• During the last decade coarse-grained nucleotide models have emerged that allow us to DNA and RNA on unprecedented time and length scales. Among them is oxDNA, a coarse-grained, sequence-specific model that captures the hybridisation transition of DNA and many structural properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. oxDNA was previously only available as standalone software, but has now been implemented into the popular LAMMPS molecular dynamics code. This article describes the new implementation and analyses its parallel performance. Practical applications are presented that focus on single-stranded DNA, an area of research which has been so far under-investigated. The LAMMPS implementation of oxDNA lowers the entry barrier for using the oxDNA model significantly, facilitates future code development and interfacing with existing LAMMPS functionality as well as other coarse-grained and atomistic DNA models.
  • Inspired by recent successes using single-stranded DNA tiles to produce complex structures, we develop a two-step coarse-graining approach that uses detailed thermodynamic calculations with oxDNA, a nucleotide-based model of DNA, to parametrize a coarser kinetic model that can reach the time and length scales needed to study the assembly mechanisms of these structures. We test the model by performing a detailed study of the assembly pathways for a two-dimensional target structure made up of 334 unique strands each of which are 42 nucleotides long. Without adjustable parameters, the model reproduces a critical temperature for the formation of the assembly that is close to the temperature at which assembly first occurs in experiments. Furthermore, the model allows us to investigate in detail the nucleation barriers and the distribution of critical nucleus shapes for the assembly of a single target structure. The assembly intermediates are compact and highly connected (although not maximally so) and classical nucleation theory provides a good fit to the height and shape of the nucleation barrier at temperatures close to where assembly first occurs.
  • Improved understanding of molecular systems has only emphasised the sophistication of networks within the cell. Simultaneously, the advance of nucleic acid nanotechnology, a platform within which reactions can be exquisitely controlled, has made the development of artificial architectures and devices possible. Vital to this progress has been a solid foundation in the thermodynamics of molecular systems. In this pedagogical review and perspective, I will discuss how thermodynamics determines both the overall potential of molecular networks, and the minute details of design. I will then argue that, in turn, the need to understand molecular systems is helping to drive the development of theories of thermodynamics at the microscopic scale.
  • Retroactivity arises when the coupling of a molecular network $\mathcal{U}$ to a downstream network $\mathcal{D}$ results in signal propagation back from $\mathcal{D}$ to $\mathcal{U}$. The phenomenon represents a breakdown in modularity of biochemical circuits and hampers the rational design of complex functional networks. Considering simple models of signal-transduction architectures, we demonstrate the strong dependence of retroactivity on the properties of the upstream system, and explore the cost and efficacy of fuel-consuming insulating motifs that can mitigate retroactive effects. We find that simple insulating motifs can suppress retroactivity at a low fuel cost by coupling only weakly to the upstream system $\mathcal{U}$. However, this design approach reduces the signalling network's robustness to perturbations from leak reactions, and potentially compromises its ability to respond to rapidly-varying signals.
  • We introduce new Langevin-type equations describing the rotational and translational motion of rigid bodies interacting through conservative and non-conservative forces, and hydrodynamic coupling. In the absence of non-conservative forces the Langevin-type equations sample from the canonical ensemble. The rotational degrees of freedom are described using quaternions, the lengths of which are exactly preserved by the stochastic dynamics. For the proposed Langevin-type equations, we construct a weak 2nd order geometric integrator which preserves the main geometric features of the continuous dynamics. A number of numerical experiments are presented to illustrate both the new Langevin model and the numerical method for it.
  • We consider the technologically relevant costs of operating a reliable bit that can be erased rapidly. We find that both erasing and reliability times are non-monotonic in the underlying friction, leading to a trade-off between erasing speed and bit reliability. Fast erasure is possible at the expense of low reliability at moderate friction, and high reliability comes at the expense of slow erasure in the underdamped and overdamped limits. Within a given class of bit parameters and control strategies, we define "optimal" designs of bits that meet the desired reliability and erasing time requirements with the lowest operational work cost. We find that optimal designs always saturate the bound on the erasing time requirement, but can exceed the required reliability time if critically damped. The non-trivial geometry of the reliability and erasing time-scales allows us to exclude large regions of parameter space as sub-optimal. We find that optimal designs are either critically damped or close to critical damping under the erasing procedure.
