• INTEGRAL observed the nova V5668 Sgr around the time of its optical maximum on March 21, 2015. Studies at UV wavelengths showed spectral lines of freshly produced Be-7. This could be measurable also in gamma-rays at 478 keV from the decay to Li-7. Novae are also expected to synthesise Na-22 which decays to Ne-22, emitting a 1275 keV photon. About one week before the optical maximum, a strong gamma-ray flash on time-scales of hours is expected from short-lived radioactive nuclei, such as N-13 and F-18. These beta-plus-unstable nuclei should yield emission up to 511 keV, but which has never been observed. The spectrometer SPI aboard INTEGRAL pointed towards V5668 by chance. We use these observations to search for possible gamma-ray emission of decaying Be-7, and to directly measure the synthesised mass during explosive burning. We also aim to constrain possible burst-like emission days to weeks before the optical maximum using the SPI anticoincidence shield (ACS). We extract spectral and temporal information to determine the fluxes of gamma-ray lines at 478 keV, 511 keV, and 1275 keV. A measured flux value directly converts into abundances produced by the nova. The SPI-ACS rates are analysed for burst-like emission using a nova model light-curve. For the obtained nova flash candidate events, we discuss possible origins. No significant excess for the expected gamma-ray lines is found. Our upper limits on the synthesised Be-7 and Na-22 mass depend on the uncertainties of the distance to the nova: The Be-7 mass is constrained to less than $4.8\times10^{-9}\,(d/kpc)^2$, and Na-22 to less than $2.4\times10^{-8}\,(d/kpc)^2$ solar masses. For the Be-7 mass estimate from UV studies, the distance to V5668 Sgr must be larger than 1.2 kpc. During three weeks before the optical maximum, we find 23 burst-like events in the ACS rate, of which six could possibly be associated with V5668 Sgr.
  • INTEGRAL/SPI is a space-based coded mask telescope featuring a 19-element Germanium detector array for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, encapsulated in a scintillation detector assembly that provide a veto for background from charged particles. In space, cosmic rays irradiate spacecraft and instrument, which results in a large instrumental background from activation of those materials, and leads to deterioration of the charge collection properties of the Ge detectors. We use 13.5 years of INTEGRAL/SPI spectra for each detector and for each pointing of the satellite. Spectral fits provide us with details about separated background components. From the strongest background lines, we first determine how the spectral response changes with time. We then determine how the instrumental background components change in intensities and other characteristics, most-importantly their relative distribution among detectors. Spectral resolution of Ge detectors in space degrades with time, up to 15% within half a year, consistently for all detectors, and across the SPI energy range. Semi-annual annealing operations recover these losses, yet there is a small long-term degradation. The intensity of instrumental background varies anti-correlated to solar activity, in general. There are significant differences among different lines and with respect to continuum. Background lines are found to have a characteristic, well-defined and long-term consistent intensity ratio among detectors. We use this to categorise lines in groups of similar behaviour. The dataset of spectral-response and background parameters as fitted across the INTEGRAL mission allows studies of SPI spectral response and background behaviour in a broad perspective, and efficiently supports precision modelling of instrumental background.
  • The electron-positron annihilation gamma-ray signal at 511 keV in the Milky Way is investigated towards a possible dark matter interpretation. If all bulge positrons were created by dark matter particle annihilation, the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, apparently being dominated by dark matter, should also show measurable 511 keV signals. Using INTEGRAL/SPI, we test for emission in 39 neighbouring dwarf satellite galaxies, and found a consistent trend against a dark matter scenario. One galaxy, Reticulum II, shows up as a strong source of annihilation emission, which we interpret as the presence of a microquasar, ejecting pair-plasma into the galaxy's interstellar medium.
  • The measurement of gamma rays from the diffuse afterglow of radioactivity originating in massive-star nucleosynthesis is considered a laboratory for testing models, when specific stellar groups are investigated, at known distance and with well-constrained stellar population. Regions which have been exploited for such studies include Cygnus, Carina, Orion, and Scorpius-Centaurus. The Orion region hosts the Orion OB1 association and its subgroups at about 450~pc distance. We report the detection of $^{26}$Al gamma rays from this region with INTEGRAL/SPI.
