• We present Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of globular clusters (GCs) around the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) VLSB-B, VLSB-D, and VCC615 located in the central regions of the Virgo cluster. We spectroscopically identify 4, 12, and 7 GC satellites of these UDGs, respectively. We find that the three UDGs have systemic velocities ($V_{sys}$) consistent with being in the Virgo cluster, and that they span a wide range of velocity dispersions, from $\sim 16$ to $\sim 47$ km/s, and high dynamical mass-to-light ratios within the radius that contains half the number of GCs ($ 407^{+916}_{-407}$, $21^{+15}_{-11}$, $60^{+65}_{-38}$, respectively). VLSB-D shows possible evidence for rotation along the stellar major axis and its $V_{sys}$ is consistent with that of the massive galaxy M84 and the center of the Virgo cluster itself. These findings, in addition to having a dynamically and spatially ($\sim 1$ kpc) off-centered nucleus and being extremely elongated, suggest that VLSB-D could be tidally perturbed. On the contrary, VLSB-B and VCC615 show no signals of tidal deformation. Whereas the dynamics of VLSB-D suggest that it has a less massive dark matter halo than expected for its stellar mass, VLSB-B and VCC615 are consistent with a $\sim 10^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$ dark matter halo. Although our samples of galaxies and GCs are small, these results suggest that UDGs may be a diverse population, with their low surface brightnesses being the result of very early formation, tidal disruption, or a combination of the two.
  • We present an analysis of 39 nuclei and their early-type hosts in the Virgo Cluster using ten broadband filters: F300W, F475W, F850LP, F160W, $u^*griz$, and $K_s$. We describe the Virgo Redux program, which provides high-resolution UV and NIR imaging. Combining this data with optical and NIR imaging from the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey and the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey, we estimate masses, metallicities and ages using simple stellar population (SSP) models. For 19 nuclei, we compare to SSP parameters derived from Keck and Gemini spectra and find reasonable agreement between the photometric and spectroscopic metallicity: the RMS scatter is 0.3 dex. We reproduce the nucleus-galaxy mass fraction of $0.33^{+0.09}_{-0.07}$ percent for galaxy stellar masses $10^{8.4}-10^{10.3} M_\odot$ with a typical precision of $\sim$35% for the nuclei masses. Based on available model predictions, there is no single preferred formation scenario for nuclei, suggesting that nuclei are formed stochastically through a mix of processes. Nuclei metallicities are statistically identical to those of their hosts, appearing $0.07 \pm 0.3$ dex more metal-rich on average -- although, omitting galaxies with unusual origins, nuclei are $0.20\pm0.28$ dex more metal-rich. Nuclei appear to be $0.56 \pm 0.12$ dex more metal rich than ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) at fixed mass. We find no clear age difference between nuclei and their galaxies, with nuclei displaying a broad range of ages. Interestingly, we find that the most massive nuclei may be flatter and more closely aligned with the semi-major axes of their hosts, suggesting that they formed through predominantly dissipative processes.
  • We present a study of the dynamical properties of 125 compact stellar systems (CSSs) in the nearby giant elliptical galaxy NGC5128, using high-resolution spectra (R 26,000) obtained with VLT/FLAMES. Our results provide evidence for a new type of star cluster, based on the CSS dynamical mass scaling relations. All radial velocity (v_r) and line-of-sight velocity dispersion (sigma_los) measurements are performed with the penalized pixel fitting (ppxf) technique, which provided sigma_ppxf estimates for 115 targets. The sigma_ppxf estimates are corrected to the 2D projected half-light radii, sigma_{1/2}, as well as the cluster cores, sigma_0, accounting for observational/aperture effects and are combined with structural parameters, from high spatial resolution imaging, in order to derive total dynamical masses (M_dyn) for 112 members of NGC5128's star cluster system. In total, 89 CSSs have dynamical masses measured for the first time along with the corresponding dynamical mass-to-light ratios (Upsilon_V^dyn). We find two distinct sequences in the Upsilon_V^dyn - M_dyn plane, which are well approximated by power laws of the forms Upsilon_V^dyn M_dyn^0.33+\-0.04 and Upsilon_V^dyn - M_dyn^0.79+\-0.04. The shallower sequence corresponds to the very bright tail of the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF), while the steeper relation appears to be populated by a distinct group of objects which require significant dark gravitating components such as central massive black holes and/or exotically concentrated dark matter distributions. This result would suggest that the formation and evolution of these CSSs are markedly different from the "classical" globular clusters in NGC5128 and the Local Group, despite the fact that these clusters have luminosities similar to the GCLF turn-over magnitude. We include a thorough discussion of myriad factors potentially influencing our measurements.
  • We present scaling relations between structural properties of nuclear star clusters and their host galaxies for a sample of early-type dwarf galaxies observed as part of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Coma Cluster Survey. We have analysed the light profiles of 200 early-type dwarf galaxies in the magnitude range $16.0 < m_{F814W} < 22.6 $ mag, corresponding to $-19.0 < M_{F814W} < -12.4 $ mag. Nuclear star clusters are detected in 80% of the galaxies, thus doubling the sample of HST-observed early-type dwarf galaxies with nuclear star clusters. \changed{We confirm that the} nuclear star cluster detection fraction decreases strongly toward faint magnitudes. The luminosities of nuclear star clusters do not scale linearly with host galaxy luminosity. A linear fit yields L$_{nuc} \sim $L$_{gal}^{0.57\pm0.05}$. The nuclear star cluster-host galaxy luminosity scaling relation for low-mass early-type dwarf galaxies is consistent with formation by globular cluster accretion. We find that at similar luminosities, galaxies with higher S\'ersic indices have slightly more luminous nuclear star clusters. Rounder galaxies have on average more luminous clusters. Some of the nuclear star clusters are resolved, despite the distance of Coma. We argue that the relation between nuclear star cluster mass and size is consistent with both formation by globular cluster accretion and in situ formation. Our data are consistent with GC inspiraling being the dominant mechanism at low masses, although the observed trend with S\'ersic index suggests that in situ star formation is an important second order effect.