  • How smart can a micron-sized bag of chemicals be? How can an artificial or real cell make inferences about its environment? From which kinds of probability distributions can chemical reaction networks sample? We begin tackling these questions by showing four ways in which a stochastic chemical reaction network can implement a Boltzmann machine, a stochastic neural network model that can generate a wide range of probability distributions and compute conditional probabilities. The resulting models, and the associated theorems, provide a road map for constructing chemical reaction networks that exploit their native stochasticity as a computational resource. Finally, to show the potential of our models, we simulate a chemical Boltzmann machine to classify and generate MNIST digits in-silico.
  • The learning rate is an information-theoretical quantity for bipartite Markov chains describing two coupled subsystems. It is defined as the rate at which transitions in the downstream subsystem tend to increase the mutual information between the two subsystems, and is bounded by the dissipation arising from these transitions. Its physical interpretation, however, is unclear, although it has been used as a metric for the sensing performance of the downstream subsystem. In this paper, we explore the behaviour of the learning rate for a number of simple model systems, establishing when and how its behaviour is distinct from the instantaneous mutual information between subsystems. In the simplest case, the two are almost equivalent. In more complex steady-state systems, the mutual information and the learning rate behave qualitatively distinctly, with the learning rate clearly now reflecting the rate at which the downstream system must update its information in response to changes in the upstream system. It is not clear whether this quantity is the most natural measure for sensor performance, and, indeed, we provide an example in which optimising the learning rate over a region of parameter space of the downstream system yields an apparently sub-optimal sensor.
  • Living cells use readout molecules to record the state of receptor proteins, similar to measurements or copies in typical computational devices. But is this analogy rigorous? Can cells be optimally efficient, and if not, why? We show that, as in computation, a canonical biochemical readout network generates correlations; extracting no work from these correlations sets a lower bound on dissipation. For general input, the biochemical network cannot reach this bound, even with arbitrarily slow reactions or weak thermodynamic driving. It faces an accuracy-dissipation trade-off that is qualitatively distinct from and worse than implied by the bound, and more complex steady-state copy processes cannot perform better. Nonetheless, the cost remains close to the thermodynamic bound unless accuracy is extremely high. Additionally, we show that biomolecular reactions could be used in thermodynamically optimal devices under exogenous manipulation of chemical fuels, suggesting an experimental system for testing computational thermodynamics.
  • Living cells use readout molecules to record the state of receptor proteins, similar to measurements or copies in typical computational devices. But is this analogy rigorous? Can cells be optimally efficient, and if not, why? We show that, as in computation, a canonical biochemical readout network generates correlations; extracting no work from these correlations sets a lower bound on dissipation. For general input, the biochemical network cannot reach this bound, even with arbitrarily slow reactions or weak thermodynamic driving. It faces an accuracy-dissipation trade-off that is qualitatively distinct from and worse than implied by the bound, and more complex steady-state copy processes cannot perform better. Nonetheless, the cost remains close to the thermodynamic bound unless accuracy is extremely high. Additionally, we show that biomolecular reactions could be used in thermodynamically optimal devices under exogenous manipulation of chemical fuels, suggesting an experimental system for testing computational thermodynamics.
  • The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic Molecular Dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P.G. Bolhuis and P.R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. {\bf 43}, 21: 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale BD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm we discuss its performance. The rotational BD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of e.g. protein signalling networks.
  • We propose a physically-realisable biochemical device that is coupled to a biochemical reservoir of mutual information, fuel molecules and a chemical bath. Mutual information allows work to be done on the bath even when the fuel molecules appear to be in equilibrium; alternatively, mutual information can be created by driving from the fuel or the bath. The system exhibits diverse behaviour, including a regime in which the information, despite increasing during the reaction, enhances the extracted work. We further demonstrate that a modified device can function without the need for external manipulation, eliminating the need for a complex and potentially costly control.
  • We present a modelling framework, and basic model parameterization, for the study of DNA origami folding at the level of DNA domains. Our approach is explicitly kinetic and does not assume a specific folding pathway. The binding of each staple is associated with a free-energy change that depends on staple sequence, the possibility of coaxial stacking with neighbouring domains, and the entropic cost of constraining the scaffold by inserting staple crossovers. A rigorous thermodynamic model is difficult to implement as a result of the complex, multiply connected geometry of the scaffold: we present a solution to this problem for planar origami. Coaxial stacking and entropic terms, particularly when loop closure exponents are taken to be larger than those for ideal chains, introduce interactions between staples. These cooperative interactions lead to the prediction of sharp assembly transitions with notable hysteresis that are consistent with experimental observations. We show that the model reproduces the experimentally observed consequences of reducing staple concentration, accelerated cooling and absent staples. We also present a simpler methodology that gives consistent results and can be used to study a wider range of systems including non-planar origami.
