• The charge and spin dynamics of the structurally simplest iron-based superconductor, FeSe, may hold the key to understanding the physics of high temperature superconductors in general. Unlike the iron pnictides, FeSe lacks long range magnetic order in spite of a similar structural transition around 90\,K. Here, we report results of Raman scattering experiments as a function of temperature and polarization and simulations based on exact diagonalization of a frustrated spin model. Both experiment and theory find a persistent low energy peak close to 500cm$^{-1}$ in $B_{1g}$ symmetry, which softens slightly around 100\,K, that we assign to spin excitations. By comparing with results from neutron scattering, this study provides evidence for nearly frustrated stripe order in FeSe.
  • A microscopic understanding of the strongly correlated physics of the cuprates must account for the translational and rotational symmetry breaking that is present across all cuprate families, commonly in the form of stripes. Here we investigate emergence of stripes in the Hubbard model, a minimal model believed to be relevant to the cuprate superconductors, using determinant quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) simulations at finite temperatures and density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) ground state calculations. By varying temperature, doping, and model parameters, we characterize the extent of stripes throughout the phase diagram of the Hubbard model. Our results show that including the often neglected next-nearest-neighbor hopping leads to the absence of spin incommensurability upon electron-doping and nearly half-filled stripes upon hole-doping. The similarities of these findings to experimental results on both electron and hole-doped cuprate families support a unified description across a large portion of the cuprate phase diagram.
  • The pairing symmetry of interacting Dirac fermions on the $\pi$-flux lattice is studied with the determinant quantum Monte Carlo and numerical linked cluster expansion methods. The extended $s^*$- (i.e. extended $s$-) and d-wave pairing symmetries, which are distinct in the conventional square lattice, are degenerate under the Landau gauge. We demonstrate that the dominant pairing channel at strong interactions is an exotic $ds^*$-wave phase consisting of alternating stripes of $s^*$- and d-wave phases. A complementary mean-field analysis shows that while the $s^*$- and d-wave symmetries individually have nodes in the energy spectrum, the $ds^*$ channel is fully gapped. The results represent a new realization of pairing in Dirac systems, connected to the problem of chiral d-wave pairing on the honeycomb lattice, which might be more readily accessed by cold-atom experiments.
  • The superconducting (SC) and charge-density-wave (CDW) susceptibilities of the two dimensional Holstein model are computed using determinant quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC), and compared with results computed using the Migdal-Eliashberg (ME) approach. We access temperatures as low as 25 times less than the Fermi energy, $E_F$, which are still above the SC transition. We find that the SC susceptibility at low $T$ agrees quantitatively with the ME theory up to a dimensionless electron-phonon coupling $\lambda_0 \approx 0.4$ but deviates dramatically for larger $\lambda_0$. We find that for large $\lambda_0$ and small phonon frequency $\omega_0 \ll E_F$ CDW ordering is favored and the preferred CDW ordering vector is uncorrelated with any obvious feature of the Fermi surface.
  • Unravelling the nature of doping-induced transition between a Mott insulator and a weakly correlated metal is crucial to understanding novel emergent phases in strongly correlated materials. For this purpose, we study the evolution of spectral properties upon doping Mott insulating states, by utilizing the cluster perturbation theory on the Hubbard and t-J-like models. Specifically, a quasi-free dispersion crossing the Fermi level develops with small doping, and it eventually evolves into the most dominant feature at high doping levels. Although this dispersion is related to the free electron hopping, our study shows that this spectral feature is in fact influenced inherently by both electron-electron correlation and spin exchange interaction: the correlation destroys coherence, while the coupling between spin and mobile charge restores it in the photoemission spectrum. Due to the persistent impact of correlations and spin physics, the onset of gaps or the high-energy anomaly in the spectral functions can be expected in doped Mott insulators.