  • We study the dynamics of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 from the central to the outermost regions with the made-to-measure (M2M) method. We use a new catalogue of 922 globular cluster line-of- sight velocities extending to a projected radius of 180 kpc (equivalent to 25 M87 effective radii), and SAURON integral field unit data within the central 2.4 kpc. 263 globular clusters, mainly located beyond 40 kpc, are newly observed by the Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS). For the M2M modelling, the gravitational potential is taken as a combination of a luminous matter potential with a constant stellar mass-to-light ratio and a dark matter potential modelled as a logarithmic potential. Our best dynamical model returns a stellar mass-to-light ratio in the I band of M/LI = 6.0(+ -0.3) M_sun/L_sun with a dark matter potential scale velocity of 591(+ -50) km/s and scale radius of 42(+ -10) kpc. We determine the total mass of M87 within 180 kpc to be (1.5 + - 0.2) 10^13 M_sun. The mass within 40 kpc is smaller than previous estimates determined using globular cluster kinematics that did not extend beyond 45 kpc. With our new globular cluster velocities at much larger radii, we see that globular clusters around 40 kpc show an anomalously large velocity dispersion which affected previous results. The mass we derived is in good agreement with that inferred from ROSAT X-ray observation out to 180 kpc. Within 30 kpc our mass is also consistent with that inferred from Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations, while within 120 kpc it is about 20% smaller. The model velocity dispersion anisotropy beta parameter for the globular clusters in M87 is small, varying from -0.2 at the centre to 0.2 at 40 kpc, and gradually decreasing to zero at 120 kpc.
  • We constrain the assembly history of galaxies in the projected central 0.5 Mpc of the Coma cluster by performing structural decomposition on 69 massive (M_star >= 10^9 M_sun) galaxies using high-resolution F814W images from the HST Treasury Survey of Coma. Each galaxy is modeled with up to three Sersic components having a free Sersic index n. After excluding the two cDs in the projected central 0.5 Mpc of Coma, 57% of the galactic stellar mass in the projected central 0.5 Mpc of Coma resides in classical bulges/ellipticals while 43% resides in cold disk-dominated structures. Most of the stellar mass in Coma may have been assembled through major (and possibly minor) mergers. Hubble types are assigned based on the decompositions, and we find a strong morphology-density relation; the ratio of (E+S0):spirals is (91.0%):9.0%. In agreement with earlier work, the size of outer disks in Coma S0s/spirals is smaller compared with lower-density environments captured with SDSS (Data Release 2). Among similar-mass clusters from a hierarchical semi-analytic model, no single cluster can simultaneously match all the global properties of the Coma cluster. The model strongly overpredicts the mass of cold gas and underpredicts the mean fraction of stellar mass locked in hot components over a wide range of galaxy masses. We suggest that these disagreements with the model result from missing cluster physics (e.g., ram-pressure stripping), and certain bulge assembly modes (e.g., mergers of clumps). Overall, our study of Coma underscores that galaxy evolution is not solely a function of stellar mass, but also of environment.
  • We examine the nuclear morphology, kinematics, and stellar populations in nearby S0 galaxy NGC 404 using a combination of adaptive optics assisted near-IR integral-field spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and HST imaging. These observations enable study of the NGC 404 nucleus at a level of detail possible only in the nearest galaxies. The surface brightness profile suggests the presence of three components, a bulge, a nuclear star cluster, and a central light excess within the cluster at radii <3 pc. These components have distinct kinematics with modest rotation seen in the nuclear star cluster and counter-rotation seen in the central excess. Molecular hydrogen emission traces a disk with rotation nearly orthogonal to that of the stars. The stellar populations of the three components are also distinct, with half of the mass of the nuclear star cluster having ages of ~1 Gyr (perhaps resulting from a galaxy merger), while the bulge is dominated by much older stars. Dynamical modeling of the stellar kinematics gives a total nuclear star cluster mass of 1.1x10^7 Msol. Dynamical detection of a possible intermediate mass black hole is hindered by uncertainties in the central stellar mass profile. Assuming a constant mass-to-light ratio, the stellar dynamical modeling suggests a black hole mass of <1x10^5 Msol, while the molecular hydrogen gas kinematics are best fit by a black hole with mass of 4.5x10^5 Msol. Unresolved and possibly variable dust emission in the near-infrared and AGN-like molecular hydrogen emission line ratios do suggest the presence of an accreting black hole in this nearby LINER galaxy.
  • We summarize the recent results of our survey of the nearest nuclear star clusters. The purpose of the survey is to understand nuclear star cluster formation mechanisms and constrain the presence of black holes using adaptive optics assisted integral field spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and HST imaging in 13 galaxies within 5 Mpc. We discuss the formation history of the nuclear star cluster and possible detection of an intermediate mass BH in NGC 404, the nearest S0 galaxy.