  • DNA bending is biologically important for genome regulation and is relevant to a range of nanotechnological systems. Recent results suggest that sharp bending is much easier than implied by the widely-used worm-like chain model; many of these studies, however, remain controversial. We use a coarse-grained model, previously fitted to DNA's basic thermodynamic and mechanical properties, to explore strongly bent systems. We find that as the end-to-end distance is decreased sufficiently short duplexes undergo a transition to a state in which the bending strain is localized at a flexible kink that involves disruption of base-pairing and stacking. This kinked state, which is not well-described by the worm-like chain model, allows the duplex to more easily be sharply bent. It is not completely flexible, however, due to constraints arising from the connectivity of both DNA backbones. We also perform a detailed comparison to recent experiments on a "molecular vice" that probes highly bent DNA. Close agreement between simulations and experiments strengthens the hypothesis that localised bending via kinking occurs in the molecular vice and causes enhanced flexibility of duplex DNA. Our calculations therefore suggests that the cost of kinking implied by this experiment is consistent with the known thermodynamic and mechanical properties of DNA.
  • DNA cyclization is a powerful technique to gain insight into the nature of DNA bending. The worm-like chain model provides a good description of small to moderate bending fluctuations, but some experiments on strongly-bent shorter molecules suggest enhanced flexibility over and above that expected from the worm-like chain. Here, we use a coarse-grained model of DNA to investigate the thermodynamics of DNA cyclization for molecules with less than 210 base pairs. As the molecules get shorter we find increasing deviations between our computed equilibrium j-factor and the worm-like chain predictions of Shimada and Yamakawa. These deviations are due to sharp kinking, first at nicks, and only subsequently in the body of the duplex. At the shortest lengths, substantial fraying at the ends of duplex domains is the dominant method of relaxation. We also estimate the dynamic j-factor measured in recent FRET experiments. We find that the dynamic j-factor is systematically larger than its equilibrium counterpart, with the deviation larger for shorter molecules, because not all the stress present in the fully cyclized state is present in the transition state. These observations are important for the interpretation of recent experiments, as only kinking within the body of the duplex is genuinely indicative of non-worm-like chain behaviour.
  • In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this noise extrinsic to the cell as much as possible. These networks, however, are also stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, and then how downstream signaling pathways integrate the noise in the receptor state; we will discuss how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time together set a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes of resources---receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy---and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade-off between accuracy and energetic cost.
  • We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of DNA designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves, and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures such as DNA origami which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na$^+$]=0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.
  • The rupture of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article we consider the shear-induced rupture of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that rupture must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to rupture a duplex within a given experiment depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to demonstrate that this approach naturally captures the experimentally observed dependence of the critical force on duplex length for a given observation time. In particular, the critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence of each additional base pair within the duplex is thermodynamically unfavorable rather than allowing for metastability, does not predict a time-scale-dependent critical force and does not naturally incorporate a critical force of zero for the shortest duplexes. Additionally, motivated by a recently proposed force sensor, we investigate application of stress to a duplex in a mixed mode that interpolates between shearing and unzipping. As with pure shearing, the critical force depends on the time scale of observation; at a fixed time scale and duplex length, the critical force exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on the fraction of the duplex that is subject to shearing.
  • Advances in DNA nanotechnology have stimulated the search for simple motifs that can be used to control the properties of DNA nanostructures. One such motif, which has been used extensively in structures such as polyhedral cages, two-dimensional arrays, and ribbons, is a bulged duplex, that is two helical segments that connect at a bulge loop. We use a coarse-grained model of DNA to characterize such bulged duplexes. We find that this motif can adopt structures belonging to two main classes: one where the stacking of the helices at the center of the system is preserved, the geometry is roughly straight and the bulge is on one side of the duplex, and the other where the stacking at the center is broken, thus allowing this junction to act as a hinge and increasing flexibility. Small loops favor states where stacking at the center of the duplex is preserved, with loop bases either flipped out or incorporated into the duplex. Duplexes with longer loops show more of a tendency to unstack at the bulge and adopt an open structure. The unstacking probability, however, is highest for loops of intermediate lengths, when the rigidity of single-stranded DNA is significant and the loop resists compression. The properties of this basic structural motif clearly correlate with the structural behavior of certain nano-scale objects, where the enhanced flexibility associated with larger bulges has been used to tune the self-assembly product as well as the detailed geometry of the resulting nanostructures.
  • We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5' end of the substrate and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds.
