• Topological superconductors, whose edge hosts Majorana bound states or Majorana fermions that obey non-Abelian statistics, can be used for low-decoherence quantum computations. Most of the proposed topological superconductors are realized with spin-helical states through proximity effect to BCS superconductors. However, such approaches are difficult for further studies and applications because of the low transition temperatures and complicated hetero-structures. Here by using high-resolution spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we discover that the iron-based superconductor FeTe1-xSex (x = 0.45, Tc = 14.5 K) hosts Dirac-cone type spin-helical surface states at Fermi level, which open an s-wave SC gap below Tc. Our study proves that the surface states of FeTe0.55Se0.45 are 2D topologically superconducting, and thus provides a simple and possibly high-Tc platform for realizing Majorana fermions.
  • Topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs) exhibit bulk Dirac cones protected by time reversal and crystal symmetry, as well as surface states originating from non-trivial topology. While there is a manifold possible onset of superconducting order in such systems, few observations of intrinsic superconductivity have so far been reported for TDSs. We observe evidence for a TDS phase in FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_x$ ($x$ = 0.45), one of the high transition temperature ($T_c$) iron-based superconductors. In angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) and transport experiments, we find spin-polarized states overlapping with the bulk states on the (001) surface, and linear magnetoresistance (MR) starting from 6 T. Combined, this strongly suggests the existence of a TDS phase, which is confirmed by theoretical calculations. In total, the topological electronic states in Fe(Te,Se) provide a promising high $T_c$ platform to realize multiple topological superconducting phases.
  • Topological insulators/semimetals and unconventional iron-based superconductors have attracted major attentions in condensed matter physics in the past 10 years. However, there is little overlap between these two fields, although the combination of topological states and superconducting states will produce more exotic topologically superconducting states and Majorana bound states (MBS), a promising candidate for realizing topological quantum computations. With the progress in laser-based spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with very high energy- and momentum-resolution, we directly resolved the topological insulator (TI) phase and topological Dirac semimetal (TDS) phase near Fermi level ($E_F$) in the iron-based superconductor Li(Fe,Co)As. The TI and TDS phases can be separately tuned to $E_F$ by Co doping, allowing a detailed study of different superconducting topological states in the same material. Together with the topological states in Fe(Te,Se), our study shows the ubiquitous coexistence of superconductivity and multiple topological phases in iron-based superconductors, and opens a new age for the study of high-Tc iron-based superconductors and topological superconductivity.
  • The major breakthroughs in the understanding of topological materials over the past decade were all triggered by the discovery of the Z$_2$ topological insulator (TI). In three dimensions (3D), the TI is classified as either "strong" or "weak", and experimental confirmations of the strong topological insulator (STI) rapidly followed the theoretical predictions. In contrast, the weak topological insulator has so far eluded experimental verification, since the topological surface states emerge only on particular side surfaces which are typically undetectable in real 3D crystals. Here we provide experimental evidence for the WTI state in a bismuth iodide, $\beta$-Bi4I4. Significantly, the crystal has naturally cleavable top and side planes both stacked via van-der-Waals forces, which have long been desirable for the experimental realization of the WTI state. As a definitive signature of it, we find quasi-1D Dirac TSS at the side-surface (100) while the top-surface (001) is topologically dark. Furthermore, a crystal transition from the $\beta$- to $\alpha$-phase drives a topological phase transition from a nontrivial WTI to the trivial insulator around room temperature. This topological phase, viewed as quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators stacked three-dimensionally, and excellent functionality with on/off switching will lay a foundation for new technology benefiting from highly directional spin-currents with large density protected against backscattering.
