• Topological crystalline insulators have been recently predicted and observed in rock-salt structure SnSe $\{111\}$ thin films. Previous studies have suggested that the Se-terminated surface of this thin film with hydrogen passivation, has a reduced surface energy and is thus a preferred configuration. In this paper, synchrotron-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, along with density functional theory calculations, are used to demonstrate conclusively that a rock-salt SnSe $\{111\}$ thin film epitaxially-grown on \ce{Bi2Se3} has a stable Sn-terminated surface. These observations are supported by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) intensity-voltage measurements and dynamical LEED calculations, which further show that the Sn-terminated SnSe $\{111\}$ thin film has undergone a surface structural relaxation of the interlayer spacing between the Sn and Se atomic planes. In sharp contrast to the Se-terminated counterpart, the observed Dirac surface state in the Sn-terminated SnSe $\{111\}$ thin film is shown to yield a high Fermi velocity, $0.50\times10^6$m/s, which suggests a potential mechanism of engineering the Dirac surface state of topological materials by tuning the surface configuration.
  • We performed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies on a series of FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_{x}$ monolayer films grown on SrTiO$_{3}$. The superconductivity of the films is robust and rather insensitive to the variations of the band position and effective mass caused by the substitution of Se by Te. However, the band gap between the electron- and hole-like bands at the Brillouin zone center decreases towards band inversion and parity exchange, which drive the system to a nontrivial topological state predicted by theoretical calculations. Our results provide a clear experimental indication that the FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_{x}$ monolayer materials are high-temperature connate topological superconductors in which band topology and superconductivity are integrated intrinsically.
  • HoTe$_{3}$, a member of the rare-earth tritelluride ($R$Te$_{3}$) family, and its Pd-intercalated compounds, Pd$_x$HoTe$_{3}$, where superconductivity (SC) sets in as the charge-density wave (CDW) transition is suppressed by the intercalation of a small amount of Pd, are investigated using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and electrical resistivity. Two incommensurate CDWs with perpendicular nesting vectors are observed in HoTe$_{3}$ at low temperatures. With a slight Pd intercalation ($x$ = 0.01), the large CDW gap decreases and the small one increases. The momentum dependence of the gaps along the inner Fermi surface (FS) evolves from orthorhombicity to near tetragonality, manifesting the competition between two CDW orders. At $x$ = 0.02, both CDW gaps decreases with the emergence of SC. Further increasing the content of Pd for $x$ = 0.04 will completely suppress the CDW instabilities and give rise to the maximal SC order. The evolution of the electronic structures and electron-phonon couplings (EPCs) of the multiple CDWs upon Pd intercalation are carefully scrutinized. We discuss the interplay between multiple CDW orders, and the competition between CDW and SC in detail.
  • The phase transition from a topological insulator to a trivial band insulator is studied by angle-resoled photoemission spectroscopy on Bi$_{2-x}$In$_{x}$Se$_{3}$ single crystals. We first report the complete evolution of the bulk band structures throughout the transition. The robust surface state and the bulk gap size ($\sim$ 0.50 eV) show no significant change upon doping for $x$ = 0.05, 0.10 and 0.175. At $x$ $\geq$ 0.225, the surface state completely disappears and the bulk gap size increases, suggesting a sudden gap-closure and topological phase transition around $x \sim$ 0.175$-$0.225. We discuss the underlying mechanism of the phase transition, proposing that it is governed by the combined effect of spin-orbit coupling and interactions upon band hybridization. Our study provides a new venue to investigate the mechanism of the topological phase transition induced by non-magnetic impurities.
  • Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) have been investigated on single crystal samples of KFe2As2. A van Hove singularity (vHs) has been directly observed just a few meV below the Fermi level E_F of superconducting KFe2As2, which locates in the middle of the principle axes of the first Brillouin zone. The majority of the density-of-states at E_F, mainly contributed by the proximity effect of the saddle point to E_F, is non-gapped in the superconducting state. Our observation of nodal behavior of the momentum area close to the vHs points, while providing consistent explanations to many exotic behaviours previously observed in this material, suggests Cooper pairing induced by a strong coupling mechanism.
  • We present a study of the tetragonal to collapsed-tetragonal transition of CaFe2As2 using angle-resolved photoemission experiments and dynamical mean field theory-based electronic structure calculations. We observe that the collapsed-tetragonal phase exhibits reduced correlations and a higher coherence temperature due to the stronger Fe-As hybridization. Furthermore, a comparison of measured photoemission spectra and theoretical spectral functions shows that momentum-dependent corrections to the density functional band structure are essential for the description of low-energy quasiparticle dispersions. We introduce those using the recently proposed combined "Screened Exchange + Dynamical Mean Field Theory" scheme.
  • The electronic structure of the intercalated iron-based superconductor Ba2Ti2Fe2As4O (Tc - 21.5 K) has been investigated by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and combined local density approximation and dynamical mean field theory calculations. The electronic states near the Fermi level are dominated by both the Fe 3d and Ti 3d orbitals, indicating that the spacing layers separating different FeAs layers are also metallic. By counting the enclosed volumes of the Fermi surface sheets, we observe a large self-doping effect, i.e. 0.25 electrons per unit cell are transferred from the FeAs layer to the Ti2As2O layer, leaving the FeAs layer in a hole-doped state. This exotic behavior is successfully reproduced by our dynamical mean field calculations, in which the self-doping effect is attributed to the electronic correlations in the Fe 3d shell. Our work provides an alternative route of effective doping without element substitution for iron-based superconductors.