• We built a 8um selected sample of galaxies in the NEP-AKARI field by defining 4 redshift bins with the four AKARI bands at 11, 15, 18 and 24 microns (0.15<z<0.49, 0.75<z<1.34, 1.34<z<1.7 and 1.7<z<2.05) . Our sample contains 4079 sources, 599 are securely detected with Herschel/PACS. Also adding ultraviolet (UV) data from GALEX, we fit the spectral energy distributions using the physically motivated code CIGALE to extract the star formation rate, stellar mass, dust attenuation and the AGN contribution to the total infrared luminosity (L_{IR}). We discuss the impact of the adopted attenuation curve and that of the wavelength coverage to estimate these physical parameters. We focus on galaxies with a luminosity close the characteristic L_{IR}^* in the different redshift bins to study the evolution with redshift of the dust attenuation in these galaxies.
  • The aim of this work is to characterize physical properties of Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) and Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) detected in the far-infrared (FIR) 90um band in the AKARI Deep Field-South (ADF-S) survey. In particular, we want to estimate the AGN contribution to the [U]LIRGs' infrared emission and which types of AGNs are related to their activity. We examined 69 galaxies at z>0.05 detected at 90um by the AKARI satellite in the ADF-S, with optical counterparts and spectral coverage from the ultraviolet to the FIR. We used two independent spectral energy distribution fitting codes: one fitting the SED from FIR to FUV (CIGALE) and gray-body + power spectrum fit for the infrared part of the spectra (CMCIRSED) in order to identify a subsample of [U]LIRGs, and to estimate their properties. Based on the CIGALE SED fitting, we have found that [U]LIRGs selected at the 90um AKARI band compose ~56% of our sample (we found 17 ULIRGs and 22 LIRGs, spanning over the redshift range 0.06<z<1.23). Their physical parameters, such as stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR are consistent with the ones found for other samples selected at IR wavelengths. We have detected a significant AGN contribution to the MIR luminosity for 63% of LIRGs and ULIRGs. Our LIRGs contain Type 1, Type 2, and intermediate types of AGN, whereas for ULIRGs, a majority (more than 50%) of AGN emission originates from Type 2 AGNs. The temperature--luminosity and temperature--mass relations for the dust component of ADF--S LIRGs and ULIRGs indicate that these relations are shaped by the dust mass and not by the increased dust heating. We conclude that LIRGs contain Type 1, Type 2, and intermediate types of AGNs, with an AGN contribution to the MIR emission at the median level of 13+/-3%, whereas the majority of ULIRGs contain Type 2 AGNs, with a median AGN fraction equal to 19+/-8%.
  • We aim to use the a new and improved version of AKARI all sky survey catalogue of far-infrared sources to recalibrate the formula to derive the total infrared luminosity. We cross-match the faint source catalogue (FSC) of IRAS with the new AKARI-FIS and obtained a sample of 2430 objects. Then we calculate the total infrared (TIR) luminosity $L_{\textrm{TIR}}$ from the Sanders at al. (1996) formula and compare it with total infrared luminosity from AKARI FIS bands to obtain new coefficients for the general relation to convert FIR luminosity from AKARI bands to the TIR luminosity.
  • The main aim of this work is the characterization of physical properties of galaxies detected in the far infrared (FIR) in the AKARI Deep Field-South (ADF-S) survey. Starting from a catalog of the 1 000 brightest ADF-S sources in the WIDE-S (90$\mu$m) AKARI band, we constructed a subsample of galaxies with spectral coverage from the ultraviolet to the far infrared. We then analyzed the multiwavelength properties of this 90$\mu$m selected sample of galaxies. For galaxies without known spectroscopic redshifts we computed photometric redshifts using the codes Photometric Analysis for Redshift Estimate (Le PHARE) and Code Investigating GALaxy Emission (CIGALE), tested these photometric redshifts using spectroscopic redshifts, and compared the performances of both codes. To test the reliability of parameters obtained by fitting spectral energy distributions, a mock cataloge was generated. We built a large multiwavelength catalog of more than 500 ADF-S galaxies. We successfully fitted Spectral Energy Distributions of 186 galaxies with $\rm{\chi^2_{min}<4}$, and analyzed the output parameters of the fits. We conclude that our sample consists mostly of nearby actively star-forming galaxies, and all our galaxies have a relatively high metallicity. We estimated photometric redshifts for 113 galaxies from the whole ADF-S sample. Comparing the performance of Le PHARE and CIGALE, we found that CIGALE gives more reliable redshift estimates for our galaxies, which implies that including the IR photometry allows for substantial improvement of photometric redshift estimation.