  • Recent discovery of both gapped and gapless topological phases in weakly correlated electron systems has introduced various relativistic particles and a number of exotic phenomena in condensed matter physics. The Weyl fermion is a prominent example of three dimensional (3D), gapless topological excitation, which has been experimentally identified in inversion symmetry breaking semimetals. However, their realization in spontaneously time reversal symmetry (TRS) breaking magnetically ordered states of correlated materials has so far remained hypothetical. Here, we report a set of experimental evidence for elusive magnetic Weyl fermions in Mn$_3$Sn, a non-collinear antiferromagnet that exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect even at room temperature. Detailed comparison between our angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveals significant bandwidth renormalization and damping effects due to the strong correlation among Mn 3$d$ electrons. Moreover, our transport measurements have unveiled strong evidence for the chiral anomaly of Weyl fermions, namely, the emergence of positive magnetoconductance only in the presence of parallel electric and magnetic fields. The magnetic Weyl fermions of Mn$_3$Sn have a significant technological potential, since a weak field ($\sim$ 10 mT) is adequate for controlling the distribution of Weyl points and the large fictitious field ($\sim$ a few 100 T) in the momentum space. Our discovery thus lays the foundation for a new field of science and technology involving the magnetic Weyl excitations of strongly correlated electron systems.
  • We use bulk-sensitive soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and investigate bulk electronic structures of Ce monopnictides (CeX; X=P, As, Sb and Bi). By exploiting a paradigmatic study of the band structures as a function of their spin-orbit coupling (SOC), we draw the topological phase diagram of CeX and unambiguously reveal the topological phase transition from a trivial to a nontrivial regime in going from CeP to CeBi induced by the band inversion. The underlying mechanism of the topological phase transition is elucidated in terms of SOC in concert with their semimetallic band structures. Our comprehensive observations provide a new insight into the band topology hidden in the bulk of solid states.
  • We use spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES) combined with polarization-variable laser and investigate the spin-orbit coupling effect under interband hybridization of Rashba spin-split states for the surface alloys Bi/Ag(111) and Bi/Cu(111). In addition to the conventional band mapping of photoemission for Rashba spin-splitting, the different orbital and spin parts of the surface wavefucntion are directly imaged into energy-momentum space. It is unambiguously revealed that the interband spin-orbit coupling modifies the spin and orbital character of the Rashba surface states leading to the enriched spin-orbital entanglement and the pronounced momentum dependence of the spin-polarization. The hybridization thus strongly deviates the spin and orbital characters from the standard Rashba model. The complex spin texture under interband spin-orbit hybridyzation proposed by first-principles calculation is experimentally unraveled by SARPES with a combination of p- and s-polarized light.
  • Topological phases of matter exhibit phase transitions between distinct topological classes. These phase transitions are exotic in that they do not fall within the traditional Ginzburg-Landau paradigm but are instead associated with changes in bulk topological invariants and associated topological surface states. In the case of a Weyl semimetal this phase transition is particularly unusual because it involves the creation of bulk chiral charges and the nucleation of topological Fermi arcs. Here we image a topological phase transition to a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ with changing composition $x$. Using pump-probe ultrafast angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES), we directly observe the nucleation of a topological Fermi arc at $x_c \sim 7\%$, showing the critical point of a topological Weyl phase transition. For Mo dopings $x < x_c$, we observe no Fermi arc, while for $x > x_c$, the Fermi arc gradually extends as the bulk Weyl points separate. Our results demonstrate for the first time the creation of magnetic monopoles in momentum space. Our work opens the way to manipulating chiral charge and topological Fermi arcs in Weyl semimetals for transport experiments and device applications.
  • The recent discovery of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs offers the first Weyl fermion observed in nature and dramatically broadens the classification of topological phases. However, in TaAs it has proven challenging to study the rich transport phenomena arising from emergent Weyl fermions. The series Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are inversion-breaking, layered, tunable semimetals already under study as a promising platform for new electronics and recently proposed to host Type II, or strongly Lorentz-violating, Weyl fermions. Here we report the discovery of a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ at $x = 25\%$. We use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe a topological Fermi arc above the Fermi level, demonstrating a Weyl semimetal. The excellent agreement with calculation suggests that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is the first Type II Weyl semimetal. We also find that certain Weyl points are at the Fermi level, making Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ a promising platform for transport and optics experiments on Weyl semimetals.
  • We determine the band structure and spin texture of WTe2 by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES). With the support of first-principles calculations, we reveal the existence of spin polarization of both the Fermi arc surface states and bulk Fermi pockets. Our results support WTe2 to be a type-II Weyl semimetal candidate and provide important information to understand its extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance.
