• We prove that stochastic gradient descent efficiently converges to the global optimizer of the maximum likelihood objective of an unknown linear time-invariant dynamical system from a sequence of noisy observations generated by the system. Even though the objective function is non-convex, we provide polynomial running time and sample complexity bounds under strong but natural assumptions. Linear systems identification has been studied for many decades, yet, to the best of our knowledge, these are the first polynomial guarantees for the problem we consider.
  • Word embeddings are ubiquitous in NLP and information retrieval, but it is unclear what they represent when the word is polysemous. Here it is shown that multiple word senses reside in linear superposition within the word embedding and simple sparse coding can recover vectors that approximately capture the senses. The success of our approach, which applies to several embedding methods, is mathematically explained using a variant of the random walk on discourses model (Arora et al., 2016). A novel aspect of our technique is that each extracted word sense is accompanied by one of about 2000 "discourse atoms" that gives a succinct description of which other words co-occur with that word sense. Discourse atoms can be of independent interest, and make the method potentially more useful. Empirical tests are used to verify and support the theory.
  • Matrix completion is a basic machine learning problem that has wide applications, especially in collaborative filtering and recommender systems. Simple non-convex optimization algorithms are popular and effective in practice. Despite recent progress in proving various non-convex algorithms converge from a good initial point, it remains unclear why random or arbitrary initialization suffices in practice. We prove that the commonly used non-convex objective function for \textit{positive semidefinite} matrix completion has no spurious local minima --- all local minima must also be global. Therefore, many popular optimization algorithms such as (stochastic) gradient descent can provably solve positive semidefinite matrix completion with \textit{arbitrary} initialization in polynomial time. The result can be generalized to the setting when the observed entries contain noise. We believe that our main proof strategy can be useful for understanding geometric properties of other statistical problems involving partial or noisy observations.
  • An emerging design principle in deep learning is that each layer of a deep artificial neural network should be able to easily express the identity transformation. This idea not only motivated various normalization techniques, such as \emph{batch normalization}, but was also key to the immense success of \emph{residual networks}. In this work, we put the principle of \emph{identity parameterization} on a more solid theoretical footing alongside further empirical progress. We first give a strikingly simple proof that arbitrarily deep linear residual networks have no spurious local optima. The same result for linear feed-forward networks in their standard parameterization is substantially more delicate. Second, we show that residual networks with ReLu activations have universal finite-sample expressivity in the sense that the network can represent any function of its sample provided that the model has more parameters than the sample size. Directly inspired by our theory, we experiment with a radically simple residual architecture consisting of only residual convolutional layers and ReLu activations, but no batch normalization, dropout, or max pool. Our model improves significantly on previous all-convolutional networks on the CIFAR10, CIFAR100, and ImageNet classification benchmarks.
  • We show that the gradient descent algorithm provides an implicit regularization effect in the learning of over-parameterized matrix factorization models and one-hidden-layer neural networks with quadratic activations. Concretely, we show that given $\tilde{O}(dr^{2})$ random linear measurements of a rank $r$ positive semidefinite matrix $X^{\star}$, we can recover $X^{\star}$ by parameterizing it by $UU^\top$ with $U\in \mathbb R^{d\times d}$ and minimizing the squared loss, even if $r \ll d$. We prove that starting from a small initialization, gradient descent recovers $X^{\star}$ in $\tilde{O}(\sqrt{r})$ iterations approximately. The results solve the conjecture of Gunasekar et al.'17 under the restricted isometry property. The technique can be applied to analyzing neural networks with one-hidden-layer quadratic activations with some technical modifications.
  • We show that training of generative adversarial network (GAN) may not have good generalization properties; e.g., training may appear successful but the trained distribution may be far from target distribution in standard metrics. However, generalization does occur for a weaker metric called neural net distance. It is also shown that an approximate pure equilibrium exists in the discriminator/generator game for a special class of generators with natural training objectives when generator capacity and training set sizes are moderate. This existence of equilibrium inspires MIX+GAN protocol, which can be combined with any existing GAN training, and empirically shown to improve some of them.
