• The success of black phosphorus in fast electronic and photonic devices is hindered by its rapid degradation in presence of oxygen. Orthorhombic tin selenide is a representative of group IV-VI binary compounds that are robust, isoelectronic, and share the same structure with black phosphorus. We measured the band structure of SnSe and found highly anisotropic valence bands that form several valleys having fast dispersion within the layers and negligible dispersion across. This is exactly the band structure desired for efficient thermoelectric generation where SnSe has shown a great promise.
  • High-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is used to examine the electronic band structure of FeTe$_{0.5}$Se$_{0.5}$ near the Brillouin zone center. A consistent separation of the $\alpha_{1}$ and $\alpha_{2}$ bands is observed with little $k_{z}$ dependence of the $\alpha_{1}$ band. First-principles calculations for bulk and thin films demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic coupling between the Fe atoms and hybridization-induced spin-orbit effects lifts the degeneracy of the Fe $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals at the zone center leading to orbital ordering. These experimental and computational results provide a natural microscopic basis for the nematicity observed in the Fe-based superconductors.
  • We used low-energy, momentum-resolved inelastic electron scattering to study surface collective modes of the three-dimensional topological insulators Bi$_2$Se$_3$ and Bi$_{0.5}$Sb$_{1.5}$Te$_{3-x}$Se$_{x}$. Our goal was to identify the "spin plasmon" predicted by Raghu and co-workers [S. Raghu, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 116401 (2010)]. Instead, we found that the primary collective mode is a surface plasmon arising from the bulk, free carrers in these materials. This excitation dominates the spectral weight in the bosonic function of the surface, $\chi "(\textbf{q},\omega)$, at THz energy scales, and is the most likely origin of a quasiparticle dispersion kink observed in previous photoemission experiments. Our study suggests that the spin plasmon may mix with this other surface mode, calling for a more nuanced understanding of optical experiments in which the spin plasmon is reported to play a role.
  • We report a new, cleavable, strong-topological-metal, Zr2Te2P, which has the same tetradymite-type crystal structure as the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se. Instead of being a semiconductor, however, Zr2Te2P is metallic with a pseudogap between 0.2 and 0.7 eV above the fermi energy (EF). Inside this pseudogap, two Dirac dispersions are predicted: one is a surface-originated Dirac cone protected by time-reversal symmetry (TRS), while the other is a bulk-originated and slightly gapped Dirac cone with a largely linear dispersion over a 2 eV energy range. A third surface TRS-protected Dirac cone is predicted, and observed using ARPES, making Zr2Te2P the first system to realize TRS-protected Dirac cones at M points. The high anisotropy of this Dirac cone is similar to the one in the hypothetical Dirac semimetal BiO2. We propose that if EF can be tuned into the pseudogap where the Dirac dispersions exist, it may be possible to observe ultrahigh carrier mobility and large magnetoresistance in this material.
  • A long-standing issue in topological insulator research has been to find a material that provides an ideal platform for characterizing topological surface states without interference from bulk electronic states and can reliably be fabricated as bulk crystals. This material would be a bulk insulator, have a surface state Dirac point energy well isolated from the bulk valence and conduction bands, have high surface state electronic mobility, and be growable as large, high quality bulk single crystals. Here we show that this major materials obstacle in the field is overcome by crystals of lightly Sn-doped Bi1.1Sb0.9Te2S (Sn-BSTS) grown by the Vertical Bridgeman method, which we characterize here via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, transport studies of the bulk and surface states, and X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. We present this new material as a bulk topological insulator that can be reliably grown and studied in many laboratories around the world.
  • A three-dimensional strong-topological-insulator or -semimetal hosts topological surface states which are often said to be gapless so long as time-reversal symmetry is preserved. This narrative can be mistaken when surface state degeneracies occur away from time-reversal-invariant momenta. The mirror-invariance of the system then becomes essential in protecting the existence of a surface Fermi surface. Here we show that such a case exists in the strong-topological-semimetal Bi$_4$Se$_3$. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and \textit{ab initio} calculations reveal partial gapping of surface bands on the Bi$_2$Se$_3$-termination of Bi$_4$Se$_3$(111), where an 85 meV gap along $\bar{\Gamma}\bar{K}$ closes to zero toward the mirror-invariant $\bar{\Gamma}\bar{M}$ azimuth. The gap opening is attributed to an interband spin-orbit interaction that mixes states of opposite spin-helicity.
