• C/2002 CE$_{10}$ is an object in a retrograde elliptical orbit with Tisserand parameter $-0.853$ indicating a likely origin in the Oort Cloud. It appears to be a rather inactive comet since no coma and only a very weak tail was detected during the past perihelion passage. We present multi-color optical photometry, lightcurve and thermal mid-IR observations of the asteroidal comet. \textcolor{blue}{ With the photometric analysis in $BVRI$, the surface color is found to be redder than asteroids, corresponding to cometary nuclei and TNOs/Centaurs. The time-resolved differential photometry supports a rotation period of 8.19$\pm$0.05 h. The effective diameter and the geometric albedo are 17.9$\pm$0.9 km and 0.03$\pm$0.01, respectively, indicating a very dark reflectance of the surface. The dark and redder surface color of C/2002 CE$_{10}$ may be attribute to devolatilized material by surface aging suffered from the irradiation by cosmic rays or from impact by dust particles in the Oort Cloud. Alternatively, C/2002 CE$_{10}$ was formed of very dark refractory material originally like a rocky planetesimal. In both cases, this object lacks ices (on the surface at least). The dynamical and known physical characteristics of C/2002 CE$_{10}$ are best compatible with those of the Damocloids population in the Solar System, that appear to be exhaust cometary nucleus in Halley-type orbits. The study of physical properties of rocky Oort cloud objects may give us a key for the formation of the Oort cloud and the solar system.
  • A theorem of Dolfi, Herzog, Kaplan, and Lev \cite[Thm.~C]{DHKL} asserts that in a finite group with trivial Fitting subgroup, the size of the soluble residual of the group is bounded from below by a certain power of the group order, and that the inequality is sharp. Inspired by this result and some of the arguments in \cite{DHKL}, we establish the following generalisation: if $\mathfrak{X}$ is a subgroup-closed Fitting formation of full characteristic which does not contain all finite groups and $\overline{\mathfrak{X}}$ is the extension-closure of $\mathfrak{X}$, then there exists an (optimal) constant $\gamma$ depending only on $\mathfrak{X}$ such that, for all non-trivial finite groups $G$ with trivial $\mathfrak{X}$-radical, \begin{equation} \left\lvert G^{\overline{\mathfrak{X}}}\right\rvert \,>\, \vert G\vert^\gamma, \end{equation} where $G^{\overline{\mathfrak{X}}}$ is the ${\overline{\mathfrak{X}}}$-residual of $G$. When $\mathfrak{X} = \mathfrak{N}$, the class of finite nilpotent groups, it follows that $\overline{\mathfrak{X}} = \mathfrak{S}$, the class of finite soluble groups, thus we recover the original theorem of Dolfi, Herzog, Kaplan, and Lev. In the last section of our paper, building on J.\,G. Thompson's classification of minimal simple groups, we exhibit a family of subgroup-closed Fitting formations $\mathfrak{X}$ of full characteristic such that $\mathfrak{S} \subset \overline{\mathfrak{X}} \subset \mathfrak{E}$, thus providing applications of our main result beyond the reach of \cite[Thm.~C]{DHKL}.
  • The aim of the Asteroid Science Intersections with In-Space Mine Engineering (ASIME) 2016 conference on September 21-22, 2016 in Luxembourg City was to provide an environment for the detailed discussion of the specific properties of asteroids, with the engineering needs of space missions that utilize asteroids. The ASIME 2016 Conference produced a layered record of discussions from the asteroid scientists and the asteroid miners to understand each other's key concerns and to address key scientific questions from the asteroid mining companies: Planetary Resources, Deep Space Industries and TransAstra. These Questions were the focus of the two day conference, were addressed by scientists inside and outside of the ASIME Conference and are the focus of this White Paper. The Questions from the asteroid mining companies have been sorted into the three asteroid science themes: 1) survey, 2) surface and 3) subsurface and 4) Other. The answers to those Questions have been provided by the scientists with their conference presentations or edited directly into an early open-access collaborative Google document (August 2016-October 2016), or inserted by A. Graps using additional reference materials. During the ASIME 2016 last two-hours, the scientists turned the Questions from the Asteroid Miners around by presenting their own key concerns: Questions from the Asteroid Scientists . These answers in this White Paper will point to the Science Knowledge Gaps (SKGs) for advancing the asteroid in-space resource utilisation domain.