  • We present the results of the analysis of multiwavelength Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of far-infrared galaxies detected in the AKARI Deep Field-South (ADF--S) Survey. The analysis uses a carefully selected sample of 186 sources detected at the 90 $\mu$m AKARI band, identified as galaxies with cross-identification in public catalogues. For sources without known spectroscopic redshifts, we estimate photometric redshifts after a test of two independent methods: one based on using mainly the optical -- mid infrared range, and one based on the whole range of ultraviolet -- far infrared data. We observe a vast improvement in the estimation of photometric redshifts when far infrared data are included, compared with an approach based mainly on the optical -- mid infrared range. We discuss the physical properties of our far-infrared-selected sample. We conclude that this sample consists mostly of rich in dust and young stars nearby galaxies, and, furthermore, that almost 25% of these sources are (Ultra)Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Average SEDs normalized at 90 $\mu$m for normal galaxies (138 sources), LIRGs (30 sources), and ULIRGs (18 galaxies) a the significant shift in the peak wavelength of the dust emission, and an increasing ratio between their bolometric and dust luminosities which varies from 0.39 to 0.73.
  • The nearby universe remains the best laboratory to understand physical properties of galaxies and is a reference for any comparison with high redshift observations. The all sky (or very large) surveys performed from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared (far-IR) gives us large datasets with a very large wavelength coverage to perform a reference study. We want to investigate dust attenuation characteristics as well as star formation rate (SFR) calibrations on a sample of nearby galaxies observed over 13 bands from 0.15 to 160 microns. A sample of 363 galaxies is built from the AKARI /FIS all sky survey cross-correlated with SDSS and GALEX surveys. Broad band spectral energy distributions are fitted with the CIGALE code optimized to analyze variations in dust attenuation curves and SFR measurements and based on an energetic budget between the stellar and dust emission. Our galaxy sample is primarily selected in far-IR and mostly constituted of massive, actively star forming galaxies. There is some evidence for a dust attenuation law slightly steeper than that used for starburst galaxies but we are unable to constrain the presence or not of a bump at 220 nm. We confirm that a time dependent dust attenuation is necessary to perform the best fits. Various calibrations of the dust attenuation in the UV as a function of UV-optical colours are discussed. A calibration of the current star formation rate combining UV and total IR emissions is proposed with an accurate estimation of dust heating by old stars: for the whole sample 17 % of the total dust luminosity is not related to the recent star formation
  • In order to find counterparts of the detected objects in the AKARI Deep Field South (ADFS) in all available wavelengths, we searched public databases (NED, SIMBAD and others). Checking 500 sources brighter than 0.0482 Jy in the AKARI Wide-S band, we found 114 sources with possible counterparts, among which 78 were known galaxies. We present these sources as well as our first attempt to construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the most secure and most interesting sources among them, taking into account all the known data together with the AKARI measurements in four bands.