  • The nature of superconductivity in the dilute semiconductor SrTiO$_3$ has remained an open question for more than 50 years. The extremely low carrier densities ($10^{18}$ - $10^{20}$ cm$^{-3}$) at which superconductivity occurs suggests an unconventional origin of superconductivity outside of the adiabatic limit on which the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and Migdal-Eliashberg (ME) theories are based. We take advantage of a newly developed method for engineering band alignments at oxide interfaces and access the electronic structure of Nb-doped SrTiO$_3$ using high resolution tunneling spectroscopy. We observe strong coupling to the highest energy longitudinal optic (LO) phonon branch and estimate the doping evolution of the dimensionless electron-phonon interaction strength ($\lambda$). Upon cooling below the superconducting transition temperature ($T_{\mathrm{c}}$), we observe a single superconducting gap corresponding to the weak-coupling limit of BCS theory, indicating an order of magnitude smaller coupling ($\lambda_{\textrm{BCS}} \approx 0.1$). These results suggest that despite the strong normal state interaction with electrons, the highest LO phonon does not provide a dominant contribution to pairing. They further demonstrate that SrTiO$_3$ is an ideal system to probe superconductivity over a wide range of carrier density, adiabatic parameter, and electron-phonon coupling strength.
  • Van der Waals heterostructures, vertical stacks of layered materials, offer newopportunities for novel quantum phenomena which are absent in their constituent components. Here we report the emergence of polaron quasiparticles at the interface of graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) heterostructures. Using nanospot angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we observe zone-corner replicas of h-BN valence band maxima, with energy spacing coincident with the highest phonon energy of the heterostructure|an indication of Frohlich polaron formation due to forward scattering electron-phonon coupling. Parabolic fitting of the h-BN bands yields an effective mass enhancement of ~ 2.3, suggesting an intermediate coupling strength. Our theoretical simulations based on Migdal-Eliashberg theory corroborate the experimental results, allowing the extraction of microscopic physical parameters. Moreover,renormalisation of graphene $\pi$ band is observed due to the hybridisation with the h-BN band. Our work generalises the polaron study from transition metal oxides to Van derWaals heterostructures with higher material exibility, highlighting interlayer coupling as an extra degree of freedom to explore emergent phenomena.
  • The search for quantum spin liquids in frustrated quantum magnets recently has enjoyed a surge of interest, with various candidate materials under intense scrutiny. However, an experimental confirmation of a gapped topological spin liquid remains an open question. Here, we show that circularly-polarized light can provide a novel knob to drive frustrated Mott insulators into a chiral spin liquid (CSL), realizing an elusive quantum spin liquid with topological order. We find that the dynamics of a driven Kagome Mott insulator is well-captured by an effective Floquet spin model, with heating strongly suppressed, inducing a scalar spin chirality $S_i \cdot (S_j \times S_k)$ term which dynamically breaks time-reversal while preserving SU(2) spin symmetry. We fingerprint the transient phase diagram and find a stable photo-induced CSL near the equilibrium state. The results presented suggest employing dynamical symmetry breaking to engineer quantum spin liquids and access elusive phase transitions that are not readily accessible in equilibrium.
  • We present determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the hole-doped single-band Hubbard-Holstein model on a square lattice, to investigate how quasiparticles emerge when doping a Mott insulator (MI) or a Peierls insulator (PI). The MI regime at large Hubbard interaction $U$ and small relative electron-phonon coupling strength $\lambda$ is quickly suppressed upon doping, by drawing spectral weight from the upper Hubbard band and shifting the lower Hubbard band towards the Fermi level, leading to a metallic state with emergent quasiparticles at the Fermi level. On the other hand, the PI regime at large $\lambda$ and small $U$ persists out to relatively high doping levels. We study the evolution of the $d$-wave superconducting susceptibility with doping, and find that it increases with lowering temperature in a regime of intermediate values of $U$ and $\lambda$.
  • Experimental evidence on high-Tc cuprates reveals ubiquitous charge density wave (CDW) modulations, which coexist with superconductivity. Although the CDW had been predicted by theory, important questions remain about the extent to which the CDW influences lattice and charge degrees of freedom and its characteristics as functions of doping and temperature. These questions are intimately connected to the origin of the CDW and its relation to the mysterious cuprate pseudogap. Here, we use ultrahigh resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) to reveal new CDW character in underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} (Bi2212). At low temperature, we observe dispersive excitations from an incommensurate CDW that induces anomalously enhanced phonon intensity, unseen using other techniques. Near the pseudogap temperature T*, the CDW persists, but the associated excitations significantly weaken and the CDW wavevector shifts, becoming nearly commensurate with a periodicity of four lattice constants. The dispersive CDW excitations, phonon anomaly, and temperature dependent commensuration provide a comprehensive momentum space picture of complex CDW behavior and point to a closer relationship with the pseudogap state.