  • The advent of microcomputers in the 1970s has dramatically changed our society. Since then, microprocessors have been made almost exclusively from silicon, but the ever-increasing demand for higher integration density and speed, lower power consumption and better integrability with everyday goods has prompted the search for alternatives. Germanium and III-V compound semiconductors are being considered promising candidates for future high-performance processor generations and chips based on thin-film plastic technology or carbon nanotubes could allow for embedding electronic intelligence into arbitrary objects for the Internet-of-Things. Here, we present a 1-bit implementation of a microprocessor using a two-dimensional semiconductor - molybdenum disulfide. The device can execute user-defined programs stored in an external memory, perform logical operations and communicate with its periphery. Importantly, our 1-bit design is readily scalable to multi-bit data. The device consists of 115 transistors and constitutes the most complex circuitry so far made from a two-dimensional material.
  • With its electrically tunable light absorption and ultrafast photoresponse, graphene is a promising candidate for high-speed chip-integrated photonics. The generation mechanisms of photosignals in graphene photodetectors have been studied extensively in the past years. However, the knowledge about efficient light conversion at graphene pn-junctions has not yet been translated into high-performance devices. Here, we present a graphene photodetector integrated on a silicon slot-waveguide, acting as a dual-gate to create a pn-junction in the optical absorption region of the device. While at zero bias the photo-thermoelectric effect is the dominant conversion process, an additional photoconductive contribution is identified in a biased configuration. Extrinsic responsivities of 35 mA/W, or 3.5 V/W, at zero bias and 76 mA/W at 300 mV bias voltage are achieved. The device exhibits a 3 dB-bandwidth of 65 GHz, which is the highest value reported for a graphene-based photodetector.
  • Recently, black phosphorus (BP) has joined the two dimensional material family as a promising candidate for photonic applications, due to its moderate bandgap, high carrier mobility, and compatibility with a diverse range of substrates. Photodetectors are probably the most explored BP photonic devices, however, their unique potential compared with other layered materials in the mid-infrared wavelength range has not been revealed. Here, we demonstrate BP mid infrared detectors at 3.39 um with high internal gain, resulting in an external responsivity of 82 A/W. Noise measurements show that such BP photodetectors are capable of sensing low intensity mid-infrared light in the picowatt range. Moreover, the high photoresponse remains effective at kilohertz modulation frequencies, because of the fast carrier dynamics arising from BPs moderate bandgap. The high photoresponse at mid infrared wavelengths and the large dynamic bandwidth, together with its unique polarization dependent response induced by low crystalline symmetry, can be coalesced to promise photonic applications such as chip-scale mid-infrared sensing and imaging at low light levels.