  • DNA nanotechnology promises to provide controllable self-assembly on the nanoscale, allowing for the design of static structures, dynamic machines and computational architectures. In this article I review the state-of-the art of DNA nanotechnology, highlighting the need for a more detailed understanding of the key processes, both in terms of theoretical modelling and experimental characterisation. I then consider coarse-grained models of DNA, mesoscale descriptions that have the potential to provide great insight into the operation of DNA nanotechnology if they are well designed. In particular, I discuss a number of nanotechnological systems that have been studied with oxDNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model, highlighting the subtle interplay of kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanical factors that can determine behaviour. Finally, new results highlighting the importance of mechanical tension in the operation of a two-footed walker are presented, demonstrating that recovery from an unintended `overstepped' configuration can be accelerated by three to four orders of magnitude by application of a moderate tension to the walker's track. More generally, the walker illustrates the possibility of biasing strand-displacement processes to affect the overall rate.
  • Double phosphorylation of protein kinases is a common feature of signalling cascades. This motif may reduce cross-talk between signalling pathways, as the second phosphorylation site allows for proofreading, especially when phosphorylation is distributive rather than processive. Recent studies suggest that phosphorylation can be `pseudo-processive' in the crowded cellular environment, as rebinding after the first phosphorylation is enhanced by slow diffusion. Here, we use a simple model with unsaturated reactants to show that specificity for one substrate over another drops as rebinding increases and pseudo-processive behavior becomes possible. However, this loss of specificity with increased rebinding is typically also observed if two distinct enzyme species are required for phosphorylation, i.e. when the system is necessarily distributive. Thus the loss of specificity is due to an intrinsic reduction in selectivity with increased rebinding, which benefits inefficient reactions, rather than pseudo-processivity itself. We also show that proofreading can remain effective when the intended signalling pathway exhibits high levels of rebinding-induced pseudo-processivity, unlike other proposed advantages of the dual phosphorylation motif.
  • We study the dynamics of DNA hairpin formation using oxDNA, a nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of DNA. In particular, we explore the effects of the loop stacking interactions and non-native base pairing on the hairpin closing times. We find a non-monotonic variation of the hairpin closing time with temperature, in agreement with the experimental work of Wallace et al. [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 2001, 98, 5584-5589]. The hairpin closing process involves the formation of an initial nucleus of one or two bonds between the stems followed by a rapid zippering of the stem. At high temperatures, typically above the hairpin melting temperature, an effective negative activation enthalpy is observed because the nucleus has a lower enthalpy than the open state. By contrast, at low temperatures, the activation enthalpy becomes positive mainly due to the increasing energetic cost of bending a loop that becomes increasingly highly stacked as the temperature decreases. We show that stacking must be very strong to induce this experimentally observed behavior, and that the existence of just a few weak stacking points along the loop can substantially suppress it. Non-native base pairs are observed to have only a small effect, slightly accelerating hairpin formation.
  • The effect of secondary structure on DNA duplex formation is poorly understood. We use a coarse-grained model of DNA to show that specific 3- and 4-base pair hairpins reduce hybridization rates by factors of 2 and 10 respectively, in good agreement with experiment. By contrast, melting rates are accelerated by factors of ~100 and ~2000. This surprisingly large speed-up occurs because hairpins form during the melting process, stabilizing partially melted states, and facilitating dissociation. These results may help guide the design of DNA devices that use hairpins to modulate hybridization and dissociation pathways and rates.
  • Biological information is not only stored in the digital chemical sequence of double helical DNA, but is also encoded in the mechanical properties of the DNA strands, which can influence biochemical processes involving its readout. For example, loop formation in the Lac operon can regulate the expression of key genes, and DNA supercoiling is closely correlated to rhythmic circardian gene expression in cyanobacteria. Supercoiling is also important for large scale organisation of the genome in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. DNA can respond to torsional stress by writhing to form looped structures called plectonemes, thus transferring energy stored as twist into energy stored in bending. Denaturation bubbles can also relax torsional stress, with the enthalpic cost of breaking bonds being compensated by their ability to absorb undertwist. Here we predict a novel regime where bubbles form at the tips of plectonemes, and study its properties using coarse-grained simulations. These tip bubbles can occur for both positive and negative supercoiling and greatly reduce plectoneme diffusion by a pinning mechanism. They can cause plectonemes to preferentially localise to AT rich regions, because bubbles more easily form there. The tip-bubble regime occurs for supercoiling densities and forces that are typically encountered for DNA in vivo, and may be exploited for biological control of genomic processes.