  • Evidence for the presence of high energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La$_{2-x}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$ (LSCO) has raised questions regarding the role of spin-fluctuations in the pairing mechanism. If they remain present in overdoped LSCO, why does $T_c$ decrease in this doping regime? Here, using results for the dynamic spin susceptibility ${\rm Im}\chi(q,\omega)$ obtained from a determinantal quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) calculation for the Hubbard model we address this question. We find that while high energy magnetic excitations persist in the overdoped regime, they lack the momentum to scatter pairs between the anti-nodal regions. It is the decrease in the spectral weight at large momentum transfer, not observed by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), which leads to a reduction in the $d$-wave spin-fluctuation pairing strength.
  • The microscopic mechanism and the experimental identification of it in unconventional superconductors is one of the most vexing problems of contemporary condensed matter physics. We show that Raman spectroscopy provides a new avenue for this quest by probing the structure of the pairing interaction. As a prototypical example, we study the doping dependence of the Raman spectra in different symmetry channels in the s-wave superconductor ${\rm Ba_{1-x}K_xFe_2As_2}$ for $0.22\le x \le 0.70$. The spectra collected in the $B_{1g}$ symmetry channel reveal the existence of two collective modes which are indicative of the presence of two competing, yet subdominant, pairing tendencies of $d_{x^2-y^2}$ symmetry. A functional Renormalization Group (fRG) and random-phase approximation (RPA) study on this material confirms the presence of the two pairing tendencies within a spin-fluctuation scenario. The experimental doping dependence of these modes is also consistently matched by both fRG and RPA studies. Thus our findings strongly support a spin-fluctuation mediated pairing scenario.
  • A quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a novel two-dimensional quantum state of matter that features quantized Hall conductance in the absence of magnetic field, resulting from topologically protected dissipationless edge states that bridge the energy gap opened by band inversion and strong spin-orbit coupling. By investigating electronic structure of epitaxially grown monolayer 1T'-WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we observe clear signatures of the topological band inversion and the band gap opening, which are the hallmarks of a QSH state. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements further confirm the correct crystal structure and the existence of a bulk band gap, and provide evidence for a modified electronic structure near the edge that is consistent with the expectations for a QSH insulator. Our results establish monolayer 1T'-WTe2 as a new class of QSH insulator with large band gap in a robust two-dimensional materials family of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).
  • Upon doping, Mott insulators often exhibit symmetry breaking where charge carriers and their spins organize into patterns known as stripes. For high-Tc superconducting cuprates, stripes are widely suspected to exist in a fluctuating form. Here, we use numerically exact determinant quantum Monte Carlo calculations to demonstrate dynamical stripe correlations in the three-band Hubbard model, which represents the local electronic structure of the Cu-O plane. Our results, which are robust to varying parameters, cluster size, and boundary condition, strongly support the interpretation of a variety of experimental observations in terms of the physics of fluctuating stripes, including the hourglass magnetic dispersion and the Yamada plot of incommensurability vs. doping. These findings provide a novel perspective on the intertwined orders emerging from the cuprates' normal state.
  • Manipulating materials properties far from equilibrium recently garnered significant attention, with experimental emphasis on transient melting, enhancement, or induction of electronic order. A more tantalizing aspect of the matter-light interaction regards the possibility to access dynamical steady states with distinct non-equilibrium phase transitions to affect electronic transport. Here, we show that the interplay of crystal symmetry and optical pumping of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provides a novel avenue to engineer topologically-protected chiral edge modes. In stark contrast to graphene and previously-discussed toy models, the underlying generic mechanism relies on the intrinsic three-band nature of TMDCs near the band edges. Photo-induced band inversions scale linearly in applied pump field and exhibit a transition from one to two chiral edge modes upon sweeping from red to blue detuning. We develop a strategy to understand non-equilibrium Floquet-Bloch bands and topological transitions directly from ab initio calculations, and illustrate for the example of WS$_2$ that control of chiral edge modes can be dictated solely from symmetry principles and is not qualitatively sensitive to microscopic materials details.