  • The chiral magnetic effect is the generation of electric current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum anomaly in relativistic field theory of chiral fermions (massless spin $1/2$ particles with a definite projection of spin on momentum) -- a dramatic phenomenon arising from a collective motion of particles and antiparticles in the Dirac sea. The recent discovery of Dirac semimetals with chiral quasi-particles opens a fascinating possibility to study this phenomenon in condensed matter experiments. Here we report on the first observation of chiral magnetic effect through the measurement of magneto-transport in zirconium pentatelluride, ZrTe_5. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments show that this material's electronic structure is consistent with a 3D Dirac semimetal. We observe a large negative magnetoresistance when magnetic field is parallel with the current. The measured quadratic field dependence of the magnetoconductance is a clear indication of the chiral magnetic effect. The observed phenomenon stems from the effective transmutation of Dirac semimetal into a Weyl semimetal induced by the parallel electric and magnetic fields that represent a topologically nontrivial gauge field background.
  • To achieve and utilize the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TI),it is necessary to open a "Dirac-mass gap" in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely used approach. But it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in the ferromagnetic TI Cr$_{0.08}$(Bi$_{0.1}$Sb$_{0.9}$)$_{1.92}$Te$_3$. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap $\Delta(r)$ reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate directly is related to fluctuations in $n(r)$, the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of $\Delta(r)$ consistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship $\Delta(r)\propto n(r)$ is confirmed throughout, and exhibits an electron-dopant interaction energy $J^*$=145$meV\cdot nm^2$. These observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal-symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential.
  • We show that a small number of intentionally introduced defects can be used as a spectroscopic tool to amplify quasiparticle interference in 2H-NbSe$_{2}$, that we measure by scanning tunneling spectroscopic imaging. We show from the momentum and energy dependence of the quasiparticle interference that Fermi surface nesting is inconsequential to charge density wave formation in 2H-NbSe$_{2}$. We demonstrate that by combining quasiparticle interference data with additional knowledge of the quasiparticle band structure from angle resolved photoemission measurements, one can extract the wavevector and energy dependence of the important electronic scattering processes thereby obtaining direct information both about the fermiology and the interactions. In 2H-NbSe$_{2}$, we use this combination to show that the important near-Fermi-surface electronic physics is dominated by the coupling of the quasiparticles to soft mode phonons at a wave vector different from the CDW ordering wave vector.
  • The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe$_2$ was identified.
  • Proximity-induced superconductivity in a 3D topological insulator represents a new avenue for observing zero-energy Majorana fermions inside vortex cores. Relatively small gaps and low transition temperatures of conventional s-wave superconductors put the hard constraints on these experiments. Significantly larger gaps and higher transition temperatures in cuprate superconductors might be an attractive alternative to considerably relax these constraints, but it is not clear whether the proximity effect would be effective in heterostructures involving cuprates and topological insulators. Here, we present angle-resolved photoemission studies of thin Bi2Se3 films grown in-situ on optimally doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 substrates that show the absence of proximity-induced gaps on the surfaces of Bi2Se3 films as thin as a 1.5 quintuple layer. These results suggest that the superconducting proximity effect between a cuprate superconductor and a topological insulator is strongly suppressed, likely due to a very short coherence length along the c-axis, incompatible crystal and pairing symmetries at the interface, small size of the topological surface state Fermi surface and adverse effects of a strong spin-orbit coupling in the topological material.
  • A comparative study of the properties of topological insulator Bi2Te2Se (BTS) crystals grown by the vertical Bridgeman method is described. Two defect mechanisms that create acceptor impurities to compensate for the native n-type carriers are compared: Bi excess, and light Sn doping. Both methods yield low carrier concentrations and an n-p crossover over the length of the grown crystal boules, but lower carrier concentrations and higher resistivities are obtained for the Sn-doped crystals, which reach carrier concentrations as low as 8 x 1014 cm-3. Further, the temperature dependent resistivities for the Sn-doped crystals display strongly activated behavior at high temperatures, with a characteristic energy of half the bulk band gap. The (001) cleaved Sn-doped BTS crystals display high quality Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) quantum oscillations due to the topological surface state electrons. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) characterization shows that the Fermi energy (EF) for the Sn-doped crystals falls cleanly in the surface states with no interference from the bulk bands, that the Dirac point for the surface states lies approximately 60 meV below the top of the bulk valence band maximum, and allows for a determination of the bulk and surface state carrier concentrations as a function of Energy near EF. Electronic structure calculations that compare Bi excess and Sn dopants in BTS demonstrate that Sn acts as a special impurity, with a localized impurity band that acts as a charge buffer occurring inside the bulk band gap. We propose that the special resonant level character of Sn in BTS gives rise to the exceptionally low carrier concentrations and activated resistivities observed.
