• The structure of interactions in most of animals and human societies can be best represented by complex hierarchical networks. In order to maintain close to optimal functioning both stability and adaptability are necessary. Here we investigate the stability of hierarchical networks that emerge from the simulations of an organization-type having an efficiency function reminiscent of the Hamiltonian of spin-glasses. Using this quantitative approach we find a number of expected (from everyday observations) and highly non-trivial results for the obtained locally optimal networks, including such as: i) stability increases with growing efficiency and level of hierarchy, ii) the same perturbation results in a larger change for more efficient states, iii) networks with a lower level of hierarchy become more efficient after perturbation, iv) due to the huge number of possible optimal states only a small fraction of them exhibits resilience and, finally, v) "attacks" targeting the nodes selectively (regarding their position in the hierarchy) can result in paradoxical outcomes.
  • This book is concerned with the various aspects of hierarchical collective behaviour which is manifested by most complex systems in nature. From the many of the possible topics, we plan to present a selection of those that we think are useful from the point of shedding light from very different directions onto our quite general subject. Our intention is to both present the essential contributions by the existing approaches as well as go significantly beyond the results obtained by traditional methods by applying a more quantitative approach then the common ones (there are many books on qualitative interpretations). In addition to considering hierarchy in systems made of similar kinds of units, we shall concentrate on problems involving either dominance relations or the process of collective decision-making from various viewpoints.
  • In order to keep their cohesiveness during locomotion gregarious animals must make collective decisions. Many species boast complex societies with multiple levels of communities. A common case is when two dominant levels exist, one corresponding to leaders and the other consisting of followers. In this paper we study the collective motion of such two-level assemblies of self-propelled particles. We present a model adapted from one originally proposed to describe the movement of cells resulting in a smoothly varying coherent motion. We shall use the terminology corresponding to large groups of some mammals where leaders and followers form a group called a harem. We study the emergence (self-organization) of sub-groups within a herd during locomotion by computer simulations. The resulting processes are compared with our prior observations of a Przewalski horse herd (Hortob\'agy, Hungary) which we use as results from a published case study. We find that the model reproduces key features of a herd composed of harems moving on open ground, including fights for followers between leaders and bachelor groups (group of leaders without followers). One of our findings, however, does not agree with the observations. While in our model the emerging group size distribution is normal, the group size distribution of the observed herd based on historical data have been found to follow lognormal distribution. We argue that this indicates that the formation (and the size) of the harems must involve a more complex social topology than simple spatial-distance based interactions.
  • We propose a bio-inspired, agent-based approach to describe the natural phenomenon of group chasing in both two and three dimensions. Using a set of local interaction rules we created a continuous-space and discrete-time model with time delay, external noise and limited acceleration. We implemented a unique collective chasing strategy, optimized its parameters and studied its properties when chasing a much faster, erratic escaper. We show that collective chasing strategies can significantly enhance the chasers' success rate. Our realistic approach handles group chasing within closed, soft boundaries - contrasting most of those published in the literature with periodic ones -- and resembles several properties of pursuits observed in nature, such as the emergent encircling or the escaper's zigzag motion.
  • The question of why and how animal and human groups form temporarily stable hierarchical organizations has long been a great challenge from the point of quantitative interpretations. The prevailing observation/consensus is that a hierarchical social or technological structure is optimal considering a variety of aspects. Here we introduce a simple quantitative interpretation of this situation using an approach reminiscent of those developed for describing complex behaviour in terms of statistical mechanics. We look for the optimum of the efficiency function $E_{\rm eff}=1/N \sum_{i,j} J_{ij} a_i a_j$ with $J_{ij}$ denoting the nature of the interaction between the units $i$ and $j$ and $a_i$ standing for the ability of member $i$ to contribute to the efficiency of the system. Notably, this expression for $E_{\rm eff}$ has a similar structure to that of the energy as defined for spin-glasses. There is, however, an essential and novel feature of our approach: instead of optimizing by looking for a locally optimal state of the units in the nodes of a pre-defined network, we search for extrema in the complex efficiency landscape by finding locally optimal network topologies using a standard Monte Carlo method.