  • The recent explosion of research interest in Weyl semimetals has led to many proposed Weyl semimetal candidates and a few experimental observations of a Weyl semimetal in real materials. Through this experience, we have come to appreciate that typical Weyl semimetals host many Weyl points. For instance, the first Weyl semimetal observed in experiment, TaAs, hosts 24 Weyl points. Similarly, the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series, recently under study as the first Type II Weyl semimetal, has eight Weyl points. However, it is well-understood that for a Weyl semimetal without inversion symmetry but with time-reversal symmetry, the minimum number of Weyl points is four. Realizing such a minimal Weyl semimetal is fundamentally relevant because it would offer the simplest "hydrogen atom" example of an inversion-breaking Weyl semimetal. At the same time, transport experiments and device applications may be simpler in a system with as few Weyl points as possible. Recently, TaIrTe$_4$ has been predicted to be a minimal, inversion-breaking Weyl semimetal. However, crucially, the Weyl points and Fermi arcs live entirely above the Fermi level, making them inaccessible to conventional angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Here we use pump-probe ARPES to directly access the band structure above the Fermi level in TaIrTe$_4$. We directly observe Weyl points and topological Fermi arcs, showing that TaIrTe$_4$ is a Weyl semimetal. We find that, in total, TaIrTe$_4$ has four Weyl points, providing the first example of a minimal inversion-breaking Weyl semimetal. Our results hold promise for accessing exotic transport phenomena arising in Weyl semimetals in a real material.
  • It has recently been proposed that electronic band structures in crystals give rise to a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion, which violates Lorentz invariance and, consequently, is forbidden in particle physics. It was further predicted that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ may realize such a Type II Weyl fermion. One crucial challenge is that the Weyl points in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are predicted to lie above the Fermi level. Here, by studying a simple model for a Type II Weyl cone, we clarify the importance of accessing the unoccupied band structure to demonstrate that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is a Weyl semimetal. Then, we use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe the unoccupied band structure of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. For the first time, we directly access states $> 0.2$ eV above the Fermi level. By comparing our results with $\textit{ab initio}$ calculations, we conclude that we directly observe the surface state containing the topological Fermi arc. Our work opens the way to studying the unoccupied band structure as well as the time-domain relaxation dynamics of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ and related transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • We present an angle-resolved photoemission study of the electronic structure of the three-dimensional pyrochlore iridate Nd2Ir2O7 through its magnetic metal-insulator transition. Our data reveal that metallic Nd2Ir2O7 has a quadratic band, touching the Fermi level at the Gamma point, similarly to that of Pr2Ir2O7. The Fermi node state is, therefore, a common feature of the metallic phase of the pyrochlore iridates. Upon cooling below the transition temperature, this compound exhibits a gap opening with an energy shift of quasiparticle peaks like a band gap insulator. The quasiparticle peaks are strongly suppressed, however, with further decrease of temperature, and eventually vanish at the lowest temperature, leaving a non-dispersive flat band lacking long-lived electrons. We thereby identify a remarkable crossover from Slater to Mott insulators with decreasing temperature. These observations explain the puzzling absence of Weyl points in this material, despite its proximity to the zero temperature metal-insulator transition.
  • Weyl semimetals have sparked intense research interest, but experimental work has been limited to the TaAs family of compounds. Recently, a number of theoretical works have predicted that compounds in the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series are Weyl semimetals. Such proposals are particularly exciting because Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ has a quasi two-dimensional crystal structure well-suited to many transport experiments, while WTe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ have already been the subject of numerous proposals for device applications. However, with available ARPES techniques it is challenging to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. According to the predictions, the Weyl points are above the Fermi level, the system approaches two critical points as a function of doping, there are many irrelevant bulk bands, the Fermi arcs are nearly degenerate with bulk bands and the bulk band gap is small. Here, we study Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ for $x = 0.07$ and 0.45 using pump-probe ARPES. The system exhibits a dramatic response to the pump laser and we successfully access states $> 0.2$eV above the Fermi level. For the first time, we observe direct, experimental signatures of Fermi arcs in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$, which agree well with theoretical calculations of the surface states. However, we caution that the interpretation of these features depends sensitively on free parameters in the surface state calculation. We comment on the prospect of conclusively demonstrating a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$.