  • In this paper, we have systematically studied the single hole problem in two-leg Hubbard and $t$-$J$ ladders by large-scale density-matrix renormalization group calculations. We found that the doped hole in both models behaves similarly with each other while the three-site correlated hopping term is not important in determining the ground state properties. For more insights, we have also calculated the elementary excitations, i.e., the energy gaps to the excited states of the system. In the strong rung limit, we found that the doped hole behaves as a Bloch quasiparticle in both systems where the spin and charge of the doped hole are tightly bound together. In the isotropic limit, while the hole still behaves like a quasiparticle in the long-wavelength limit, its spin and charge components are only loosely bound together with a nontrivial mutual statistics inside the quasiparticle. Our results show that this mutual statistics can lead to an important residual effect which dramatically changes the local structure of the ground state wavefunction.
  • Competition between ordered phases, and their associated phase transitions, are significant in the study of strongly correlated systems. Here we examine one aspect, the nonequilibrium dynamics of a photoexcited Mott-Peierls system, using an effective Peierls-Hubbard model and exact diagonalization. Near a transition where spin and charge become strongly intertwined, we observe anti-phase dynamics and a coupling-strength-dependent suppression or enhancement in the static structure factors. The renormalized bosonic excitations coupled to a particular photoexcited electron can be extracted, which provides an approach for characterizing the underlying bosonic modes. The results from this analysis for different electronic momenta show an uneven softening due to a stronger coupling near $k_F$. This behavior reflects the strong link between the fermionic momenta, the coupling vertices, and ultimately the bosonic susceptibilities when multiple phases compete for the ground state of the system.
  • Despite significant progress in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments on cuprates at the Cu L-edge, a theoretical understanding of the cross-section remains incomplete in terms of elementary excitations and the connection to both charge and spin structure factors. Here we use state-of-the-art, unbiased numerical calculations to study the low energy excitations probed by RIXS in undoped and doped Hubbard model relevant to the cuprates. The results highlight the importance of scattering geometry, in particular both the incident and scattered x-ray photon polarization, and demonstrate that on a qualitative level the RIXS spectral shape in the cross-polarized channel approximates that of the spin dynamical structure factor. However, in the parallel-polarized channel the complexity of the RIXS process beyond a simple two-particle response complicates the analysis, and demonstrates that approximations and expansions which attempt to relate RIXS to less complex correlation functions can not reproduce the full diversity of RIXS spectral features.
  • Using cluster perturbation theory, we explain the origin of the strongly dispersive feature found at high binding energy in the spectral function of the Hubbard model. By comparing the Hubbard and $t\small{-}J\small{-} 3s$ model spectra, we show that this dispersion does not originate from either coupling to spin fluctuations ($\propto\! J$) or the free hopping ($\propto\! t$). Instead, it should be attributed to a long-range, correlated hopping $\propto\! t^2/U$, which allows an effectively free motion of the hole within the same antiferromagnetic sublattice. This origin explains both the formation of the high energy anomaly in the single-particle spectrum and the sensitivity of the high binding energy dispersion to the next-nearest-neighbor hopping $t^\prime$.
  • We develop a first quantization description of fractional Chern insulators that is the dual of the conventional fractional quantum Hall (FQH) problem, with the roles of position and momentum interchanged. In this picture, FQH states are described by anisotropic FQH liquids forming in momentum-space Landau levels in a fluctuating magnetic field. The fundamental quantum geometry of the problem emerges from the interplay of single-body and interaction metrics, both of which act as momentum-space duals of the geometrical picture of the anisotropic FQH effect. We then present a novel broad class of ideal Chern insulator lattice models that act as duals of the isotropic FQH effect. The interacting problem is well-captured by Haldane pseudopotentials and affords a detailed microscopic understanding of the interplay of interactions and non-trivial quantum geometry.
