• New MMT/MIRAC (9-11 {\mu}m), SOFIA/FORCAST (11-37 {\mu}m), and Herschel/PACS (70 and 160 {\mu}m) infrared (IR) imaging and photometry is presented for three famous OH/IR red supergiants (NML Cyg, VX Sgr, and S Per) and two normal red supergiants (RS Per and T Per). We model the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using radiative transfer code DUSTY. Azimuthal average profiles from the SOFIA/FORCAST imaging, in addition to dust mass distribution profiles from DUSTY, constrain the mass-loss histories of these supergiants. For all of our observed supergiants, the DUSTY models suggest that constant mass-loss rates do not produce enough dust to explain the observed infrared emission in the stars' SEDs. Combining our results with Shenoy et al. (2016) (Paper I) we find mixed results with some red supergiants showing evidence for variable and high mass-loss events while others have constant mass loss over the past few thousand years.
  • We present images and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in three star-forming H II regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud: N159A, N159 Papillon, and N160. We use photometry from SOFIA/FORCAST at 25.3--37.1 um to constrain model fits to the SEDs and determine luminosities, ages, and dust content of the embedded YSOs and their local environments. By placing these sources on mid-infrared color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we analyze their dust properties and consider their evolutionary status. Since each object in the FORCAST images has an obvious bright near-infrared counterpart in Spitzer Space Telescope images, we do not find any evidence for new, very cool, previously-undiscovered Class 0 YSOs. Additionally, based on its mid-infrared colors and model parameters, N159A is younger than N160 and the Papillon. The nature of the first extragalactic protostars in N159, P1 and P2, is also discussed.
  • The supernova impostor PSN J09132750+7627410 in NGC 2748 reached a maximum luminosity of approximately -14 mag. It was quickly realized that its was not a true supernova, but another example of a non-terminal giant eruption. PSN J09132750+7627410 is distinguished by multiple P Cygni absorption minima in the Balmer emission lines that correspond to outflow velocities of -400, -1100, and -1600 km/s. Multiple outflows have been observed in only a few other objects. In this paper we describe the evolution of the spectrum and the P Cygni profiles for three months past maximum, the post-maximum formation of a cool, dense wind, and the identification of a possible progenitor. One of the possible progenitors is an infrared source. Its pre-eruption spectral energy distribution suggests a bolometric luminosity of -8.3 mag and a dust temperature of 780 degrees K. If it is the progenitor it is above the AGB limit unlike the intermediate luminosity red transients. The three P Cygni profiles could be due to ejecta from the current eruption, the wind of the progenitor, or previous mass loss events. We suggest that they were all formed as part of the same high mass loss event and are due to material ejected at different velocities or energies. We also suggest that multiple outflows during giant eruptions may be more common than reported.
  • Recent supernova and transient surveys have revealed an increasing number of non-terminal stellar eruptions. Though the progenitor class of these eruptions includes the most luminous stars, little is known of the pre-supernova mechanics of massive stars in their most evolved state, thus motivating a census of possible progenitors. From surveys of evolved and unstable luminous star populations in nearby galaxies, we select a sample of yellow and red supergiant candidates in M31 and M33 for review of their spectral characteristics and spectral energy distributions. Since the position of intermediate and late-type supergiants on the color-magnitude diagram can be heavily contaminated by foreground dwarfs, we employ spectral classification and multi-band photometry from optical and near-infrared surveys to confirm membership. Based on spectroscopic evidence for mass loss and the presence of circumstellar dust in their SEDs, we find that $30-40\%$ of the yellow supergiants are likely in a post-red supergiant state. Comparison with evolutionary tracks shows that these mass-losing, post-RSGs have initial masses between $20-40\,M_{\odot}$. More than half of the observed red supergiants in M31 and M33 are producing dusty circumstellar ejecta. We also identify two new warm hypergiants in M31, J004621.05+421308.06 and J004051.59+403303.00, both of which are likely in a post-RSG state.
