• Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is often an effective solver for symmetric positive definite (SPD) linear systems resulting from the discretization of general elliptic PDEs, or the spatial discretization of parabolic PDEs. However, convergence theory and most variations of AMG rely on $A$ being SPD. Hyperbolic PDEs, which arise often in large-scale scientific simulations, remain a challenge for AMG, as well as other fast linear solvers, in part because the resulting linear systems are often highly nonsymmetric. Here, a novel convergence framework is developed for nonsymmetric, reduction-based AMG, and sufficient conditions derived for $\ell^2$-convergence of error and residual. In particular, classical multigrid approximation properties are connected with reduction-based measures to develop a robust framework for nonsymmetric, reduction-based AMG. Matrices with block-triangular structure are then recognized as being amenable to reduction-type algorithms, and a reduction-based AMG method is developed for upwind discretizations of hyperbolic PDEs, based on the concept of a Neumann approximation to ideal restriction ($n$AIR). $n$AIR can be seen as a variation of local AIR ($\ell$AIR) introduced in previous work, specifically targeting matrices with triangular structure. Although less versatile than $\ell$AIR, setup times for $n$AIR can be substantially faster for problems with high connectivity. $n$AIR is shown to be an effective and scalable solver of steady state transport for discontinuous, upwind discretizations, with unstructured meshes, and up to 6th-order finite elements, offering a significant improvement over existing AMG methods. $n$AIR is also shown to be effective on several classes of `nearly triangular' matrices, resulting from curvilinear finite elements and artificial diffusion.
  • Algebraic multigrid (AMG) solvers and preconditioners are some of the fastest numerical methods to solve linear systems, particularly in a parallel environment, scaling to hundreds of thousands of cores. Most AMG methods and theory assume a symmetric positive definite operator. This paper presents a new variation on classical AMG for nonsymmetric matrices (denoted lAIR), based on a local approximation to the ideal restriction operator, coupled with F-relaxation. A new block decomposition of the AMG error-propagation operator is used for a spectral analysis of convergence, and the efficacy of the algorithm is demonstrated on systems arising from the discrete form of the advection-diffusion-reaction equation. lAIR is shown to be a robust solver for various discretizations of the advection-diffusion-reaction equation, including time-dependent and steady-state, from purely advective to purely diffusive. Convergence is robust for discretizations on unstructured meshes and using higher-order finite elements, and is particularly effective on upwind discontinuous Galerkin discretizations. Although the implementation used here is not parallel, each part of the algorithm is highly parallelizable, avoiding common multigrid adjustments for strong advection such as line-relaxation and K- or W-cycles that can be effective in serial, but suffer from high communication costs in parallel, limiting their scalability.
  • This paper provides a unified and detailed presentation of root-node style algebraic multigrid (AMG). Algebraic multigrid is a popular and effective iterative method for solving large, sparse linear systems that arise from discretizing partial differential equations. However, while AMG is designed for symmetric positive definite matrices (SPD), certain SPD problems, such as anisotropic diffusion, are still not adequately addressed by existing methods. Non-SPD problems pose an even greater challenge, and in practice AMG is often not considered as a solver for such problems. The focus of this paper is on so-called root-node AMG, which can be viewed as a combination of classical and aggregation-based multigrid. An algorithm for root-node is outlined and a filtering strategy is developed, which is able to control the cost of using root-node AMG, particularly on difficult problems. New theoretical motivation is provided for root-node and energy-minimization as applied to symmetric as well non-symmetric systems. Numerical results are then presented demonstrating the robust ability of root-node to solve non-symmetric problems, systems-based problems, and difficult SPD problems, including strongly anisotropic diffusion, convection-diffusion, and upwind steady-state transport, in a scalable manner. New, detailed estimates of the computational cost of the setup and solve phase are given for each example, providing additional support for root-node AMG over alternative methods.