• Two red supergiants of the Per OB1 association, RS Per and T Per, have been observed in H band using the MIRC instrument at the CHARA array. The data show clear evidence of departure from circular symmetry. We present here new techniques specially developed to analyze such cases, based on state-of-the-art statistical frameworks. The stellar surfaces are first modeled as limb-darkened discs based on SATLAS models that fit both MIRC interferometric data and publicly available spectrophotometric data. Bayesian model selection is then used to determine the most probable number of spots. The effective surface temperatures are also determined and give further support to the recently derived hotter temperature scales of red su- pergiants. The stellar surfaces are reconstructed by our model-independent imaging code SQUEEZE, making use of its novel regularizer based on Compressed Sensing theory. We find excellent agreement between the model-selection results and the reconstructions. Our results provide evidence for the presence of near-infrared spots representing about 3-5% of the stellar flux.
  • Due to the strong magnetic field and related abnormal surface layers existing in rapidly oscillating Ap stars, systematic errors are likely to be present when determining their effective temperatures, which potentially compromises asteroseismic studies of these pulsators. Using long-baseline interferometry, our goal is to determine accurate angular diameters of a number of roAp targets to provide a temperature calibration for these stars. We obtained interferometric observations of 10 Aql with the visible spectrograph VEGA at the CHARA array. We determined a limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.275+/-0.009 mas and deduced a linear radius of 2.32+/-0.09 R_sun. We estimated the star's bolometric flux and used it, in combination with its parallax and angular diameter, to determine the star's luminosity and effective temperature. For two data sets of bolometric flux we derived an effective temperature of 7800+/-170 K and a luminosity of 18+/-1 L_sun or of 8000+/-210 K and 19+/-2 L_sun. We used these fundamental parameters together with the large frequency separation to constrain the mass and the age of 10 Aql, using the CESAM stellar evolution code. Assuming a solar chemical composition and ignoring all kinds of diffusion and settling of elements, we obtained a mass of 1.92 M_sun and an age of 780 Gy or a mass of 1.95 M_sun and an age of 740 Gy, depending on the considered bolometric flux. For the first time, we managed to determine an accurate angular diameter for a star smaller than 0.3 mas and to derive its fundamental parameters. In particular, by only combining our interferometric data and the bolometric flux, we derived an effective temperature that can be compared to those derived from atmosphere models. Such fundamental parameters can help for testing the mechanism responsible for the excitation of the oscillations observed in the magnetic pulsating stars.
  • We report on near-IR interferometric observations of the outburst of the recurrent nova T Pyx. We obtained near-IR observations of T Pyx at dates ranging from t=2.37d to t=48.2d after the outburst, with the CLASSIC recombiner, located at the CHARA array, and with the PIONIER and AMBER recombiners, located at the VLTI array. These data are supplemented with near-IR photometry and spectra obtained at Mount Abu, India. Slow expansion velocities were measured (<300km/s) before t=20d (assuming D=3.5kpc). From t=28d on, the AMBER and PIONIER continuum visibilities (K and H band, respectively) are best simulated with a two component model consisting of an unresolved source plus an extended source whose expansion velocity onto the sky plane is lower than 700km/s. The expansion of the Brgamma line forming region, as inferred at t=28d and t=35d is slightly larger, implying velocities in the range 500-800km/s, still strikingly lower than the velocities of 1300-1600km/s inferred from the Doppler width of the line. Moreover, a remarkable pattern was observed in the Brgamma differential phases. A semi-quantitative model using a bipolar flow with a contrast of 2 between the pole and equator velocities, an inclination of i=15^{\circ} and a position angle P.A.=110^{\circ} provides a good match to the AMBER observables (spectra, differential visibilities and phases). At t=48d, a PIONIER dataset confirms the two component nature of the H band emission, consisting of an unresolved stellar source and an extended region whose appearance is circular and symmetric within error bars.These observations are most simply interpreted within the frame of a bipolar model, oriented nearly face-on. This finding has profound implications for the interpretation of past, current and future observations of the expanding nebula.
  • The CHARA Array is a six 1-m telescope optical and near infrared interferometer located at the Mount Wilson Observatory in southern California and operated by the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy of Georgia State University. The CHARA Array has been in regular scientific operation since 2005 and now has over 55 publications in the refereed literature, including two in Science and one in Nature. The Array now supports seven beam combiners ranging from 0.5 microns up to 2.3 microns and combing from 2 to 4 beams at a time. An upgrade to a full 6 beam combiner is now underway and fringes with all six telescopes were achieved soon after the meeting.We present some of the more recent results from the CHARA-Array.
  • We have obtained H-band interferometric observations of three galactic red supergiant stars using the MIRC instrument on the CHARA array. The targets include AZ Cyg, a field RSG and two members of the Per OB1 association, RS Per and T Per. We find evidence of departures from circular symmetry in all cases, which can be modelled with the presence of hotspots. This is the first detection of these features in the $H$-band. The measured mean diameters and the spectral energy distributions were combined to determine effective temperatures. The results give further support to the recently derived hotter temperature scale of red supergiant stars by Levesque et al. (2005), which has been evoked to reconcile the empirically determined physical parameters and stellar evolutionary theories. We see a possible correlation between spottedness and mid-IR emission of the circumstellar dust, suggesting a connection between mass-loss and the mechanism that generates the spots.
  • We report on K-band interferometric observations of the bright, rapidly rotating star Regulus (type B7 V) made with the CHARA Array on Mount Wilson, California. Through a combination of interferometric and spectroscopic measurements, we have determined for Regulus the equatorial and polar diameters and temperatures, the rotational velocity and period, the inclination and position angle of the spin axis, and the gravity darkening coefficient. These first results from the CHARA Array provide the first interferometric measurement of gravity darkening in a rapidly rotating star and represent the first detection of gravity darkening in a star that is not a member of an eclipsing binary system.