• The intrinsic charge transport of stanene is investigated by using density function theory and density function perturbation theory coupled with Boltzmann transport equations from first principles. The accurate Wannier interpolations are applied to calculate the charge carrier scatterings with all branches of phonons with dispersion contribution. The intrinsic carrier mobilities are predicted to be 2~3$\times10^3$ cm$^2$/(V s) at 300 K, and we find that the intervalley scatterings from the out-of-plane and transverse acoustic phonon modes dominate the carrier relaxation. In contrast, the intrinsic carrier mobilities obtained by the conventional deformation potential approach (Long et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17728) are found to as large as 2~3$\times$10$^6$ cm$^2$/(V s) at 300 K, in which the longitudinal acoustic phonons are assumed to be the only scattering mechanism. The inadequacy of the deformation potential approximation in stanene is attributed to the buckling of the honeycomb structure, which originates from the $sp^2-sp^3$ orbital hybridization and results in broken mirror symmetry as compared to graphene. The high carrier mobility of stanene renders it a promising candidate in nanoelectronics and spintronics applications and we propose to enhance its carrier mobilities by suppressing the out-of-plane vibrations by substrate suspension or clamping.
  • We study the problem of estimating the relative depth order of point pairs in a monocular image. Recent advances mainly focus on using deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) to learn and infer the ordinal information from multiple contextual information of the points pair such as global scene context, local contextual information, and the locations. However, it remains unclear how much each context contributes to the task. To address this, we first examine the contribution of each context cue [1], [2] to the performance in the context of depth order estimation. We find out the local context surrounding the points pair contributes the most and the global scene context helps little. Based on the findings, we propose a simple method, using a multi-scale densely-connected network to tackle the task. Instead of learning the global structure, we dedicate to explore the local structure by learning to regress from regions of multiple sizes around the point pairs. Moreover, we use the recent densely connected network [3] to encourage substantial feature reuse as well as deepen our network to boost the performance. We show in experiments that the results of our approach is on par with or better than the state-of-the-art methods with the benefit of using only a small number of training data.
  • We consider a partially linear framework for modelling massive heterogeneous data. The major goal is to extract common features across all sub-populations while exploring heterogeneity of each sub-population. In particular, we propose an aggregation type estimator for the commonality parameter that possesses the (non-asymptotic) minimax optimal bound and asymptotic distribution as if there were no heterogeneity. This oracular result holds when the number of sub-populations does not grow too fast. A plug-in estimator for the heterogeneity parameter is further constructed, and shown to possess the asymptotic distribution as if the commonality information were available. We also test the heterogeneity among a large number of sub-populations. All the above results require to regularize each sub-estimation as though it had the entire sample size. Our general theory applies to the divide-and-conquer approach that is often used to deal with massive homogeneous data. A technical by-product of this paper is the statistical inferences for the general kernel ridge regression. Thorough numerical results are also provided to back up our theory.
  • We propose a likelihood ratio based inferential framework for high dimensional semiparametric generalized linear models. This framework addresses a variety of challenging problems in high dimensional data analysis, including incomplete data, selection bias, and heterogeneous multitask learning. Our work has three main contributions. (i) We develop a regularized statistical chromatography approach to infer the parameter of interest under the proposed semiparametric generalized linear model without the need of estimating the unknown base measure function. (ii) We propose a new framework to construct post-regularization confidence regions and tests for the low dimensional components of high dimensional parameters. Unlike existing post-regularization inferential methods, our approach is based on a novel directional likelihood. In particular, the framework naturally handles generic regularized estimators with nonconvex penalty functions and it can be used to infer least false parameters under misspecified models. (iii) We develop new concentration inequalities and normal approximation results for U-statistics with unbounded kernels, which are of independent interest. We demonstrate the consequences of the general theory by using an example of missing data problem. Extensive simulation studies and real data analysis are provided to illustrate our proposed approach.
  • We propose a robust inferential procedure for assessing uncertainties of parameter estimation in high-dimensional linear models, where the dimension $p$ can grow exponentially fast with the sample size $n$. Our method combines the de-biasing technique with the composite quantile function to construct an estimator that is asymptotically normal. Hence it can be used to construct valid confidence intervals and conduct hypothesis tests. Our estimator is robust and does not require the existence of first or second moment of the noise distribution. It also preserves efficiency in the sense that the worst case efficiency loss is less than 30\% compared to the square-loss-based de-biased Lasso estimator. In many cases our estimator is close to or better than the latter, especially when the noise is heavy-tailed. Our de-biasing procedure does not require solving the $L_1$-penalized composite quantile regression. Instead, it allows for any first-stage estimator with desired convergence rate and empirical sparsity. The paper also provides new proof techniques for developing theoretical guarantees of inferential procedures with non-smooth loss functions. To establish the main results, we exploit the local curvature of the conditional expectation of composite quantile loss and apply empirical process theories to control the difference between empirical quantities and their conditional expectations. Our results are established under weaker assumptions compared to existing work on inference for high-dimensional quantile regression. Furthermore, we consider a high-dimensional simultaneous test for the regression parameters by applying the Gaussian approximation and multiplier bootstrap theories. We also study distributed learning and exploit the divide-and-conquer estimator to reduce computation complexity when the sample size is massive. Finally, we provide empirical results to verify the theory.