  • We present a follow-up study to the imaging polarimetry performed by Hayes et. al. 2011 on LAB1 in the SSA22 protocluster region. Arguably the most well-known Lyman-$\alpha$ "blob", this radio-quiet emission-line nebula likely hosts a galaxy which is either undergoing significant star formation or hosts an AGN, or both. We obtain deep, spatially resolved spectro-polarimetry of the Ly$\alpha$ emission and detect integrated linear polarization of $9$-$13\%\pm2$-$3\%$ at a distance of approximately 15 kpc north and south of the peak of the Lyman-$\alpha$ surface brightness with polarization vectors lying tangential to the galactic central source. In these same regions, we also detect a wavelength dependence in the polarization which is low at the center of the Ly$\alpha$ line profile and rises substantially in the wings of the profile. These polarization signatures are easily explained by a weak out-flowing shell model. The spectral dependence of the polarization presented here provide a framework for future observations and interpretations of the southern portion of LAB1 in that any model for this system must be able to reproduce this particular spectral dependence. However, questions still remain for the northern-most spur of LAB1. In this region we detect total linear polarization of between $3$ and $20\%$ at the $5\%$ significance level. Simulations predict that polarization should increase with radius for a symmetric geometry. That the northern spur does not suggests either that this region is not symmetric (which is likely) and exhibits variations in columns density, or that it is kinematically distinct from the rest of LAB1 and powered by another mechanism altogether.
  • We present 2 - 5 micron adaptive optics (AO) imaging and polarimetry of the famous hypergiant stars IRC +10420 and VY Canis Majoris. The imaging polarimetry of IRC +10420 with MMT-Pol at 2.2 micron resolves nebular emission with intrinsic polarization of 30%, with a high surface brightness indicating optically thick scattering. The relatively uniform distribution of this polarized emission both radially and azimuthally around the star confirms previous studies that place the scattering dust largely in the plane of the sky. Using constraints on scattered light consistent with the polarimetry at 2.2 micron, extrapolation to wavelengths in the 3 - 5 micron band predicts a scattered light component significantly below the nebular flux that is observed in our LBT/LMIRCam 3 - 5 micron AO imaging. Under the assumption this excess emission is thermal, we find a color temperature of ~ 500 K is required, well in excess of the emissivity-modified equilibrium temperature for typical astrophysical dust. The nebular features of VY CMa are found to be highly polarized (up to 60%) at 1.3 micron, again with optically thick scattering required to reproduce the observed surface brightness. This star's peculiar nebular feature dubbed the "Southwest Clump" is clearly detected in the 3.1 micron polarimetry as well, which, unlike IRC+10420, is consistent with scattered light alone. The high intrinsic polarizations of both hypergiants' nebulae are compatible with optically thick scattering for typical dust around evolved dusty stars, where the depolarizing effect of multiple scatters is mitigated by the grains' low albedos.
  • We present adaptive optics images of the extreme red supergiant VY Canis Majoris in the Ks, L' and M bands (2.15 to 4.8 micron) made with LMIRCam on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The peculiar "Southwest Clump" previously imaged from 1 to 2.2 micron appears prominently in all three filters. We find its brightness is due almost entirely to scattering, with the contribution of thermal emission limited to at most 25%. We model its brightness as optically thick scattering from silicate dust grains using typical size distributions. We find a lower limit mass for this single feature of 5E-03 Msun to 2.5E-02 Msun depending on the assumed gas-to-dust ratio. The presence of the Clump as a distinct feature with no apparent counterpart on the other side of the star is suggestive of an ejection event from a localized region of the star and is consistent with VY CMa's history of asymmetric high mass loss events.