  • Non-convex optimization with local search heuristics has been widely used in machine learning, achieving many state-of-art results. It becomes increasingly important to understand why they can work for these NP-hard problems on typical data. The landscape of many objective functions in learning has been conjectured to have the geometric property that "all local optima are (approximately) global optima", and thus they can be solved efficiently by local search algorithms. However, establishing such property can be very difficult. In this paper, we analyze the optimization landscape of the random over-complete tensor decomposition problem, which has many applications in unsupervised learning, especially in learning latent variable models. In practice, it can be efficiently solved by gradient ascent on a non-convex objective. We show that for any small constant $\epsilon > 0$, among the set of points with function values $(1+\epsilon)$-factor larger than the expectation of the function, all the local maxima are approximate global maxima. Previously, the best-known result only characterizes the geometry in small neighborhoods around the true components. Our result implies that even with an initialization that is barely better than the random guess, the gradient ascent algorithm is guaranteed to solve this problem. Our main technique uses Kac-Rice formula and random matrix theory. To our best knowledge, this is the first time when Kac-Rice formula is successfully applied to counting the number of local minima of a highly-structured random polynomial with dependent coefficients.
  • Deep neural nets have caused a revolution in many classification tasks. A related ongoing revolution---also theoretically not understood---concerns their ability to serve as generative models for complicated types of data such as images and texts. These models are trained using ideas like variational autoencoders and Generative Adversarial Networks. We take a first cut at explaining the expressivity of multilayer nets by giving a sufficient criterion for a function to be approximable by a neural network with $n$ hidden layers. A key ingredient is Barron's Theorem \cite{Barron1993}, which gives a Fourier criterion for approximability of a function by a neural network with 1 hidden layer. We show that a composition of $n$ functions which satisfy certain Fourier conditions ("Barron functions") can be approximated by a $n+1$-layer neural network. For probability distributions, this translates into a criterion for a probability distribution to be approximable in Wasserstein distance---a natural metric on probability distributions---by a neural network applied to a fixed base distribution (e.g., multivariate gaussian). Building up recent lower bound work, we also give an example function that shows that composition of Barron functions is more expressive than Barron functions alone.
  • We design a non-convex second-order optimization algorithm that is guaranteed to return an approximate local minimum in time which scales linearly in the underlying dimension and the number of training examples. The time complexity of our algorithm to find an approximate local minimum is even faster than that of gradient descent to find a critical point. Our algorithm applies to a general class of optimization problems including training a neural network and other non-convex objectives arising in machine learning.
  • Many machine learning applications use latent variable models to explain structure in data, whereby visible variables (= coordinates of the given datapoint) are explained as a probabilistic function of some hidden variables. Finding parameters with the maximum likelihood is NP-hard even in very simple settings. In recent years, provably efficient algorithms were nevertheless developed for models with linear structures: topic models, mixture models, hidden markov models, etc. These algorithms use matrix or tensor decomposition, and make some reasonable assumptions about the parameters of the underlying model. But matrix or tensor decomposition seems of little use when the latent variable model has nonlinearities. The current paper shows how to make progress: tensor decomposition is applied for learning the single-layer {\em noisy or} network, which is a textbook example of a Bayes net, and used for example in the classic QMR-DT software for diagnosing which disease(s) a patient may have by observing the symptoms he/she exhibits. The technical novelty here, which should be useful in other settings in future, is analysis of tensor decomposition in presence of systematic error (i.e., where the noise/error is correlated with the signal, and doesn't decrease as number of samples goes to infinity). This requires rethinking all steps of tensor decomposition methods from the ground up. For simplicity our analysis is stated assuming that the network parameters were chosen from a probability distribution but the method seems more generally applicable.
  • We give a novel formal theoretical framework for unsupervised learning with two distinctive characteristics. First, it does not assume any generative model and based on a worst-case performance metric. Second, it is comparative, namely performance is measured with respect to a given hypothesis class. This allows to avoid known computational hardness results and improper algorithms based on convex relaxations. We show how several families of unsupervised learning models, which were previously only analyzed under probabilistic assumptions and are otherwise provably intractable, can be efficiently learned in our framework by convex optimization.