  • Fengpeng An, Guangpeng An, Qi An, Vito Antonelli, Eric Baussan, John Beacom, Leonid Bezrukov, Simon Blyth, Riccardo Brugnera, Margherita Buizza Avanzini, Jose Busto, Anatael Cabrera, Hao Cai, Xiao Cai, Antonio Cammi, Guofu Cao, Jun Cao, Yun Chang, Shaomin Chen, Shenjian Chen, Yixue Chen, Davide Chiesa, Massimiliano Clemenza, Barbara Clerbaux, Janet Conrad, Davide D'Angelo, Herve De Kerret, Zhi Deng, Ziyan Deng, Yayun Ding, Zelimir Djurcic, Damien Dornic, Marcos Dracos, Olivier Drapier, Stefano Dusini, Stephen Dye, Timo Enqvist, Donghua Fan, Jian Fang, Laurent Favart, Richard Ford, Marianne Goger-Neff, Haonan Gan, Alberto Garfagnini, Marco Giammarchi, Maxim Gonchar, Guanghua Gong, Hui Gong, Michel Gonin, Marco Grassi, Christian Grewing, Mengyun Guan, Vic Guarino, Gang Guo, Wanlei Guo, Xin-Heng Guo, Caren Hagner, Ran Han, Miao He, Yuekun Heng, Yee Hsiung, Jun Hu, Shouyang Hu, Tao Hu, Hanxiong Huang, Xingtao Huang, Lei Huo, Ara Ioannisian, Manfred Jeitler, Xiangdong Ji, Xiaoshan Jiang, Cecile Jollet, Li Kang, Michael Karagounis, Narine Kazarian, Zinovy Krumshteyn, Andre Kruth, Pasi Kuusiniemi, Tobias Lachenmaier, Rupert Leitner, Chao Li, Jiaxing Li, Weidong Li, Weiguo Li, Xiaomei Li, Xiaonan Li, Yi Li, Yufeng Li, Zhi-Bing Li, Hao Liang, Guey-Lin Lin, Tao Lin, Yen-Hsun Lin, Jiajie Ling, Ivano Lippi, Dawei Liu, Hongbang Liu, Hu Liu, Jianglai Liu, Jianli Liu, Jinchang Liu, Qian Liu, Shubin Liu, Shulin Liu, Paolo Lombardi, Yongbing Long, Haoqi Lu, Jiashu Lu, Jingbin Lu, Junguang Lu, Bayarto Lubsandorzhiev, Livia Ludhova, Shu Luo, Vladimir Lyashuk, Randolph Mollenberg, Xubo Ma, Fabio Mantovani, Yajun Mao, Stefano M. Mari, William F. McDonough, Guang Meng, Anselmo Meregaglia, Emanuela Meroni, Mauro Mezzetto, Lino Miramonti, Thomas Mueller, Dmitry Naumov, Lothar Oberauer, Juan Pedro Ochoa-Ricoux, Alexander Olshevskiy, Fausto Ortica, Alessandro Paoloni, Haiping Peng, Jen-Chieh Peng, Ezio Previtali, Ming Qi, Sen Qian, Xin Qian, Yongzhong Qian, Zhonghua Qin, Georg Raffelt, Gioacchino Ranucci, Barbara Ricci, Markus Robens, Aldo Romani, Xiangdong Ruan, Xichao Ruan, Giuseppe Salamanna, Mike Shaevitz, Valery Sinev, Chiara Sirignano, Monica Sisti, Oleg Smirnov, Michael Soiron, Achim Stahl, Luca Stanco, Jochen Steinmann, Xilei Sun, Yongjie Sun, Dmitriy Taichenachev, Jian Tang, Igor Tkachev, Wladyslaw Trzaska, Stefan van Waasen, Cristina Volpe, Vit Vorobel, Lucia Votano, Chung-Hsiang Wang, Guoli Wang, Hao Wang, Meng Wang, Ruiguang Wang, Siguang Wang, Wei Wang, Yi Wang, Yi Wang, Yifang Wang, Zhe Wang, Zheng Wang, Zhigang Wang, Zhimin Wang, Wei Wei, Liangjian Wen, Christopher Wiebusch, Bjorn Wonsak, Qun Wu, Claudia-Elisabeth Wulz, Michael Wurm, Yufei Xi, Dongmei Xia, Yuguang Xie, Zhi-zhong Xing, Jilei Xu, Baojun Yan, Changgen Yang, Chaowen Yang, Guang Yang, Lei Yang, Yifan Yang, Yu Yao, Ugur Yegin, Frederic Yermia, Zhengyun You, Boxiang Yu, Chunxu Yu, Zeyuan Yu, Sandra Zavatarelli, Liang Zhan, Chao Zhang, Hong-Hao Zhang, Jiawen Zhang, Jingbo Zhang, Qingmin Zhang, Yu-Mei Zhang, Zhenyu Zhang, Zhenghua Zhao, Yangheng Zheng, Weili Zhong, Guorong Zhou, Jing Zhou, Li Zhou, Rong Zhou, Shun Zhou, Wenxiong Zhou, Xiang Zhou, Yeling Zhou, Yufeng Zhou, Jiaheng Zou
    Oct. 18, 2015 hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\%. Neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at 10 kpc would lead to ~5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ~2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton elastic scattering events in JUNO. Detection of DSNB would provide valuable information on the cosmic star-formation rate and the average core-collapsed neutrino energy spectrum. Geo-neutrinos can be detected in JUNO with a rate of ~400 events per year, significantly improving the statistics of existing geoneutrino samples. The JUNO detector is sensitive to several exotic searches, e.g. proton decay via the $p\to K^++\bar\nu$ decay channel. The JUNO detector will provide a unique facility to address many outstanding crucial questions in particle and astrophysics. It holds the great potential for further advancing our quest to understanding the fundamental properties of neutrinos, one of the building blocks of our Universe.