  • SN2011ht has been described both as a true supernova and as an impostor. In this paper, we conclude that it does not match some basic expectations for a core-collapse event. We discuss SN2011ht's spectral evolution from a hot dense wind to a cool dense wind, followed by the post-plateau appearance of a faster low density wind during a rapid decline in luminosity. We identify a slow dense wind expanding at only 500--600 km/s, present throughout the eruption. A faster wind speed V ~ 900 km/s may be identified with a second phase of the outburst. There is no direct or significant evidence for any flow speed above 1000 km/s; the broad asymmetric wings of Balmer emission lines in the hot wind phase were due to Thomson scattering, not bulk motion. We estimate a mass loss rate of order 0.04 Msun/yr during the hot dense wind phase of the event. There is no evidence that the kinetic energy substantially exceeded the luminous energy, roughly 2 X 10^49 ergs; so the total energy was far less than a true SN. We suggest that SN2011ht was a giant eruption driven by super-Eddington radiation pressure, perhaps beginning about 6 months before the discovery. A strongly non-spherical SN might also account for the data, at the cost of more free parameters.
  • New visible and K-band polarization measurements on stars surrounding molecular clouds in Orion A and stars in the BN vicinity are presented. Our results confirm that magnetic fields located inside the Orion A molecular clouds and in their close neighborhood are spatially connected. On and around the BN object, we measured the angular offsets between the K-band polarization data and available submm data. We find high values of the polarization degree, P_{K}, and of the optical depth, \tau_{K}, close to an angular offset position of 90^{\circ} whereas lower values of P_{K} and \tau_{K} are observed for smaller angular offsets. We interpret these results as evidence for the presence of various magnetic field components toward lines of sight in the vicinity of BN. On a larger scale, we measured the distribution of angular offsets between available H-band polarization data and the same submm data set. Here we find an increase of <P_{H}> with angular offset which we interpret as a rotation of the magnetic field by \lesssim 60^{\circ}. This trend generalizes previous results on small scale toward and around lines of sight to BN and is consistent with a twist of the magnetic field on a larger scale towards OMC-1. A comparison of our results with several other studies suggests that a two-component magnetic field, maybe helical, could be wrapping the OMC-1 filament.
  • Images of the circumstellar ejecta associated with the post-red supergiant IRC +10420 show a complex ejecta with visual evidence for episodic mass loss. In this paper we describe the transverse motions of numerous knots, arcs and condensations in the inner ejecta measured from second epoch {\it HST/WFPC2} images. When combined with the radial motions for several of the features, the total space motion and direction of the outflows show that they were ejected at different times, in different directions, and presumably from separate regions on the surface of the star. These discrete structures in the ejecta are kinematically distinct from the general expansion of the nebula and their motions are dominated by their transverse velocities. They are apparently all moving within a few degrees of the plane of the sky. We are thus viewing IRC +10420 nearly pole-on and looking nearly directly down onto its equatorial plane. We also discuss the role of surface activity and magnetic fields on IRC +10420's recent mass loss history.
  • We study the performance of achromatic half-wave plates (AHWP) as a function of their construction parameters, the detection bandwidth of a power detector operating in the millimeter wave band, and the spectral shape of the incident radiation. We focus particular attention on the extraction of the degree of incident polarization and its orientation angle from the intensity measured as a function of AHWP rotation angle, which we call the IVA (intensity versus angle). We quantify the phase offset of the IVA and point to potential systematic errors in the extraction of this offset in cases where the incident spectrum is not sufficiently well known. We show how the phase offset and modulation efficiency of the AHWP depend on the relative angles between the plates in the stack and find that high modulation efficiency can be achieved with alignment accuracy of few degrees.
  • Images of the complex circumstellar nebula associated with the famous red supergiant VY CMa show evidence for multiple and asymmetric mass loss events over the past 1000 yrs. Doppler velocities of the arcs and knots in the ejecta showed that they are not only spatially distinct but also kinematically separate from the surrounding diffuse material. In this paper we describe second epoch HST/WFPC2 images to measure the transverse motions which when combined with the radial motions provide a complete picture of the kinematics of the ejecta including the total space motions and directions of the outflows. Our results show that the arcs and clumps of knots are moving at different velocities, in different directions, and at different angles relative to the plane of the sky and to the star, confirming their origin from eruptions at different times and from physically separate regions on the star. We conclude that the morphology and kinematics of the arcs and knots are consistent with a history of mass ejections not aligned with any presumed axis of symmetry. The arcs and clumps represent relatively massive outflows and ejections of gas very likely associated with large -- scale convective activity and magnetic fields.