  • We give new algorithms based on the sum-of-squares method for tensor decomposition. Our results improve the best known running times from quasi-polynomial to polynomial for several problems, including decomposing random overcomplete 3-tensors and learning overcomplete dictionaries with constant relative sparsity. We also give the first robust analysis for decomposing overcomplete 4-tensors in the smoothed analysis model. A key ingredient of our analysis is to establish small spectral gaps in moment matrices derived from solutions to sum-of-squares relaxations. To enable this analysis we augment sum-of-squares relaxations with spectral analogs of maximum entropy constraints.
  • Semantic word embeddings represent the meaning of a word via a vector, and are created by diverse methods. Many use nonlinear operations on co-occurrence statistics, and have hand-tuned hyperparameters and reweighting methods. This paper proposes a new generative model, a dynamic version of the log-linear topic model of~\citet{mnih2007three}. The methodological novelty is to use the prior to compute closed form expressions for word statistics. This provides a theoretical justification for nonlinear models like PMI, word2vec, and GloVe, as well as some hyperparameter choices. It also helps explain why low-dimensional semantic embeddings contain linear algebraic structure that allows solution of word analogies, as shown by~\citet{mikolov2013efficient} and many subsequent papers. Experimental support is provided for the generative model assumptions, the most important of which is that latent word vectors are fairly uniformly dispersed in space.
  • Recently, there has been considerable progress on designing algorithms with provable guarantees -- typically using linear algebraic methods -- for parameter learning in latent variable models. But designing provable algorithms for inference has proven to be more challenging. Here we take a first step towards provable inference in topic models. We leverage a property of topic models that enables us to construct simple linear estimators for the unknown topic proportions that have small variance, and consequently can work with short documents. Our estimators also correspond to finding an estimate around which the posterior is well-concentrated. We show lower bounds that for shorter documents it can be information theoretically impossible to find the hidden topics. Finally, we give empirical results that demonstrate that our algorithm works on realistic topic models. It yields good solutions on synthetic data and runs in time comparable to a {\em single} iteration of Gibbs sampling.
  • We study the tradeoff between the statistical error and communication cost of distributed statistical estimation problems in high dimensions. In the distributed sparse Gaussian mean estimation problem, each of the $m$ machines receives $n$ data points from a $d$-dimensional Gaussian distribution with unknown mean $\theta$ which is promised to be $k$-sparse. The machines communicate by message passing and aim to estimate the mean $\theta$. We provide a tight (up to logarithmic factors) tradeoff between the estimation error and the number of bits communicated between the machines. This directly leads to a lower bound for the distributed \textit{sparse linear regression} problem: to achieve the statistical minimax error, the total communication is at least $\Omega(\min\{n,d\}m)$, where $n$ is the number of observations that each machine receives and $d$ is the ambient dimension. These lower results improve upon [Sha14,SD'14] by allowing multi-round iterative communication model. We also give the first optimal simultaneous protocol in the dense case for mean estimation. As our main technique, we prove a \textit{distributed data processing inequality}, as a generalization of usual data processing inequalities, which might be of independent interest and useful for other problems.
  • We study distributed optimization algorithms for minimizing the average of convex functions. The applications include empirical risk minimization problems in statistical machine learning where the datasets are large and have to be stored on different machines. We design a distributed stochastic variance reduced gradient algorithm that, under certain conditions on the condition number, simultaneously achieves the optimal parallel runtime, amount of communication and rounds of communication among all distributed first-order methods up to constant factors. Our method and its accelerated extension also outperform existing distributed algorithms in terms of the rounds of communication as long as the condition number is not too large compared to the size of data in each machine. We also prove a lower bound for the number of rounds of communication for a broad class of distributed first-order methods including the proposed algorithms in this paper. We show that our accelerated distributed stochastic variance reduced gradient algorithm achieves this lower bound so that it uses the fewest rounds of communication among all distributed first-order algorithms.
  • Generative models for deep learning are promising both to improve understanding of the model, and yield training methods requiring fewer labeled samples. Recent works use generative model approaches to produce the deep net's input given the value of a hidden layer several levels above. However, there is no accompanying "proof of correctness" for the generative model, showing that the feedforward deep net is the correct inference method for recovering the hidden layer given the input. Furthermore, these models are complicated. The current paper takes a more theoretical tack. It presents a very simple generative model for RELU deep nets, with the following characteristics: (i) The generative model is just the reverse of the feedforward net: if the forward transformation at a layer is $A$ then the reverse transformation is $A^T$. (This can be seen as an explanation of the old weight tying idea for denoising autoencoders.) (ii) Its correctness can be proven under a clean theoretical assumption: the edge weights in real-life deep nets behave like random numbers. Under this assumption ---which is experimentally tested on real-life nets like AlexNet--- it is formally proved that feed forward net is a correct inference method for recovering the hidden layer. The generative model suggests a simple modification for training: use the generative model to produce synthetic data with labels and include it in the training set. Experiments are shown to support this theory of random-like deep nets; and that it helps the training.