  • An essential task of groups is to provide efficient solutions for the complex problems they face. Indeed, considerable efforts have been devoted to the question of collective decision-making related to problems involving a single dominant feature. Here we introduce a quantitative formalism for finding the optimal distribution of the group members' competences in the more typical case when the underlying problem is complex, i.e., multidimensional. Thus, we consider teams that are aiming at obtaining the best possible answer to a problem having a number of independent sub-problems. Our approach is based on a generic scheme for the process of evaluating the proposed solutions (i.e., negotiation). We demonstrate that the best performing groups have at least one specialist for each sub-problem -- but a far less intuitive result is that finding the optimal solution by the interacting group members requires that the specialists also have some insight into the sub-problems beyond their unique field(s). We present empirical results obtained by using a large-scale database of citations being in good agreement with the above theory. The framework we have developed can easily be adapted to a variety of realistic situations since taking into account the weights of the sub-problems, the opinions or the relations of the group is straightforward. Consequently, our method can be used in several contexts, especially when the optimal composition of a group of decision-makers is designed.
  • Collective animal movements produce spectacular natural phenomena that arise from simple local interactions among group members. Flocks of homing pigeons, Columba livia, provide a useful model for the study of collective motion and decision making. During homing flights, flock members are forced to resolve potentially divergent navigational preferences in order to stay together and benefit from flying in a group. Recent work has demonstrated that some individuals consistently contribute more to the movement decisions of the flock than others do, thereby generating stable hierarchical leader/follower networks. Yet, what attributes of a flying pigeon reliably predict leadership remains an open question. We examined the flexibility of an individual's hierarchical leadership rank (i.e. its ordinal position when flock members are ranked according to the average time differences with which they lead or follow others) as a function of changes in its navigational knowledge. We manipulated already established hierarchical networks in three different flocks, by providing certain individuals with additional homing experience. We found that such training did not consistently lead to an increase in birds' leadership ranks, and that, in general, the nature of leader/follower interactions between trained and untrained birds remained unaffected. Thus, leadership hierarchies in pigeon flocks appear resistant to changes in the navigational knowledge of a subset of their members, at least when these changes are relatively small. We discuss the implications of our results in light of the potential benefits of structural stability in decision-making networks.
  • We have studied the conditions of rotation induced by collimated light carrying no angular momentum. Objects of different shapes and optical properties were examined in the nontrivial case where the rotation axis is perpendicular to the direction of light propagation. This geometry offers important advantages for application as it fundamentally broadens the possible practical arrangements to be realised. We found that collimated light cannot drive permanent rotation of 2D or prism-like 3D objects (i.e. fixed cross-sectional profile along the rotation axis) in the case of fully reflective or fully transparent materials. Based on both geometrical optics simulations and theoretical analysis, we derived a general condition for rotation induced by collimated light carrying no angular momentum valid for any arrangement: Permanent rotation is not possible if the scattering interaction is two-dimensional and lossless. In contrast, light induced rotation can be sustained if partial absorption is present or the object has specific true 3D geometry. We designed, simulated, fabricated, and experimentally tested a microscopic rotor capable of rotation around an axis perpendicular to the illuminating light.
  • Scientific journals are the repositories of the gradually accumulating knowledge of mankind about the world surrounding us. Just as our knowledge is organised into classes ranging from major disciplines, subjects and fields to increasingly specific topics, journals can also be categorised into groups using various metrics. In addition to the set of topics characteristic for a journal, they can also be ranked regarding their relevance from the point of overall influence. One widespread measure is impact factor, but in the present paper we intend to reconstruct a much more detailed description by studying the hierarchical relations between the journals based on citation data. We use a measure related to the notion of m-reaching centrality and find a network which shows the level of influence of a journal from the point of the direction and efficiency with which information spreads through the network. We can also obtain an alternative network using a suitably modified nested hierarchy extraction method applied to the same data. The results are weakly methodology-dependent and reveal non-trivial relations among journals. The two alternative hierarchies show large similarity with some striking differences, providing together a complex picture of the intricate relations between scientific journals.