  • We report the growth of YFe2O4-\delta\ single crystals by the optical floating zone method, showing for the first time the same magnetization as highly stoichiometric (\delta = 0.00) powder samples and sharp superstructure reflections in single crystal x-ray diffraction. The latter can be attributed to three dimensional long-range charge ordering. Resonant x-ray diffraction at the Fe K-edge with full linear polarization analysis was used for the investigation of the possibility of orbital order.
  • We investigate the light propagation by means of simulations of wavefronts and light cones for Kerr spacetimes. Simulations of this kind give us a new insight to better understand the light propagation in presence of massive rotating black holes. A relevant result is that wavefronts are back scattered with winding around the black hole. To generate these visualizations, an interactive computer program with a graphical user interface, called JWFront, was written in Java.
  • Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as promising candidates for sensitive photodetection. Here, we report a photoconductivity study of biased mono- and bilayer molybdenum disulfide field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photogain. The photovoltaic effect is described as a shift in transistor threshold voltage due to charge transfer from the channel to nearby molecules, including SiO2 surface-bound water. The photoconductive effect is attributed to the trapping of carriers in band tail states in the molybdenum disulfide itself. A simple model is presented that reproduces our experimental observations, such as the dependence on incident optical power and gate voltage. Our findings offer design and engineering strategies for atomically thin molybdenum disulfide photodetectors, and we anticipate that the results are generalizable to other transition metal dichalcogenides as well.
  • We analyze albedo data obtained using the Herschel Space Observatory that reveal the existence of two distinct types of surface among midsized transneptunian objects. A color-albedo diagram shows two large clusters of objects, one redder and higher albedo and another darker and more neutrally colored. Crucially, all objects in our sample located in dynamically stable orbits within the classical Kuiper belt region and beyond are confined to the bright-red group, implying a compositional link. Those objects are believed to have formed further from the Sun than the dark-neutral bodies. This color-albedo separation is evidence for a compositional discontinuity in the young solar system.
  • Semiconductor heterostructures form the cornerstone of many electronic and optoelectronic devices and are traditionally fabricated using epitaxial growth techniques. More recently, heterostructures have also been obtained by vertical stacking of two-dimensional crystals, such as graphene and related two- dimensional materials. These layered designer materials are held together by van der Waals forces and contain atomically sharp interfaces. Here, we report on a type- II van der Waals heterojunction made of molybdenum disulfide and tungsten diselenide monolayers. The junction is electrically tunable and under appropriate gate bias, an atomically thin diode is realized. Upon optical illumination, charge transfer occurs across the planar interface and the device exhibits a photovoltaic effect. Advances in large-scale production of two-dimensional crystals could thus lead to a new photovoltaic solar technology.
  • Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), are currently receiving a lot of attention. They are crystalline, and thus of high material quality, even so, they can be produced in large areas and are bendable, thus providing opportunities for novel applications. Here, we report a truly 2D p-n junction diode, based on an electrostatically doped tungsten diselenide (WSe2) monolayer. As p-n diodes are the basic building block in a wide variety of optoelectronic devices, our demonstration constitutes an important advance towards 2D optoelectronics. We present applications as (i) photovoltaic solar cell, (ii) photodiode, and (iii) light emitting diode. Light power conversion and electroluminescence efficiencies are ca. 0.5 % and 0.1 %, respectively. Given the recent advances in large-scale production of 2D crystals, we expect them to profoundly impact future developments in solar, lighting, and display technologies.
