• This overview of neutrino astronomy emphasizes observation of astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube and interesting limits on Galactic neutrinos from IceCube and ANTARES.
  • The Monte Carlo model Sibyll has been designed for efficient simulation of hadronic multiparticle production up to the highest energies as needed for interpreting cosmic ray measurements. For more than 15 years, version 2.1 of Sibyll has been one of the standard models for air shower simulation. Motivated by data of LHC and fixed-target experiments and a better understanding of the phenomenology of hadronic interactions, we have developed an improved version of this model, version 2.3, which has been released in 2016. In this contribution we present a revised version of this model, called Sibyll 2.3c, that is further improved by adjusting particle production spectra to match the expectation of Feynman scaling in the fragmentation region. After a brief introduction to the changes implemented in Sibyll 2.3 and 2.3c with respect to Sibyll 2.1, the current predictions of the model for the depth of shower maximum, the number of muons at ground, and the energy spectrum of muons in extensive air showers are presented.
  • In view of the observation by IceCube of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, it is important to quantify the uncertainty in the background of atmospheric neutrinos. There are two sources of uncertainty, the imperfect knowledge of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic rays that produce the neutrinos and the limited understanding of hadron production, including charm, at high energy. This paper is an overview of both aspects.
  • IceCube, with its surface array IceTop, detects three different components of extensive air showers: the total signal at the surface, GeV muons in the periphery of the showers and TeV muons in the deep array of IceCube. The spectrum is measured with high resolution from the knee to the ankle with IceTop. Composition and spectrum are extracted from events seen in coincidence by the surface array and the deep array of IceCube. The muon lateral distribution at the surface is obtained from the data and used to provide a measurement of the muon density at 600 meters from the shower core up to 30 PeV. Results are compared to measurements from other experiments to obtain an overview of the spectrum and composition over an extended range of energy. Consistency of the surface muon measurements with hadronic interaction models and with measurements at higher energy is discussed.
  • This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric $\nu_\mu$ and $\nu_e$ are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the $\nu_\mu/\bar{\nu}_\mu$ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.
  • The event generator Sibyll can be used for the simulation of hadronic multiparticle production up to the highest cosmic ray energies. It is optimized for providing an economic description of those aspects of the expected hadronic final states that are needed for the calculation of air showers and atmospheric lepton fluxes. New measurements from fixed target and collider experiments, in particular those at LHC, allow us to test the predictive power of the model version 2.1, which was released more than 10 years ago, and also to identify shortcomings. Based on a detailed comparison of the model predictions with the new data we revisit model assumptions and approximations to obtain an improved version of the interaction model. In addition a phenomenological model for the production of charm particles is implemented as needed for the calculation of prompt lepton fluxes in the energy range of the astrophysical neutrinos recently discovered by IceCube. After giving an overview of the new ideas implemented in Sibyll and discussing how they lead to an improved description of accelerator data, predictions for air showers and atmospheric lepton fluxes are presented.
  • IceCube has observed neutrinos above 100 TeV at a level significantly above the steeply falling background of atmospheric neutrinos. The astrophysical signal is seen both in the high-energy starting event analysis from the whole sky and as a high-energy excess in the signal of neutrino-induced muons from below. No individual neutrino source, either steady or transient, has yet been identified. Several follow-up efforts are currently in place in an effort to find coincidences with sources observed by optical, X-ray and gamma-ray detectors. This paper, presented at the inauguration of HAWC, reviews the main results of IceCube and describes the status of plans to move to near-real time publication of high-energy events by IceCube.
  • An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.
  • SIBYLL 2.1 is an event generator for hadron interactions at the highest energies. It is commonly used to analyze and interpret extensive air shower measurements. In light of the first detection of PeV neutrinos by the IceCube collaboration the inclusive fluxes of muons and neutrinos in the atmosphere have become very important. Predicting these fluxes requires understanding of the hadronic production of charmed particles since these contribute significantly to the fluxes at high energy through their prompt decay. We will present an updated version of SIBYLL that has been tuned to describe LHC data and extended to include the production of charmed hadrons.
  • Atmospheric neutrinos are an important background to astrophysical neutrino searches, and are also of considerable interest in their own right. This paper points out that the contribution to conventional atmospheric $\nu_e$ of the rare semileptonic decay of $K_S$ becomes significant at high energy. Although the $K_S\rightarrow \pi e\nu$ branching ratio is very small, the short $K_S$ lifetime leads to a high critical energy, so that, for vertical showers, the inclusion of $K_S$ semileptonic decay increases the conventional $\nu_e$ flux by $\approx 30%$ at energies above 100 TeV. In this paper, we present calculations of the flux of $\nu_e$ from $K_S$. At energies above their critical energies, the $\nu_e$ fluxes from kaon decay may be simply related to the kaon semileptonic widths; this leads to a near-equality between the flux of $\nu_e$ from $K^+$, $K_L$ and $K_S$.
  • Neutrino telescopes such as IceCube search for an excess of high energy neutrinos above the steeply falling atmospheric background as one approach to finding extraterrestrial neutrinos. For samples of events selected to start in the detector, the atmospheric background can be reduced to the extent that a neutrino interaction inside the fiducial volume is accompanied by a detectable muon from the same cosmic-ray cascade in which the neutrino was produced. Here we provide an approximate calculation of the veto probability as a function of neutrino energy and zenith angle.