  • Gregarious animals need to make collective decisions in order to keep their cohesiveness. Several species of them live in multilevel societies, and form herds composed of smaller communities. We present a model for the development of a leadership hierarchy in a herd consisting of loosely connected sub-groups (e.g. harems) by combining self organization and social dynamics. It starts from unfamiliar individuals without relationships and reproduces the emergence of a hierarchical and modular leadership network that promotes an effective spreading of the decisions from more capable individuals to the others, and thus gives rise to a beneficial collective decision. Our results stemming from the model are in a good agreement with our observations of a Przewalski horse herd (Hortob\'agy, Hungary). We find that the harem-leader to harem-member ratio observed in Przewalski horses corresponds to an optimal network in this approach regarding common success, and that the observed and modeled harem size distributions are close to a lognormal.
  • We present the first decentralized multi-copter flock that performs stable autonomous outdoor flight with up to 10 flying agents. By decentralized and autonomous we mean that all members navigate themselves based on the dynamic information received from other robots in the vicinity. We do not use central data processing or control; instead, all the necessary computations are carried out by miniature on-board computers. The only global information the system exploits is from GPS receivers, while the units use wireless modules to share this positional information with other flock members locally. Collective behavior is based on a decentralized control framework with bio-inspiration from statistical physical modelling of animal swarms. In addition, the model is optimized for stable group flight even in a noisy, windy, delayed and error-prone environment. Using this framework we successfully implemented several fundamental collective flight tasks with up to 10 units: i) we achieved self-propelled flocking in a bounded area with self-organized object avoidance capabilities and ii) performed collective target tracking with stable formation flights (grid, rotating ring, straight line). With realistic numerical simulations we demonstrated that the local broadcast-type communication and the decentralized autonomous control method allows for the scalability of the model for much larger flocks.
  • A number of novel experimental and theoretical results have recently been obtained on active soft matter, demonstrating the various interesting universal and anomalous features of this kind of driven systems. Here we consider a fundamental but still unexplored aspect of the patterns arising in the system of actively moving units, i.e., their segregation taking place when two kinds of them with different adhesive properties are present. The process of segregation is studied by a model made of self-propelled particles such that the particles have a tendency to adhere only to those which are of the same kind. The calculations corresponding to the related differential equations can be made in parallel, thus a powerful GPU card allows large scale simulations. We find that the segregation kinetics is very different from the non-driven counterparts and is described by the new scaling exponents $z\simeq 1$ and $z\simeq 0.8$ for the 1:1 and the non-equal ratio of the two constituents, respectively. Our results are in agreement with a recent observation of segregating tissue cells \emph{in vitro}.
  • Swarming or collective motion of living entities is one of the most common and spectacular manifestations of living systems having been extensively studied in recent years. A number of general principles have been established. The interactions at the level of cells are quite different from those among individual animals therefore the study of collective motion of cells is likely to reveal some specific important features which are overviewed in this paper. In addition to presenting the most appealing results from the quickly growing related literature we also deliver a critical discussion of the emerging picture and summarize our present understanding of collective motion at the cellular level. Collective motion of cells plays an essential role in a number of experimental and real-life situations. In most cases the coordinated motion is a helpful aspect of the given phenomenon and results in making a related process more efficient (e.g., embryogenesis or wound healing), while in the case of tumor cell invasion it appears to speed up the progression of the disease. In these mechanisms cells both have to be motile and adhere to one another, the adherence feature being the most specific to this sort of collective behavior. One of the central aims of this review is both presenting the related experimental observations and treating them in the light of a few basic computational models so as to make an interpretation of the phenomena at a quantitative level as well.