  • Optical interconnects are becoming attractive alternatives to electrical wiring in intra- and inter-chip communication links. Particularly, the integration with silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology has received considerable interest due to the ability of cost-effective integration of electronics and optics on a single chip. While silicon enables the realization of optical waveguides and passive components, the integration of another, optically absorbing, material is required for photodetection. Germanium or compound semiconductors are traditionally used for this purpose; their integration with silicon technology, however, faces major challenges. Recently, graphene has emerged as a viable alternative for optoelectronic applications, including photodetection. Here, we demonstrate an ultra-wideband CMOS-compatible photodetector based on graphene. We achieve multi-gigahertz operation over all fiber-optic telecommunication bands, beyond the wavelength range of strained germanium photodetectors, whose responsivity is limited by their bandgap. Our work complements the recent demonstration of a CMOS-integrated graphene electro-optical modulator, paving the way for carbon-based optical interconnects.
  • We investigate the relationship between communication and search efficiency in a biological context by proposing a model of Brownian searchers with long-range pairwise interaction. After a general study of the properties of the model, we show an application to the particular case of acoustic communication among Mongolian gazelle, for which data are available, searching for good habitat areas. Using Monte Carlo simulations and density equations, our results point out that the search is optimal (i.e. the mean first hitting time among searchers is minimum) at intermediate scales of communication, showing that both an excess and a lack of information may worsen it.
  • A thorough understanding of the energy dissipation in the dynamics of wet granular matter is essential for a continuum description of natural phenomena such as debris flow, and the development of various industrial applications such as the granulation process. The coefficient of restitution (COR), defined as the ratio between the relative rebound and impact velocities of a binary impact, is frequently used to characterize the amount of energy dissipation associated. We measure the COR by tracing a freely falling sphere bouncing on a wet surface with the liquid film thickness monitored optically. For fixed ratio between the film thickness and the particle size, the dependence of the COR on the impact velocity and various properties of the liquid film can be characterized with the Stokes number, defined as the ratio between the inertia of the particle and the viscosity of the liquid. Moreover, the COR for infinitely large impact velocities derived from the scaling can be analyzed by a model considering the energy dissipation from the inertia of the liquid film.
  • The monolithic integration of novel nanomaterials with mature and established technologies has considerably widened the scope and potential of nanophotonics. For example, the integration of single semiconductor quantum dots into photonic crystals has enabled highly efficient single-photon sources. Recently, there has also been an increasing interest in using graphene - a single atomic layer of carbon - for optoelectronic devices. However, being an inherently weak optical absorber (only 2.3 % absorption), graphene has to be incorporated into a high-performance optical resonator or waveguide to increase the absorption and take full advantage of its unique optical properties. Here, we demonstrate that by monolithically integrating graphene with a Fabry-Perot microcavity, the optical absorption is 26-fold enhanced, reaching values >60 %. We present a graphene-based microcavity photodetector with record responsivity of 21 mA/W. Our approach can be applied to a variety of other graphene devices, such as electro-absorption modulators, variable optical attenuators, or light emitters, and provides a new route to graphene photonics with the potential for applications in communications, security, sensing and spectroscopy.
  • Graphene-based photodetectors are promising new devices for high-speed optoelectronic applications. However, despite recent efforts, it is not clear what determines the ultimate speed limit of these devices. Here, we present measurements of the intrinsic response time of metal-graphene-metal photodetectors with monolayer graphene using an optical correlation technique with ultrashort laser pulses. We obtain a response time of 2.1 ps that is mainly given by the short lifetime of the photogenerated carriers. This time translates into a bandwidth of ~262 GHz. Moreover, we investigate the dependence of the response time on gate voltage and illumination laser power.