  • This review focuses on high-energy cosmic rays in the PeV energy range and above. Of particular interest is the knee of the spectrum around 3 PeV and the transition from cosmic rays of Galactic origin to particles from extra-galactic sources. Our goal is to establish a baseline spectrum from 10^14 to 10^20 eV by combining the results of many measurements at different energies. In combination with measurements of the nuclear composition of the primaries, the shape of the energy spectrum places constraints on the number and spectra of sources that may contribute to the observed spectrum.
  • The flux of high-energy (>GeV) neutrinos consists primarily of those produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. The contribution from extraterrestrial sources is still unknown. Current limits suggest that the observed spectrum is dominated by atmospheric neutrinos up to at least 100 TeV. The contribution of charmed hadrons to the flux of atmospheric neutrinos is important in the context of the search for astrophysical neutrinos because the spectrum of such "prompt" neutrinos is harder than that of "conventional" neutrinos from decay of pions and kaons. The prompt component therefore becomes increasingly important as energy increases. This paper reviews the status of the search for prompt muons and neutrinos with emphasis on the complementary aspects of muons, electron neutrinos and muon neutrinos.
  • Interpretation of measurements of the muon charge ratio in the TeV range depends on the spectra of protons and neutrons in the primary cosmic radiation and on the inclusive cross sections for production of $\pi^\pm$ and $K^\pm$ in the atmosphere. Recent measurements of the spectra of cosmic-ray nuclei are used here to estimate separately the energy spectra of protons and neutrons and hence to calculate the charge separated hadronic cascade in the atmosphere. From the corresponding production spectra of $\mu^+$ and $\mu^-$ the $\mu^+/\mu^-$ ratio is calculated and compared to recent measurements. The comparison leads to a determination of the relative contribution of kaons and pions. Implications for the spectra of $\nu_\mu$ and $\bar{\nu}_\mu$ are discussed.
  • In this paper we review the status of the search for high-energy neutrinos from outside the solar system and discuss the implications for the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. Connections between neutrinos and gamma-rays are also discussed.
  • This paper reviews the status of the search for high-energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Results from large neutrino telescopes in water (Antares, Baikal) and ice (IceCube) are discussed as well as observations from the surface with Auger and from high altitude with ANITA. Comments on IceTop, the surface component of IceCube are also included.
  • This paper is a brief review of the status of the search for astrophysical neutrinos of high energy. Its emphasis is on the search for a hard spectrum of neutrinos from the whole Northern sky above the steeply falling background of atmospheric neutrinos. Current limits are so low that they are beginning to constrain models of the origin of extragalactic cosmic rays. Systematic effects stemming from incomplete knowledge of the background of atmospheric neutrinos are discussed.
  • This talk describes the complete IceCube neutrino telescope and summarizes some results obtained while the detector was under construction.
  • IceCube as a three-dimensional air-shower array covers an energy range of the cosmic-ray spectrum from below 1 PeV to approximately 1 EeV. This talk is a brief review of the function and goals of IceTop, the surface component of the IceCube neutrino telescope. An overview of different and complementary ways that IceCube is sensitive to the primary cosmic-ray composition up to the EeV range is presented. Plans to obtain composition information in the threshold region of the detector in order to overlap with direct measurements of the primary composition in the 100-300 TeV range are also described.
  • The cosmic ray interaction event generator Sibyll is widely used in extensive air shower simulations for cosmic ray and neutrino experiments. Charmed particle production has been added to the Monte Carlo with a phenomenological, non-perturbative model that properly accounts for charm production in the forward direction. As prompt decays of charm can become a significant background for neutrino detection, proper simulation of charmed particles is very important. We compare charmed meson and baryon production to accelerator data.
  • The ISVHECRI conference series emphasizes the connection between high energy physics and cosmic ray physics--the study of elementary particles and nuclei from accelerators in the lab and from space. In this introductory paper on cosmic rays, I comment on several current topics in the field while also providing some historical context.
  • The intensity of TeV atmospheric muons and neutrinos depends on the temperature in the stratosphere. We show that the energy-dependence in the 100 TeV range of the correlation with temperature is sensitive to the fraction of muons and neutrinos from decay of charmed hadrons. We discuss the prospects for using the temperature effect as observed in gigaton neutrino detectors to measure the charm contribution.
  • Using the atmospheric neutrinos to probe the density profile of the Earth depends on knowing the angular distribution of the neutrinos at production and the neutrino cross section. This paper reviews the essential features of the angular distribution with emphasis on the relative contributions of pions, kaons and charm.
  • The cosmic ray interaction event generator Sibyll is widely used in extensive air shower simulations. We describe in detail the properties of Sibyll 2.1 and the differences with the original version 1.7. The major structural improvements are the possibility to have multiple soft interactions, introduction of new parton density functions, and an improved treatment of diffraction. Sibyll 2.1 gives better agreement with fixed target and collider data, especially for the inelastic cross sections and multiplicities of secondary particles. Shortcomings and suggestions for future improvements are also discussed.
  • This paper gives an overview of the scientific goals of IceCube with an emphasis on the importance of atmospheric neutrinos. Status and schedule for completing the detector are presented.