  • Properties of many layered materials, including copper- and iron-based superconductors, topological insulators, graphite and epitaxial graphene can be manipulated by inclusion of different atomic and molecular species between the layers via a process known as intercalation. For example, intercalation in graphite can lead to superconductivity and is crucial in the working cycle of modern batteries and supercapacitors. Intercalation involves complex diffusion processes along and across the layers, but the microscopic mechanisms and dynamics of these processes are not well understood. Here we report on a novel mechanism for intercalation and entrapment of alkali-atoms under epitaxial graphene. We find that the intercalation is adjusted by the van der Waals interaction, with the dynamics governed by defects anchored to graphene wrinkles. Our findings are relevant for the future design and application of graphene-based nano-structures. Similar mechanisms can also play a role for intercalation of layered materials.
  • The guarding game is a game in which several cops try to guard a region in a (directed or undirected) graph against Robber. Robber and the cops are placed on the vertices of the graph; they take turns in moving to adjacent vertices (or staying), cops inside the guarded region, Robber on the remaining vertices (the robber-region). The goal of Robber is to enter the guarded region at a vertex with no cop on it. The problem is to determine whether for a given graph and given number of cops the cops are able to prevent Robber from entering the guarded region. Fomin et al. [Fomin, Golovach, Hall, Mihalak, Vicari, Widmayer: How to Guard a Graph? Algorithmica 61(4), 839--856 (2011)] proved that the problem is NP-complete when the robber-region is restricted to a tree. Further they prove that is it PSPACE-complete when the robber-region is restricted to a directed acyclic graph, and they ask about the problem complexity for arbitrary graphs. In this paper we prove that the problem is E-complete for arbitrary directed graphs.
  • Topological crystalline insulators represent a novel topological phase of matter in which the surface states are protected by discrete point group-symmetries of the underlying lattice. Rock-salt lead-tin-selenide alloy is one possible realization of this phase which undergoes a topological phase transition upon changing the lead content. We used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to probe the surface states on (001) Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_{x}$Se in the topologically non-trivial (x=0.23) and topologically trivial (x=0) phases. We observed quasiparticle interference with STM on the surface of the topological crystalline insulator and demonstrated that the measured interference can be understood from ARPES studies and a simple band structure model. Furthermore, our findings support the fact that Pb$_{0.77}$Sn$_{0.23}$Se and PbSe have different topological nature.
  • Gapless surface states on topological insulators are protected from elastic scattering on non-magnetic impurities which makes them promising candidates for low-power electronic applications. However, for wide-spread applications, these states should remain coherent and significantly spin polarized at ambient temperatures. Here, we studied the coherence and spin-structure of the topological states on the surface of a model topological insulator, Bi2Se3, at elevated temperatures in spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We found an extremely weak broadening and essentially no decay of spin polarization of the topological surface state up to room temperature. Our results demonstrate that the topological states on surfaces of topological insulators could serve as a basis for room temperature electronic devices.
  • 25 years after discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) in La$_{2-x}$Ba$_x$CuO$_4$ (LBCO), the HTSC continues to pose some of the biggest challenges in materials science. Cuprates are fundamentally different from conventional superconductors in that the metallic conductivity and superconductivity are induced by doping carriers into an antiferromagnetically ordered correlated insulator. In such systems, the normal state is expected to be quite different from a Landau-Fermi liquid - the basis for the conventional BCS theory of superconductivity. The situation is additionally complicated by the fact that cuprates are susceptible to charge/spin ordering tendencies, especially in the low-doping regime. The role of such tendencies on the phenomenon of superconductivity is still not completely clear. Here, we present studies of the electronic structure in cuprates where the superconductivity is strongly suppressed as static spin and charge orders or stripes develop near the doping level of $x =1/8$ and outside of the superconducting dome, for $x<0.055$. We discuss the relationship between the stripes, superconductivity, pseudogap and the observed electronic excitations in these materials.
  • We report spin- and angle-resolved photoemission studies of a topological insulator from the infinitely adaptive series between elemental Bi and Bi$_2$Se$_3$. The compound, based on Bi$_4$Se$_3$, is a 1:1 natural superlattice of alternating Bi$_2$ layers and Bi$_2$Se$_3$ layers; the inclusion of S allows the growth of large crystals, with the formula Bi$_4$Se$_{2.6}$S$_{0.4}$. The crystals cleave along the interfaces between the Bi$_2$ and Bi$_2$Se$_3$ layers, with the surfaces obtained having alternating Bi or Se termination. The resulting terraces, observed by photoemission electron microscopy, create avenues suitable for the study of one-dimensional topological physics. The electronic structure, determined by spin- and angle- resolved photoemission spectroscopy, shows the existence of a surface state that forms a large, hexagonally shaped Fermi surface around the $\Gamma$ point of the surface Brillouin zone, with the spin structure indicating that this material is a topological insulator.