  • Animal swarms displaying a variety of typical flocking patterns would not exist without underlying safe, optimal and stable dynamics of the individuals. The emergence of these universal patterns can be efficiently reconstructed with agent-based models. If we want to reproduce these patterns with artificial systems, such as autonomous aerial robots, agent-based models can also be used in the control algorithm of the robots. However, finding the proper algorithms and thus understanding the essential characteristics of the emergent collective behaviour of robots requires the thorough and realistic modeling of the robot and the environment as well. In this paper, first, we present an abstract mathematical model of an autonomous flying robot. The model takes into account several realistic features, such as time delay and locality of the communication, inaccuracy of the on-board sensors and inertial effects. We present two decentralized control algorithms. One is based on a simple self-propelled flocking model of animal collective motion, the other is a collective target tracking algorithm. Both algorithms contain a viscous friction-like term, which aligns the velocities of neighbouring agents parallel to each other. We show that this term can be essential for reducing the inherent instabilities of such a noisy and delayed realistic system. We discuss simulation results about the stability of the control algorithms, and perform real experiments to show the applicability of the algorithms on a group of autonomous quadcopters.
  • Measuring science is based on comparing articles to similar others. However, keyword-based groups of thematically similar articles are dominantly small. These small sizes keep the statistical errors of comparisons high. With the growing availability of bibliographic data such statistical errors can be reduced by merging methods of thematic grouping, citation networks and keyword co-usage.
  • Power grids, road maps, and river streams are examples of infrastructural networks which are highly vulnerable to external perturbations. An abrupt local change of load (voltage, traffic density, or water level) might propagate in a cascading way and affect a significant fraction of the network. Almost discontinuous perturbations can be modeled by shock waves which can eventually interfere constructively and endanger the normal functionality of the infrastructure. We study their dynamics by solving the Burgers equation under random perturbations on several real and artificial directed graphs. Even for graphs with a narrow distribution of node properties (e.g., degree or betweenness), a steady state is reached exhibiting a heterogeneous load distribution, having a difference of one order of magnitude between the highest and average loads. Unexpectedly we find for the European power grid and for finite Watts-Strogatz networks a broad pronounced bimodal distribution for the loads. To identify the most vulnerable nodes, we introduce the concept of node-basin size, a purely topological property which we show to be strongly correlated to the average load of a node.
  • Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications.
  • Many of the essential features of the evolution of scientific research are imprinted in the structure of citation networks. Connections in these networks imply information about the transfer of knowledge among papers, or in other words, edges describe the impact of papers on other publications. This inherent meaning of the edges infers that citation networks can exhibit hierarchical features, that is typical of networks based on decision-making. In this paper, we investigate the hierarchical structure of citation networks consisting of papers in the same field. We find that the majority of the networks follow a universal trend towards a highly hierarchical state, and i) the various fields display differences only concerning their phase in life (distance from the "birth" of a field) or ii) the characteristic time according to which they are approaching the stationary state. We also show by a simple argument that the alterations in the behavior are related to and can be understood by the degree of specialization corresponding to the fields. Our results suggest that during the accumulation of knowledge in a given field, some papers are gradually becoming relatively more influential than most of the other papers.
  • Animals foraging alone are hypothesized to optimize the encounter rates with resources through L\'evy walks. However, the issue of how the interactions between multiple foragers influence their search efficiency is still not completely understood. To address this, we consider a model to study the optimal strategy for a group of foragers searching for targets distributed heterogeneously. In our model foragers move on a square lattice containing immobile but regenerative targets. At any instant a forager is able to detect only those targets that happen to be in the same site. However, we allow the foragers to have information about the state of other foragers. A forager who has not detected any target walks towards the nearest location, where another forager has detected a target, with probability $\exp{\left(-\alpha d\right)}$, where $d$ is the distance and $\alpha$ is a parameter. The model reveals that neither overcrowding ($\alpha\to 0$) nor independent searching ($\alpha\to\infty$) is beneficial for the group. For patchy distribution of targets the efficiency is maximum for intermediate values of $\alpha$. Also, in the limit $\alpha\to 0$, the length of the walks can become scale-free.