  • The positron annihilation gamma-ray signal in the Milky Way (MW) shows a puzzling morphology: a very bright bulge and a very low surface-brightness disk. A coherent explanation of the positron origin, propagation through the Galaxy and subsequent annihilation in the interstellar medium has not yet been found. Tentative explanations involve positrons from radioactivity, X-ray binaries, and dark matter (DM). Dwarf satellite galaxies (DSGs) are believed to be DM-dominated and hence promising candidates in the search for 511 keV emission as a result of DM annihilation into electron-positron pairs. The goal of this study is to constrain possible 511 keV gamma-ray signals from 39 DSGs of the MW and to test the annihilating DM scenario. We use the spectrometer SPI on INTEGRAL to extract individual spectra for the studied objects. As the diffuse galactic emission dominates the signal, the large scale morphology of the MW has been modelled accordingly and was included in a maximum likelihood analysis. Alternatively, a distance-weighted stacked spectrum has been determined. Only Reticulum II (Ret II) shows a 3.1 sigma signal. Five other sources show tentative 2 sigma signals. The mass-to-511-keV-luminosity-ratio shows a marginal trend towards higher values for intrinsically brighter objects, opposite to the V band mass-to-light-ratio, which is generally used to uncover DM in DSGs. All derived flux values are above the level implied by a DM interpretation of the MW bulge signal. The signal from Ret II is unlikely to be related to a DM origin alone, otherwise, the MW bulge would be about 100 times brighter than what is seen. Ret II is exceptional considering the DSG sample, and rather points to enhanced recent star formation activity, if its origins are similar to processes in the MW. Understanding this emission may provide further clues regarding the origin of the annihilation emission in the MW.
  • Microquasars are stellar-mass black holes accreting matter from a companion star and ejecting plasma jets at almost the speed of light. They are analogues of quasars that contain supermassive black holes of $10^6$ to $10^{10}$ solar masses. Accretion in microquasars varies on much shorter timescales than in quasars and occasionally produces exceptionally bright X-ray flares. How the flares are produced is unclear, as is the mechanism for launching the relativistic jets and their composition. An emission line near 511 kiloelectronvolts has long been sought in the emission spectrum of microquasars as evidence for the expected electron-positron plasma. Transient high-energy spectral features have been reported in two objects, but their positron interpretation remains contentious. Here we report observations of $\gamma$-ray emission from the microquasar V404 Cygni during a recent period of strong flaring activity. The emission spectrum around 511 kiloelectronvolts shows clear signatures of variable positron annihilation, which implies a high rate of positron production. This supports the earlier conjecture that microquasars may be the main sources of the electron-positron plasma responsible for the bright diffuse emission of annihilation $\gamma$-rays in the bulge region of our Galaxy. Additionally, microquasars could be the origin of the observed megaelectronvolt continuum excess in the inner Galaxy.
  • The annihilation of positrons in the Galaxy's interstellar medium produces characteristic gamma-rays with a line at 511 keV. This emission has been observed with the spectrometer SPI on INTEGRAL, confirming a puzzling morphology with bright emission from an extended bulge-like region, and faint disk emission. Most plausible sources of positrons are believed to be distributed throughout the disk of the Galaxy. We aim to constrain characteristic spectral shapes for different spatial components in the disk and bulge with the high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer SPI, based on a new instrumental background method and detailed multi-component sky model fitting. We confirm the detection of the main extended components of characteristic annihilation gamma-ray signatures at 58$\sigma$ significance in the line. The total Galactic line intensity amounts to $(2.7\pm0.3)\times10^{-3}~\mathrm{ph~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}}$ for our assumed spatial model. We derive spectra for the bulge and disk, and a central point-like and at the position of Sgr A*, and discuss spectral differences. The bulge shows a 511 keV line intensity of $(0.96\pm0.07)\times10^{-3}~\mathrm{ph~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}}$ and an ortho-positronium continuum equivalent to a positronium fraction of ($1.08\pm0.03$). The 2D-Gaussian representing the disk has an extent of $60^{+10}_{-5}$ deg in longitude and a latitudinal extent of $10.5^{+2.5}_{-1.5}$ deg; the line intensity is $(1.7\pm0.4)\times10^{-3}~\mathrm{ph~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}}$ with a marginal detection of ortho-positronium and an overall diffuse Galactic continuum of $(5.85\pm1.05)\times10^{-5}~\mathrm{ph~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}~keV^{-1}}$ at 511 keV. The disk shows no flux asymmetry between positive and negative longitudes, although spectral details differ. The flux ratio between bulge and disk is ($0.6\pm0.1$). The central source has an intensity of $(0.8\pm0.2)\times10^{-4}~\mathrm{ph~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}}$.