  • Motivated by the recent success in describing the spin and orbital spectrum of a spin-orbital chain using a large-N mean-field approximation [Phys. Rev. B 91, 165102 (2015)], we apply the same formalism to the case of a spin chain in the external magnetic field. It occurs that in this case, which corresponds to N=2 in the approximation, the large-N mean-field theory cannot qualitatively reproduce the spin excitation spectra at high magnetic fields, which polarize more than 50% of the spins in the magnetic ground state. This, rather counterintuitively, shows that the physics of a spin chain can under some circumstances be regarded as more complex than the physics of a spin-orbital chain.
  • Using a combined analytical and numerical approach, we study the collective spin and orbital excitations in a spin-orbital chain under a crystal field. Irrespective of the crystal field strength, these excitations can be universally described by fractionalized fermions. The fractionalization phenomenon persists and contrasts strikingly with the case of a spin chain, where fractionalized spinons cannot be individually observed but confined to form magnons in a strong magnetic field. In the spin-orbital chain, each of the fractional quasiparticles carries both spin and orbital quantum numbers, and the two variables are always entangled in the collective excitations. Our result further shows that the recently reported separation phenomenon occurs when crystal fields fully polarize the orbital degrees of freedom. In this case, however, the spinon and orbiton dynamics are decoupled solely because of a redefinition of the spin and orbital quantum numbers.
  • The spectral energy gap is an important signature that defines states of quantum matter: insulators, density waves, and superconductors have very different gap structures. The momentum resolved nature of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) makes it a powerful tool to characterize spectral gaps. ARPES has been instrumental in establishing the anisotropic d-wave structure of the superconducting gap in high-transition temperature (Tc) cuprates, which is different from the conventional isotropic s-wave superconducting gap. Shortly afterwards, ARPES demonstrated that an anomalous gap above Tc, often termed the pseudogap, follows a similar anisotropy. The nature of this poorly understood pseudogap and its relationship with superconductivity has since become the focal point of research in the field. To address this issue, the momentum, temperature, doping, and materials dependence of spectral gaps have been extensively examined with significantly improved instrumentation and carefully matched experiments in recent years. This article overviews the current understanding and unresolved issues of the basic phenomenology of gap hierarchy. We show how ARPES has been sensitive to phase transitions, has distinguished between orders having distinct broken electronic symmetries, and has uncovered rich momentum and temperature dependent fingerprints reflecting an intertwined & competing relationship between the ordered states and superconductivity that results in multiple phenomenologically-distinct ground states inside the superconducting dome. These results provide us with microscopic insights into the cuprate phase diagram.
  • We report time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the topological insulator Bi2Se3. We observe oscillatory modulations of the electronic structure of both the bulk and surface states at a frequency of 2.23 THz due to coherent excitation of an A1g phonon mode. A distinct, additional frequency of 2.05 THz is observed in the surface state only. The lower phonon frequency at the surface is attributed to the termination of the crystal and thus reduction of interlayer van der Waals forces, which serve as restorative forces for out-of-plane lattice distortions. DFT calculations quantitatively reproduce the magnitude of the surface phonon softening. These results represent the first band-resolved evidence of the A1g phonon mode coupling to the surface state in a topological insulator.
  • In the high-temperature ($T_{c}$) cuprate superconductors, increasing evidence suggests that the pseudogap, existing below the pseudogap temperature $T$*, has a distinct broken electronic symmetry from that of superconductivity. Particularly, recent scattering experiments on the underdoped cuprates have suggested that a charge ordering competes with superconductivity. However, no direct link of this physics and the important low-energy excitations has been identified. Here we report an antagonistic singularity at $T_{c}$ in the spectral weight of Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+{\delta}}$ as a compelling evidence for phase competition, which persists up to a high hole concentration $p$ ~ 0.22. Comparison with a theoretical calculation confirms that the singularity is a signature of competition between the order parameters for the pseudogap and superconductivity. The observation of the spectroscopic singularity at finite temperatures over a wide doping range provides new insights into the nature of the competitive interplay between the two intertwined phases and the complex phase diagram near the pseudogap critical point.