  • Ultraviolet (UV) galaxies have been selected from GALEX. The presence of a FUV-dropout in their spectral energy distributions proved to be a very complete (83.3%) but not very efficient (21.4%) tool for identifying Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z~1. We divide the LBG sample into two sub-classes: red LBGs (RLBGs) detected at 24 micron which are mainly Luminous IR Galaxies (LIRGs) and blue LBGs (BLBGs) undetected at 24 microns down to 83 microJy. Two of the RLBGs are also detected at 70 micron. The median SED of the RLBGs is similar (above lambda~1 micron) to the dusty starburst HR10. However, unlike local (U)LIRGs, RLBGs are UV bright objects. We suggest that these objects contain a large amount of dust but that some bare stellar populations are also directly visible. The median SED of the BLBGs is consistent with their containing the same stellar population as the RLBGs but with a lower dust content. The luminosity function of our LBG sample at z~1 is similar to the luminosity function of NUV-selected galaxies at the same redshift. The integrated luminosity densities of z~1 LBGs and NUV-selected galaxies are very consistent. We show that star formation rates (SFRs) estimated from UV measurements and corrected using the IRX-beta method provide average total SFR_TOT in agreement with SFR_UV + SFR_dust. However, IRX-beta-based SFR_TOT shows a large dispersion. Summing up the detected UV (1150A rest-frame) and IR-based star formation rates of the detected objects, we find that only one third of the total (i.e. UV + dust) LBG SFR resides in BLBGs and two thirds in RLBGs, even though most LBGs at z~1 are BLBGs. On the other hand, the total SFR of LBGs accounts for only 11% of the total SFR at z~1. Finally, we observe a regular decrease of L_TIR / L_FUV from z=0 to z~2 for UV-selected samples.
  • We study the ultraviolet to far-infrared (hereafter UV-to-IR) SEDs of a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 0.7) UV-selected galaxies from the ELAIS-N1 and ELAIS-N2 fields by fitting a multi-wavelength dataset to a library of GRASIL templates. Star formation related properties of the galaxies are derived from the library of models by using the Bayesian statistics. We find a decreasing presence of galaxies with low attenuation and low total luminosity as redshift decreases, which does not hold for high total luminosity galaxies. In addition the dust attenuation of low mass galaxies increases as redshift decreases, and this trend seems to disappear for galaxies with M* > 10^11 M_sun. This result is consistent with a mass dependent evolution of the dust to gas ratio, which could be driven by a mass dependent efficiency of star formation in star forming galaxies. The specific star formation rates (SSFR) decrease with increasing stellar mass at all redshifts, and for a given stellar mass the SSFR decreases with decreasing redshift. The differences in the slope of the M*--SSFR relation found between this work and others at similar redshift could be explained by the adopted selection criteria of the samples which, for a UV selected sample, favours blue, star forming galaxies.
  • This work presents the main ultraviolet (UV) and far-infrared (FIR) properties of two samples of nearby galaxies selected from the GALEX ($\lambda = 2315$\AA, hereafter NUV) and IRAS ($\lambda = 60\mu$m) surveys respectively. They are built in order to get detection at both wavelengths for most of the galaxies. Star formation rate (SFR) estimators based on the UV and FIR emissions are compared. Systematic differences are found between the SFR estimators for individual galaxies based on the NUV fluxes corrected for dust attenuation and on the total IR luminosity. A combined estimator based on NUV and IR luminosities seems to be the best proxy over the whole range of values of SFR. Although both samples present similar average values of the birthrate parameter b, their star-formation-related properties are substantially different: NUV-selected galaxies tend to show larger values of $b$ for lower masses, SFRs and dust attenuations, supporting previous scenarios for the star formation history (SFH). Conversely, about 20% of the FIR-selected galaxies show high values of $b$, SFR and NUV attenuation. These galaxies, most of them being LIRGs and ULIRGs, break down the downsizing picture for the SFH, however their relative contribution per unit volume is small in the local Universe. Finally, the cosmic SFR density of the local Universe is estimated in a consistent way from the NUV and IR luminosities.
  • Before the end of 2002 will be launched the GALEX satellite (a NASA/SMEX project) which will observe all the sky in Ultraviolet (UV) through filters at 1500 and 2300 A down to m(AB) 21. In 2004 will be launched the ASTRO-F satellite which will perform an all sky survey at Far-Infrared (FIR) wavelengths. The cross-correlation of both surveys will lead to very large samples of galaxies for which FIR and UV fluxes will be available. Using the FIR to UV flux ratio as a quantitative tracer of the dust extinction we will be able to measure the extinction in the nearby universe (z<0.2) and to perform a statistically significant analysis of the extinction as a function of galactic properties. Of particular interest is the construction of pure FIR and UV selected samples for which the extinction will be measured as templates for the observation of high redshift galaxies.