  • The 340-year old supernova remnant Cassiopeia A at 3.4 kpc distance is the best-studied young core-collapse supernova remnant. Nucleosynthesis yields in radioactive isotopes have been studied with different methods, in particular for production and ejection of $^{44}$Ti and $^{56}$Ni which originate from the innermost regions of the supernova. $^{44}$Ti was first discovered in this remnant, but is not seen consistently in other core-collapse sources. We analyse the observations accumulated with the SPI spectrometer on INTEGRAL, together with an improved instrumental background method, to achieve high spectroscopic resolution which enables interpretation towards a velocity constraint on $^{44}$Ti ejecta from the 1.157 MeV $\gamma$-ray line of the $^{44}$Sc decay. We observe both the hard X-ray line at 78 keV and the $\gamma$-ray line at 1157 keV from the $^{44}$Ti decay chain, at a combined significance of 3.8 $\sigma$. Measured fluxes are $(2.1\pm0.4)~10^{-5}~\mathrm{ph~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}}$ and $(3.5\pm1.2)~10^{-5}~\mathrm{ph~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}}$, which corresponds to $(1.5\pm0.4)~10^{-4}$ and $(2.4\pm0.9)~10^{-4}~\mathrm{M}_{\odot}$ of $^{44}$Ti, respectively. The measured Doppler broadening of the lines implies expansion velocities of $4300$ and $2200~\mathrm{km~s^{-1}}$, respectively. Combining our results with previous studies, we determine a more precise estimate of ejected $^{44}$Ti of $(1.37\pm0.19)~10^{-4}~\mathrm{M}_{\odot}$. The measurements of both lines are consistent with previous studies. The flux in the line originating from excited $^{44}$Ca is significantly higher than the flux determined in the lines from $^{44}$Sc. Cosmic ray acceleration within the supernova remnant may be responsible for an additional contribution to this line from nuclear de-excitation following energetic particle collisions in the remnant and swept-up material.
  • High energy resolution spectroscopy of the 1.8 MeV radioactive decay line of 26Al with the SPI instrument on board the INTEGRAL satellite has recently revealed that diffuse 26Al has large velocities in comparison to other components of the interstellar medium in the Milky Way. 26Al shows Galactic rotation in the same sense as the stars and other gas tracers, but reaches excess velocities up to 300 km/s. We investigate if this result can be understood in the context of superbubbles, taking into account the statistics of young star clusters and H I supershells, as well as the association of young star clusters with spiral arms. We derive energy output and 26Al mass of star clusters as a function of the cluster mass via population synthesis from stellar evolutionary tracks of massive stars. [...] We link this to the size distribution of HI supershells and assess the properties of likely 26Al-carrying superbubbles. 26Al is produced by star clusters of all masses above about 200 solar masses, roughly equally contributed over a logarithmic star cluster mass scale, and strongly linked to the injection of feedback energy. The observed superbubble size distribution cannot be related to the star cluster mass function in a straight forward manner. In order to avoid that the added volume of all superbubbles exceeds the volume of the Milky Way, individual superbubbles have to merge frequently. If any two superbubbles merge, or if 26Al is injected off-centre in a bigger HI supershell we expect the hot 26Al-carrying gas to obtain velocities of the order of the typical sound speed in superbubbles, about 300 km/s before decay. [...]