  • Strong spin-orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin-orbit and strong electron-electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a nontrivial state with a single point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behavior is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semi-metal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.
  • A Weyl semimetal is a new state of matter that host Weyl fermions as quasiparticle excitations. The Weyl fermions at zero energy correspond to points of bulk band degeneracy, Weyl nodes, which are separated in momentum space and are connected only through the crystal's boundary by an exotic Fermi arc surface state. We experimentally measure the spin polarization of the Fermi arcs in the first experimentally discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. Our spin data, for the first time, reveal that the Fermi arcs' spin polarization magnitude is as large as 80% and possesses a spin texture that is completely in-plane. Moreover, we demonstrate that the chirality of the Weyl nodes in TaAs cannot be inferred by the spin texture of the Fermi arcs. The observed non-degenerate property of the Fermi arcs is important for the establishment of its exact topological nature, which reveal that spins on the arc form a novel type of 2D matter. Additionally, the nearly full spin polarization we observed (~80%) may be useful in spintronic applications.
  • In contrast to a complex feature of antinodal state, suffering from competing order(s), the "pure" pairing gap of cuprates is obtained in the nodal region, which therefore holds the key to the superconducting mechanism. One of the biggest question is whether the point nodal state as a hallmark of d-wave pairing collapses at Tc like the BCS-type superconductors, or it instead survives above Tc turning into the preformed pair state. A difficulty in this issue comes from the small magnitude of the nodal gap, which has been preventing experimentalists from solving it. Here we use a laser ARPES capable of ultrahigh energy resolution, and detect the point nodes surviving far beyond Tc in Bi2212. By tracking the temperature evolution of spectra, we reveal that the superconductivity occurs when the pair breaking rate is suppressed smaller than the single particle scattering rate on cooling, which governs the value of Tc in cuprates.
  • The unclear relationship between cuprate superconductivity and the pseudogap state remains an impediment to understanding the high transition temperature (Tc) superconducting mechanism. Here we employ magnetic-field-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy to provide phase-sensitive proof that d-wave superconductivity coexists with the pseudogap on the antinodal Fermi surface of an overdoped cuprate. Furthermore, by tracking the hole doping (p) dependence of the quasiparticle interference pattern within a single Bi-based cuprate family, we observe a Fermi surface reconstruction slightly below optimal doping, indicating a zero-field quantum phase transition in notable proximity to the maximum superconducting Tc. Surprisingly, this major reorganization of the system's underlying electronic structure has no effect on the smoothly evolving pseudogap.
  • In contrast to a complex feature of antinodal state, suffering from competing order(s), the "pure" pairing gap of cuprates is detected in the nodal region, which therefore holds the key to the superconducting mechanism. The pairing gap has been viewed to be rather conventional, closing at the superconducting transition temperature (Tc). However, the density of states contributed from the nodal region was claimed to have a gap-like structure even above Tc. Here we present a missing evidence for a single-particle gap near the node signifying the realization of a phase incoherent d-wave superconductivity above Tc in the optimally doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d. We find that the pair formation is formulated by momentum-independent temperature evolutions of three parameters: a BCS-type energy gap (Delta), a single particle scattering rate (Gamma_single) and a pair breaking rate (Gamma_pair). The superconductivity occurs when the Gamma_pair value is suppressed smaller than Gamma_single on cooling, and the magnitude of Tc in cuprates is governed by a condition of Gamma_single(Tc)=Gamma_pair(Tc).
  • We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather then preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair~150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates "artificial" Fermi arcs for Tc<T<Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. We demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.