  • The Catalogue of Spacetimes is a collection of four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes in the context of the General Theory of Relativity (GR). The aim of the catalogue is to give a quick reference for students who need some basic facts of the most well-known spacetimes in GR.
  • While silicon has dominated solid-state electronics for more than four decades, a variety of new materials have been introduced into photonics to expand the accessible wavelength range and to improve the performance of photonic devices. For example, gallium-nitride based materials enable the light emission at blue and ultraviolet wavelengths, and high index contrast silicon-on-insulator facilitates the realization of ultra dense and CMOS compatible photonic devices. Here, we report the first deployment of graphene, a two-dimensional carbon material, as the photo-detection element in a 10 Gbits/s optical data link. In this interdigitated metal-graphene-metal photodetector, an asymmetric metallization scheme is adopted to break the mirror symmetry of the built-in electric-field profile in conventional graphene field-effect-transistor channels, allowing for efficient photo-detection within the entire area of light illumination. A maximum external photo-responsivity of 6.1 mA/W is achieved at 1.55 {\mu}m wavelength, a very impressive value given that the material is below one nanometer in thickness. Moreover, owing to the unique band structure and exceptional electronic properties of graphene, high speed photodetectors with an ultra-wide operational wavelength range at least from 300 nm to 6 {\mu}m can be realized using this fascinating material.
  • Electrically-driven light emission from carbon nanotubes could be exploited in nano-scale lasers and single-photon sources, and has therefore been the focus of much research. However, to date, high electric fields and currents have been either required for electroluminescence, or have been an undesired side effect, leading to high power requirements and low efficiencies. In addition, electroluminescent linewidths have been broad enough to obscure the contributions of individual optical transitions. Here, we report electrically-induced light emission from individual carbon nanotube p-n diodes. A new level of control over electrical carrier injection is achieved, reducing power dissipation by a factor of up to 1000, and resulting in zero threshold current, negligible self-heating, and high carrier-to- photon conversion efficiencies. Moreover, the electroluminescent spectra are significantly narrower (ca. 35 meV) than in previous studies, allowing the identification of emission from free and localized excitons.
  • We measure the channel potential of a graphene transistor using a scanning photocurrent imaging technique. We show that at a certain gate bias, the impact of the metal on the channel potential profile extends into the channel for more than 1/3 of the total channel length from both source and drain sides, hence most of the channel is affected by the metal. The potential barrier between the metal controlled graphene and bulk graphene channel is also measured at various gate biases. As the gate bias exceeds the Dirac point voltage, VDirac, the original p-type graphene channel turns into a p-n-p channel. When light is focused on the p-n junctions, an impressive external responsivity of 0.001 A/W is achieved, given that only a single layer of atoms are involved in photon detection.
  • The electronic properties of graphene are unique and are attracting increased attention to this novel 2-dimensional system. Its photonic properties are not less impressive. For example, this single atomic layer absorbs through direct interband transitions a considerable fraction of the light (~2.3%) over a very a broad wavelength range. However, while applications in electronics are vigorously being pursued, photonic applications have not attracted as much attention. Here, we report on ultrafast photocurrent response measurements in graphene (single and few-layers) field-effect-transistors (FETs) up to 40 GHz light intensity modulation frequencies, using a 1.55 micron excitation laser. No photoresponse degradation is observable up to the highest measured frequency, demonstrating the feasibility and unique benefits of using graphene in photonics. Further analysis suggests that the intrinsic bandwidth of such graphene FET based photodetectors may exceed 500 GHz. Most notably, the generation and transport of the photo-carriers in such graphene photodetectors are fundamentally different from those in currently known semiconductor photodetectors, leading to a remarkably high bandwidth, zero source-drain bias (hence zero dark current) operation, and good internal quantum efficiency.
  • In principle, the twin paradox offers the possibility to go on a trip to the center of our galaxy or even to the end of our universe within life time. In order to be a most comfortable journey the voyaging twin accelerates with Earth's gravity. We developed some Java applets to visualize what both twins could really measure, namely time signals and light coming from the surrounding sky.