  • Variable A in M33 is a member of a rare class of highly luminous, evolved stars near the upper luminosity boundary that show sudden and dramatic shifts in apparent temperature due to the formation of optically thick winds in high mass loss episodes. Recent optical and infrared spectroscopy and imaging reveal that its ``eruption'' begun in $\sim$1950 has ended, {\it lasting $\approx$ 45 yrs}. Our current observations show major changes in its wind from a cool, dense envelope to a much warmer state surrounded by low density gas with rare emission lines of Ca II, [Ca II] and K I. Its spectral energy distribution has unexpectedly changed, especially at the long wavelengths, with a significant decrease in its apparent flux, while the star remains optically obscured. We conclude that much of its radiation is now escaping out of our line of sight. We attribute this to the changing structure and distribution of its circumstellar ejecta corresponding to the altered state of its wind as the star recovers from a high mass loss event.
  • We present observations of the giant HII region complex N159 in the LMC using IRAC on the {\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. One of the two objects previously identified as protostars in N159 has an SED consistent with classification as a Class I young stellar object (YSO) and the other is probably a Class I YSO as well, making these two stars the youngest stars known outside the Milky Way. We identify two other sources that may also be Class I YSOs. One component, N159AN, is completely hidden at optical wavelengths, but is very prominent in the infrared. The integrated luminosity of the entire complex is L $\approx 9\times10^6$L$_{\odot}$, consistent with the observed radio emission assuming a normal Galactic initial mass function (IMF). There is no evidence for a red supergiant population indicative of an older burst of star formation. The N159 complex is 50 pc in diameter, larger in physical size than typical HII regions in the Milky Way with comparable luminosity. We argue that all of the individual components are related in their star formation history. The morphology of the region is consistent with a wind blown bubble $\approx 1-2Myr-old that has initiated star formation now taking place at the rim. Other than its large physical size, star formation in N159 appears to be indistinguishable from star formation in the Milky Way.
  • e present Near Infrared imaging polarimetry of three regions of massive star formation, G$192.16 - 3.82$, Cepheus A, and W42. In W42 we have discovered a new bipolar nebula located at the far side of the HII region behind the visible cluster of exciting stars. The axis of this new nebula is aligned with the magnetic field threading the entire cluster region. Polarization in the bipolar outflow nebulosity associated with G192.16 is consistent with a single illuminating source, too faint to be detected at $2 \micron$. Polarization in the reflection nebulosity associated with Ceph A requires more than one illuminating source, although HW2 is clearly dominant. In all three objects, the magnetic field in the outflow at distances greater than $\sim 0.2$ pc is radial. In G192.16 the magnetic field geometry closer than $\sim 0.2$ pc to the embedded star appears chaotic. For G192.16 the outflow is not aligned with the surrounding magnetic field, which lies in the galactic plane. In Ceph A, the outflow axis could be interpreted as being aligned with the galactic plane, but the magnetic field threading the region is not. Only in the case of W42 is the magnetic field threading the HII region aligned with the mean field in the surrounding galactic plane.
  • Interstellar polarization from aligned dust grains can be measured both in transmission at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and in emission at far-infrared and sub-mm wavelengths. These observations can help predict the behavior of foreground contamination of CMB polarimetry by dust in the Milky Way. Fractional polarization in emission from aligned dust grains will be at the higher range of currently observed values of 4-10%. Away from the galactic plane, fluctuations in Q and U will be dominated by fluctuations in intensity, and less influenced by fluctuations in fractional polarization and position angle.