  • The Kondo insulator SmB6 has long been known to exhibit low temperature transport anomalies whose origin is of great interest. Here we uniquely access the surface electronic structure of the anomalous transport regime by combining state-of-the-art laser- and synchrotron-based angle-resolved photoemission techniques. We observe clear in-gap states (up to 4 meV), whose temperature dependence is contingent upon the Kondo gap formation. In addition, our observed in-gap Fermi surface oddness tied with the Kramers' points topology, their coexistence with the two-dimensional transport anomaly in the Kondo hybridization regime, as well as their robustness against thermal recycling, taken together, collectively provide by-far the strongest evidence for protected surface metallicity with a Fermi surface whose topology is consistent with the theoretically predicted topological surface Fermi surface (TSS). Our observations of systematic surface electronic structure provide the fundamental electronic parameters for the anomalous Kondo ground state of the correlated electron material SmB6.
  • Quasiparticle dynamics on the topological surface state of Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, and superconducting CuxBi2Se3 are studied by 7 eV laser-based angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find strong mode-couplings in the Dirac-cone surface states at energies of ~3 and ~15-20 meV, which leads to an exceptionally large coupling constant of ~3, which is one of the strongest ever reported for any material. This result is compatible with the recent observation of a strong Kohn anomaly in the surface phonon dispersion of Bi2Se3, but it appears that the theoretically proposed "spin-plasmon" excitations realized in helical metals are also playing an important role. Intriguingly, the ~3 meV mode coupling is found to be enhanced in the superconducting state of CuxBi2Se3.
  • The nodal band-dispersion in (Bi,Pb)2(Sr,La)2CuO6+d (Bi2201) is investigated over a wide range of doping by using 7-eV laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find that the low-energy band renormalization ("kink"), recently discovered in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d (Bi2212), also occurs in Bi2201, but at a binding energy around half that in Bi2212, implying its scaling to Tc. Surprisingly the coupling-energy dramatically increases with a decrease of carrier concentration, showing a sharp enhancement across the optimal doping. This strongly contrasts to other mode-couplings at higher binding-energies (~20, ~40, and ~70 meV) with almost no doping variation in energy scale. These nontrivial properties of the low-energy kink (material- and doping-dependence of the coupling-energy) demonstrate the significant correlation among the mode-coupling, the Tc, and the strong electron correlation.
  • The Fermi surface in the state of cuprates is highly unusual because it appears to consist of disconnected segments called arcs. Their very existence challenges the traditional concept of a Fermi surface as closed contours of gapless excitations in momentum space. The length of the arcs in the pseudogap state was thought to linearly increase with temperature, pointing to the existence of a nodal liquid state below T*. These results were interpreted as an interplay of a d-wave pairing gap and strong scattering. Understanding the properties of the arcs is a pre-requisite to understanding the origin of the pseudogap and the physics of the cuprates. Here we use a novel approach to detect the energy gaps based on the temperature dependence of the density of states. With a significantly improved sensitivity, we demonstrate that the arcs form rapidly at T* and their length remains surprisingly constant over an extended temperature range between T* and Tarc, consistent with the presence of an ordered state below T*. These arcs span fixed points in the momentum space defining a set of wave vectors, which are the fingerprints of the ordered state that causes the pseudogap.
  • A complicating factor in unraveling the theory of high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductivity is the presence of a "pseudogap" in the density of states, whose origin has been debated since its discovery [1]. Some believe the pseudogap is a broken symmetry state distinct from superconductivity [2-4], while others believe it arises from short-range correlations without symmetry breaking [5,6]. A number of broken symmetries have been imaged and identified with the pseudogap state [7,8], but it remains crucial to disentangle any electronic symmetry breaking from pre-existing structural symmetry of the crystal. We use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to observe an orthorhombic structural distortion across the cuprate superconducting Bi2Sr2Can-1CunO2n+4+x (BSCCO) family tree, which breaks two-dimensional inversion symmetry in the surface BiO layer. Although this inversion symmetry breaking structure can impact electronic measurements, we show from its insensitivity to temperature, magnetic field, and doping, that it cannot be the long-sought pseudogap state. To detect this picometer-scale variation in lattice structure, we have implemented a new algorithm which will serve as a powerful tool in the search for broken symmetry electronic states in cuprates, as well as in other materials.