  • This paper establishes a statistical versus computational trade-off for solving a basic high-dimensional machine learning problem via a basic convex relaxation method. Specifically, we consider the {\em Sparse Principal Component Analysis} (Sparse PCA) problem, and the family of {\em Sum-of-Squares} (SoS, aka Lasserre/Parillo) convex relaxations. It was well known that in large dimension $p$, a planted $k$-sparse unit vector can be {\em in principle} detected using only $n \approx k\log p$ (Gaussian or Bernoulli) samples, but all {\em efficient} (polynomial time) algorithms known require $n \approx k^2$ samples. It was also known that this quadratic gap cannot be improved by the the most basic {\em semi-definite} (SDP, aka spectral) relaxation, equivalent to a degree-2 SoS algorithms. Here we prove that also degree-4 SoS algorithms cannot improve this quadratic gap. This average-case lower bound adds to the small collection of hardness results in machine learning for this powerful family of convex relaxation algorithms. Moreover, our design of moments (or "pseudo-expectations") for this lower bound is quite different than previous lower bounds. Establishing lower bounds for higher degree SoS algorithms for remains a challenging problem.
  • Tensor rank and low-rank tensor decompositions have many applications in learning and complexity theory. Most known algorithms use unfoldings of tensors and can only handle rank up to $n^{\lfloor p/2 \rfloor}$ for a $p$-th order tensor in $\mathbb{R}^{n^p}$. Previously no efficient algorithm can decompose 3rd order tensors when the rank is super-linear in the dimension. Using ideas from sum-of-squares hierarchy, we give the first quasi-polynomial time algorithm that can decompose a random 3rd order tensor decomposition when the rank is as large as $n^{3/2}/\textrm{polylog} n$. We also give a polynomial time algorithm for certifying the injective norm of random low rank tensors. Our tensor decomposition algorithm exploits the relationship between injective norm and the tensor components. The proof relies on interesting tools for decoupling random variables to prove better matrix concentration bounds, which can be useful in other settings.
  • Sparse coding is a basic task in many fields including signal processing, neuroscience and machine learning where the goal is to learn a basis that enables a sparse representation of a given set of data, if one exists. Its standard formulation is as a non-convex optimization problem which is solved in practice by heuristics based on alternating minimization. Re- cent work has resulted in several algorithms for sparse coding with provable guarantees, but somewhat surprisingly these are outperformed by the simple alternating minimization heuristics. Here we give a general framework for understanding alternating minimization which we leverage to analyze existing heuristics and to design new ones also with provable guarantees. Some of these algorithms seem implementable on simple neural architectures, which was the original motivation of Olshausen and Field (1997a) in introducing sparse coding. We also give the first efficient algorithm for sparse coding that works almost up to the information theoretic limit for sparse recovery on incoherent dictionaries. All previous algorithms that approached or surpassed this limit run in time exponential in some natural parameter. Finally, our algorithms improve upon the sample complexity of existing approaches. We believe that our analysis framework will have applications in other settings where simple iterative algorithms are used.
  • We explore the connection between dimensionality and communication cost in distributed learning problems. Specifically we study the problem of estimating the mean $\vec{\theta}$ of an unknown $d$ dimensional gaussian distribution in the distributed setting. In this problem, the samples from the unknown distribution are distributed among $m$ different machines. The goal is to estimate the mean $\vec{\theta}$ at the optimal minimax rate while communicating as few bits as possible. We show that in this setting, the communication cost scales linearly in the number of dimensions i.e. one needs to deal with different dimensions individually. Applying this result to previous lower bounds for one dimension in the interactive setting \cite{ZDJW13} and to our improved bounds for the simultaneous setting, we prove new lower bounds of $\Omega(md/\log(m))$ and $\Omega(md)$ for the bits of communication needed to achieve the minimax squared loss, in the interactive and simultaneous settings respectively. To complement, we also demonstrate an interactive protocol achieving the minimax squared loss with $O(md)$ bits of communication, which improves upon the simple simultaneous protocol by a logarithmic factor. Given the strong lower bounds in the general setting, we initiate the study of the distributed parameter estimation problems with structured parameters. Specifically, when the parameter is promised to be $s$-sparse, we show a simple thresholding based protocol that achieves the same squared loss while saving a $d/s$ factor of communication. We conjecture that the tradeoff between communication and squared loss demonstrated by this protocol is essentially optimal up to logarithmic factor.