  • Gapless surface states on topological insulators are protected from elastic scattering on non-magnetic impurities which makes them promising candidates for low-power electronic applications. However, for wide-spread applications, these states should have to remain coherent at ambient temperatures. Here, we studied temperature dependence of the electronic structure and the scattering rates on the surface of a model topological insulator, Bi$_2$Se$_3$, by high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We found an extremely weak broadening of the topological surface state with temperature and no anomalies in the state's dispersion, indicating exceptionally weak electron-phonon coupling. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state is protected not only from elastic scattering on impurities, but also from scattering on low-energy phonons, suggesting that topological insulators could serve as a basis for room temperature electronic devices.
  • Heavily electron-doped surfaces of Bi$_2$Se$_3$ have been studied by spin and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Upon doping, electrons occupy a series of {\bf k}-split pairs of states above the topological surface state. The {\bf k}-splitting originates from the large spin-orbit coupling and results in a Rashba-type behavior, unequivocally demonstrated here via the spin analysis. The spin helicities of the lowest laying Rashba doublet and the adjacent topological surface state alternate in a left-right-left sequence. This spin configuration sets constraints to inter-band scattering channels opened by electron doping. A detailed analysis of the scattering rates suggests that intra-band scattering dominates with the largest effect coming from warping of the Fermi surface.
  • In their comment Calandra \textit{et al} \cite{Calandra}, assert two points: (1) the estimate of charge transfer from Li to graphene layers in LiC$_6$ in our letter \cite{Pan2011c} is incorrect because of the three dimensional (3D) character of the electronic structure in bulk LiC$_6$; (2) our main claim that the superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) is graphene-sheet-driven is therefore invalid.
  • Dirac-like surface states on surfaces of topological insulators have a chiral spin structure that suppresses back-scattering and protects the coherence of these states in the presence of non-magnetic scatterers. In contrast, magnetic scatterers should open the back- scattering channel via the spin-flip processes and degrade the state's coherence. We present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the scattering rates upon adsorption of various magnetic and non-magnetic impurities on the surface of Bi$_2$Se$_3$, a model topological insulator. We reveal a remarkable insensitivity of the topological surface state to both non-magnetic and magnetic impurities in the low impurity concentration regime. Scattering channels open up with the emergence of hexagonal warping in the high-doping regime, irrespective of the impurity's magnetic moment.
  • We performed high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the spin texture on the surface of Bi$_2$Se$_3$, a model topological insulator. By tuning the photon energy, we found that the topological surface state is well separated from the bulk states in the vicinity of $k_z=Z$ plane of the bulk Brillouin zone. The spin-resolved measurements in that region indicate a very high degree of spin polarization of the surface state, $\sim 0.75$, much higher than previously reported. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state on Bi$_2$Se$_3$ is highly spin polarized and that the dominant factors limiting the polarization are mainly extrinsic.
  • We have performed photoemission studies of the electronic structure in LiC$_6$ and KC$_8$, a non-superconducting and a superconducting graphite intercalation compound, respectively. We have found that the charge transfer from the intercalant layers to graphene layers is larger in KC$_8$ than in LiC$_6$, opposite of what might be expected from their chemical composition. We have also measured the strength of the electron-phonon interaction on the graphene-derived Fermi surface to carbon derived phonons in both materials and found that it follows a universal trend where the coupling strength and superconductivity monotonically increase with the filling of graphene $\pi^{\ast}$ states. This correlation suggests that both graphene-derived electrons and graphene-derived phonons are crucial for superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds.
  • We present a combined analysis of neutron scattering and photoemission measurements on superconducting FeSe(0.5)Te(0.5). The low-energy magnetic excitations disperse only in the direction transverse to the characteristic wave vector (1/2,0,0), whereas the electronic Fermi surface near (1/2,0,0) appears to consist of four incommensurate pockets. While the spin resonance occurs at an incommensurate wave vector compatible with nesting, neither spin-wave nor Fermi-surface-nesting models can describe the magnetic dispersion. We propose that a coupling of spin and orbital correlations is key to explaining this behavior. If correct, it follows that these nematic fluctuations are involved in the resonance and could be relevant to the pairing mechanism.