the bow shock and space motion vector of the star we infer that there is a flow of interstellar medium local to R Cas whose flow velocity is at least 55.6 km/s, consistent with an environment conducive to dust heating by shock interactions.
  • We report the observations of 12 globular clusters with the AKARI/FIS. Our goal is to search for emission from the cold dust within clusters. We detect diffuse emissions toward NGC 6402 and 2808, but the IRAS 100-micron maps show the presence of strong background radiation. They are likely emitted from the galactic cirrus, while we cannot rule out the possible association of a bump of emission with the cluster in the case of NGC 6402. We also detect 28 point-like sources mainly in the WIDE-S images (90 micron). At least several of them are not associated with the clusters but background galaxies based on some external catalogs. We present the SEDs by combining the near-and-mid infrared data obtained with the IRC if possible. The SEDs suggest that most of the point sources are background galaxies. We find one candidate of the intracluster dust which has no mid-infrared counterpart unlike the other point-like sources, although some features such as its point-like appearance should be explained before we conclude its intracluster origin. For most of the other clusters, we have confirmed the lack of the intracluster dust. We evaluate upper limits of the intracluster dust mass to be between 1.0E-05 and 1.0E-03 solar mass depending on the dust temperature. The lifetime of the intracluster dust inferred from the upper limits is shorter than 5 Myr (T=70K) or 50 Myr (35K). Such short lifetime indicates some mechanism(s) are at work to remove the intracluster dust. We also discuss its impact on the chemical evolution of globular clusters.
  • The results from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) snapshot survey of post-AGB objects are shown. The aim of the survey is to complement existing HST images of PPN and to connect various types of nebulosities with physical and chemical properties of their central stars. Nebulosities are detected in 15 of 33 sources. Images and photometric and geometric measurements are presented. For sources with nebulosities we see a morphological bifurcation into two groups, DUPLEX and SOLE, as previous studies have found. We find further support to the previous results suggesting that this dichotomy is caused by a difference in optical thickness of the dust shell. The remaining 18 sources are classified as stellar post-AGB objects, because our observations indicate a lack of nebulosity. We show that some stellar sources may in fact be DUPLEX or SOLE based on their infrared colors. The cause of the differences among the groups are investigated. We discuss some evidence suggesting that high progenitor-mass AGB stars tend to become DUPLEX post-AGB objects. Intermediate progenitor-mass AGB stars tend to be SOLE post-AGB objects. Most of the stellar sources probably have low mass progenitors and do not seem to develop nebulosities during the post-AGB phase and therefore do not become planetary nebulae.
  • context: The spectrum of IRAS 16594-4656 shows shock excited H_2 emission and collisionally excited emission lines such as[O I],[C I],and [Fe II]. aim: The goal is to determine the location of the H_2 and [Fe II] shock emission, to determine the shock velocities,and constrain the physical properties in the shock. methods: High resolution spectra of the H_2 1-0 S(1),H_2 2-1 S(1), [Fe II], and Pa$\beta$ emission lines were obtained with the near infrared spectrograph Phoenix on Gemini South. results: The position-velocity diagrams of H_2 1-0 S(1), H_2 2-1 S(1), and [Fe II] are presented. The H_2 and [Fe II] emission is spatially extended. The collisionally excited [O I] and [C I] optical emission lines have a similar double peaked profile compared to the extracted H_2 profile and appear to be produced in the same shock. They all indicate an expansion velocity of ~8 km/s and the presence of a neutral, very high density region with $n_{\rm e}$ about 3 x 10^6 to 5 x10^7 cm$^{-3}$. The [Fe II] emission however is single peaked. It has a gaussian FWHM of 30 km/s and a total width of 62 km/s at 1% of the peak. The Pa$\beta$ profile is even wider with a gaussian FWHM of 48 km/s and a total width of 75 km/s at 1% of the peak. conclusions: The H$_2$ emission is excited in a slow 5 to 20 km/s shock into dense material at the edge of the lobes, caused by the interaction of the AGB ejecta and the post-AGB wind. The 3D representation of the H_2 data shows a hollow structure with less H_2 emission in the equatorial region. The [Fe II] emission is not present in the lobes, but originates close to the central star in fast shocks in the post-AGB wind or in a disk. The Pa$\beta$ emission also appears to originate close to the star.
  • Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented for the Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). IRAC and MIPS 24 um epoch one data are presented. These data represent the deepest, widest mid-infrared CMDs of their kind ever produced in the LMC. Combined with the 2MASS survey, the diagrams are used to delineate the evolved stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud as well as Galactic foreground and extragalactic background populations. Some 32000 evolved stars brighter than the tip of the red giant branch are identified. Of these, approximately 17500 are classified as oxygen-rich, 7000 carbon-rich, and another 1200 as ``extreme'' asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Brighter members of the latter group have been called ``obscured'' AGB stars in the literature owing to their dusty circumstellar envelopes. A large number (1200) of luminous oxygen--rich AGB stars/M supergiants are also identified. Finally, there is strong evidence from the 24 um MIPS channel that previously unexplored, lower luminosity oxygen-rich AGB stars contribute significantly to the mass loss budget of the LMC (1200 such sources are identified).