  • Groups of people or even robots often face problems they need to solve together. Examples include collectively searching for resources, choosing when and where to invest time and effort, and many more. Although a hierarchical ordering of the relevance of the group members' inputs during collective decision making is abundant, a quantitative demonstration of its origin and advantages using a generic approach has not been described yet. Here we introduce a family of models based on the most general features of group decision making to show that the optimal distribution of competences is a highly skewed function with a structured fat tail. Our results have been obtained by optimizing the groups' compositions through identifying the best performing distributions for both the competences and for the members' flexibilities/pliancies. Potential applications include choosing the best composition for a group intended to solve a given task.
  • One of the most remarkable social phenomena is the formation of communities in social networks corresponding to families, friendship circles, work teams, etc. Since people usually belong to several different communities at the same time, the induced overlaps result in an extremely complicated web of the communities themselves. Thus, uncovering the intricate community structure of social networks is a non-trivial task with great potential for practical applications, gaining a notable interest in the recent years. The Clique Percolation Method (CPM) is one of the earliest overlapping community finding methods, which was already used in the analysis of several different social networks. In this approach the communities correspond to k-clique percolation clusters, and the general heuristic for setting the parameters of the method is to tune the system just below the critical point of k-clique percolation. However, this rule is based on simple physical principles and its validity was never subject to quantitative analysis. Here we examine the quality of the partitioning in the vicinity of the critical point using recently introduced overlapping modularity measures. According to our results on real social- and other networks, the overlapping modularities show a maximum close to the critical point, justifying the original criteria for the optimal parameter settings.
  • Hierarchy is one of the most conspicuous features of numerous natural, technological and social systems. The underlying structures are typically complex and their most relevant organizational principle is the ordering of the ties among the units they are made of according to a network displaying hierarchical features. In spite of the abundant presence of hierarchy no quantitative theoretical interpretation of the origins of a multi-level, knowledge-based social network exists. Here we introduce an approach which is capable of reproducing the emergence of a multi-levelled network structure based on the plausible assumption that the individuals (representing the nodes of the network) can make the right estimate about the state of their changing environment to a varying degree. Our model accounts for a fundamental feature of knowledge-based organizations: the less capable individuals tend to follow those who are better at solving the problems they all face. We find that relatively simple rules lead to hierarchical self-organization and the specific structures we obtain possess the two, perhaps most important features of complex systems: a simultaneous presence of adaptability and stability. In addition, the performance (success score) of the emerging networks is significantly higher than the average expected score of the individuals without letting them copy the decisions of the others. The results of our calculations are in agreement with a related experiment and can be useful from the point of designing the optimal conditions for constructing a given complex social structure as well as understanding the hierarchical organization of such biological structures of major importance as the regulatory pathways or the dynamics of neural networks.
  • We introduce a system of light driven microscopic autonomous moving particles that move on a flat surface. The design is simple, yet effective: Micrometer sized objects with wedge shape are produced by photopolymerization, they are covered with a reflective surface. When the area of motion is illuminated perpendicularly from above, the light is deflected to the side by the wedge shaped objects, in the direction determined by the position and orientation of the particles. The momentum change during reflection provides the driving force for an effectively autonomous motion. The system is an efficient tool to study self propelled microscopic robots.
  • We study the behavior of the clustering coefficient in tagged networks. The rich variety of tags associated with the nodes in the studied systems provide additional information about the entities represented by the nodes which can be important for practical applications like searching in the networks. Here we examine how the clustering coefficient changes when narrowing the network to a sub-graph marked by a given tag, and how does it correlate with various other properties of the sub-graph. Another interesting question addressed in the paper is how the clustering coefficient of the individual nodes is affected by the tags on the node. We believe these sort of analysis help acquiring a more complete description of the structure of large complex systems.
  • The amount of available data about complex systems is increasing every year, measurements of larger and larger systems are collected and recorded. A natural representation of such data is given by networks, whose size is following the size of the original system. The current trend of multiple cores in computing infrastructures call for a parallel reimplementation of earlier methods. Here we present the grid version of CFinder, which can locate overlapping communities in directed, weighted or undirected networks based on the clique percolation method (CPM). We show that the computation of the communities can be distributed among several CPU-s or computers. Although switching to the parallel version not necessarily leads to gain in computing time, it definitely makes the community structure of extremely large networks accessible.