  • On 21 January 2014, SN2014J was discovered in M82 and found to be the closest type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in the last four decades. INTEGRAL observed SN2014J from the end of January until late June for a total exposure time of about 7 Ms. SNe Ia light curves are understood to be powered by the radioactive decay of iron peak elements of which $^{56}$Ni is dominantly synthesized during the thermonuclear disruption of a CO white dwarf (WD). The measurement of $\gamma$-ray lines from the decay chain $^{56}$Ni$\rightarrow$$^{56}$Co$\rightarrow$$^{56}$Fe provides unique information about the explosion in supernovae. Canonical models assume $^{56}$Ni buried deeply in the supernova cloud, absorbing most of the early $\gamma$-rays, and only the consecutive decay of $^{56}$Co should become directly observable through the overlaying material several weeks after the explosion when the supernova envelope dilutes as it expands. Surprisingly, with the spectrometer on INTEGRAL, SPI, we detected $^{56}$Ni $\gamma$-ray lines at 158 and 812 keV at early times with flux levels corresponding to roughly 10% of the total expected amount of $^{56}$Ni, and at relatively small velocities. This implies some mechanism to create a major amout of $^{56}$Ni at the outskirts, and at the same time to break the spherical symmetry of the supernova. One plausible explanation would be a belt accreted from a He companion star, exploding, and triggering the explosion of the white dwarf. The full set of observations of SN2014J show $^{56}$Co $\gamma$-ray lines at 847 and 1238 keV, and we determine for the first time a SN Ia $\gamma$-ray light curve. The irregular appearance of these $\gamma$-ray lines allows deeper insights about the explosion morphology from its temporal evolution and provides additional evidence for an asymmetric explosion, from our high-resolution spectroscopy and comparisons with recent models.
  • The measurement of gamma-ray lines from the decay chain of 56Ni provides unique information about the explosion in supernovae. The 56Ni freshly-produced in the supernova powers the optical light curve, as it emits gamma-rays upon its radioactive decay to 56Co and then 56Fe. Gamma-ray lines from 56Co decay are expected to become directly visible through the overlying white dwarf material several weeks after the explosion, as they progressively penetrate the overlying material of the supernova envelope, diluted as it expands. The lines are expected to be Doppler-shifted or broadened from the kinematics of the 56Ni ejecta. With the SPI spectrometer on INTEGRAL and using an improved instrumental background method, we detect the two main lines from 56Co decay at 847 and 1238 keV from SN2014J at 3.3 Mpc, significantly Doppler-broadened, and at intensities (3.65+/-1.21) 10^-4 and (2.27+/-0.69) 10^-4 ph cm^-2s^-1, respectively, at brightness maximum. We measure their rise towards a maximum after about 60-100 days and decline thereafter. The intensity ratio of the two lines is found consistent with expectations from 56Co decay (0.62+/-0.28 at brightness maximum, expected is 0.68). We find that the broad lines seen in the late, gamma-ray transparent phase are not representative for the early gamma-ray emission, and rather notice the emission spectrum to be complex and irregular until the supernova is fully transparent to gamma-rays, with progressive uncovering of the bulk of 56Ni. We infer that the explosion morphology is not spherically symmetric, both in the distribution of 56Ni and of the unburnt material which occults the 56Co emission. Comparing light curves from different plausible models, the resulting 56Ni mass is determined as 0.49+/-0.09 M_sol.
  • Type-Ia supernovae result from binary systems that include a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, and these thermonuclear explosions typically produce 0.5 M_solar of radioactive 56Ni. The 56Ni is commonly believed to be buried deeply in the expanding supernova cloud. Surprisingly, in SN2014J we detected the lines at 158 and 812 keV from 56Ni decay ({\tau}~8.8 days) earlier than the expected several-week time scale, only ~20 days after the explosion, and with flux levels corresponding to roughly 10% of the total expected amount of 56Ni. Some mechanism must break the spherical symmetry of the supernova, and at the same time create a major amount of 56Ni at the outskirts. A plausible explanation is that a belt of helium from the companion star is accreted by the white dwarf, where this material explodes and then triggers the supernova event.