  • In dictionary learning, also known as sparse coding, the algorithm is given samples of the form $y = Ax$ where $x\in \mathbb{R}^m$ is an unknown random sparse vector and $A$ is an unknown dictionary matrix in $\mathbb{R}^{n\times m}$ (usually $m > n$, which is the overcomplete case). The goal is to learn $A$ and $x$. This problem has been studied in neuroscience, machine learning, visions, and image processing. In practice it is solved by heuristic algorithms and provable algorithms seemed hard to find. Recently, provable algorithms were found that work if the unknown feature vector $x$ is $\sqrt{n}$-sparse or even sparser. Spielman et al. \cite{DBLP:journals/jmlr/SpielmanWW12} did this for dictionaries where $m=n$; Arora et al. \cite{AGM} gave an algorithm for overcomplete ($m >n$) and incoherent matrices $A$; and Agarwal et al. \cite{DBLP:journals/corr/AgarwalAN13} handled a similar case but with weaker guarantees. This raised the problem of designing provable algorithms that allow sparsity $\gg \sqrt{n}$ in the hidden vector $x$. The current paper designs algorithms that allow sparsity up to $n/poly(\log n)$. It works for a class of matrices where features are individually recoverable, a new notion identified in this paper that may motivate further work. The algorithm runs in quasipolynomial time because they use limited enumeration.
  • We give algorithms with provable guarantees that learn a class of deep nets in the generative model view popularized by Hinton and others. Our generative model is an $n$ node multilayer neural net that has degree at most $n^{\gamma}$ for some $\gamma <1$ and each edge has a random edge weight in $[-1,1]$. Our algorithm learns {\em almost all} networks in this class with polynomial running time. The sample complexity is quadratic or cubic depending upon the details of the model. The algorithm uses layerwise learning. It is based upon a novel idea of observing correlations among features and using these to infer the underlying edge structure via a global graph recovery procedure. The analysis of the algorithm reveals interesting structure of neural networks with random edge weights.
  • We study the matroid secretary problems with submodular valuation functions. In these problems, the elements arrive in random order. When one element arrives, we have to make an immediate and irrevocable decision on whether to accept it or not. The set of accepted elements must form an {\em independent set} in a predefined matroid. Our objective is to maximize the value of the accepted elements. In this paper, we focus on the case that the valuation function is a non-negative and monotonically non-decreasing submodular function. We introduce a general algorithm for such {\em submodular matroid secretary problems}. In particular, we obtain constant competitive algorithms for the cases of laminar matroids and transversal matroids. Our algorithms can be further applied to any independent set system defined by the intersection of a {\em constant} number of laminar matroids, while still achieving constant competitive ratios. Notice that laminar matroids generalize uniform matroids and partition matroids. On the other hand, when the underlying valuation function is linear, our algorithm achieves a competitive ratio of 9.6 for laminar matroids, which significantly improves the previous result.
  • Motivated by a hat guessing problem proposed by Iwasawa \cite{Iwasawa10}, Butler and Graham \cite{Butler11} made the following conjecture on the existence of certain way of marking the {\em coordinate lines} in $[k]^n$: there exists a way to mark one point on each {\em coordinate line} in $[k]^n$, so that every point in $[k]^n$ is marked exactly $a$ or $b$ times as long as the parameters $(a,b,n,k)$ satisfies that there are non-negative integers $s$ and $t$ such that $s+t = k^n$ and $as+bt = nk^{n-1}$. In this paper we prove this conjecture for any prime number $k$. Moreover, we prove the conjecture for the case when $a=0$ for general $k$.