• In contrast to lattice systems where powerful numerical techniques such as matrix product state based methods are available to study the non-equilibrium dynamics, the non-equilibrium behaviour of continuum systems is much harder to simulate. We demonstrate here that Hamiltonian truncation methods can be efficiently applied to this problem, by studying the quantum quench dynamics of the 1+1 dimensional Ising field theory using a truncated free fermionic space approach. After benchmarking the method with integrable quenches corresponding to changing the mass in a free Majorana fermion field theory, we study the effect of an integrability breaking perturbation by the longitudinal magnetic field. In both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases of the model we find persistent oscillations with frequencies set by the low-lying particle excitations not only for small, but even for moderate size quenches. In the ferromagnetic phase these particles are the various non-perturbative confined bound states of the domain wall excitations, while in the paramagnetic phase the single magnon excitation governs the dynamics, allowing us to capture the time evolution of the magnetisation using a combination of known results from perturbation theory and form factor based methods. We point out that the dominance of low lying excitations allows for the numerical or experimental determination of the mass spectra through the study of the quench dynamics.
  • The scrambling of quantum information in closed many-body systems has received considerable recent attention. Two useful measures of scrambling have emerged: the spreading of initially-local operators, and the related concept of out-of-time-ordered correlation functions (OTOCs). Recently, random circuits have been used to give these quantities an effective hydrodynamical description. We extend these results by considering local random unitary circuits with a conserved U$(1)$ charge and argue, with numerical and analytical evidence, that the presence of a conservation law slows relaxation in both time ordered and time-out-of ordered correlation functions; we show that both can have a diffusively relaxing component or "power-law tail" at late times. Moreover, we consider OTOCs in Gibbs states, parametrized by a chemical potential $\mu$, and apply perturbative arguments to show that for $\mu\gg 1$ the ballistic front of information-spreading can only develop at times exponentially large in $\mu$ -- with the information traveling diffusively at earlier times. We also develop a new formalism for describing OTOCs and operator spreading, which allows us to describe the saturation of OTOCs as a form of "thermalization on operator space", and leads to a conjecture for their long-time behavior, wherein the conservation law results in a particular profile for OTOCs, showing a slow decay behind the main front. Our results may be relevant to systems with energy conservation, with the role of chemical potential played by the inverse temperature, even though our models explicitly break time translation symmetry.
  • Thermalization and scrambling are the subject of much recent study from the perspective of many-body quantum systems with locally bounded Hilbert spaces (`spin chains'), quantum field theory and holography. We tackle this problem in 1D spin-chains evolving under random local unitary circuits and prove a number of exact results on the behavior of out-of-time-ordered commutators (OTOCs), and entanglement growth in this setting. These results follow from the observation that the spreading of operators in random circuits is described by a `hydrodynamical' equation of motion, despite the fact that random unitary circuits do not have locally conserved quantities (e.g., no conserved energy). In this hydrodynamic picture quantum information travels in a front with a `butterfly velocity' $v_{\text{B}}$ that is smaller than the light cone velocity of the system, while the front itself broadens diffusively in time. The OTOC increases sharply after the arrival of the light cone, but we do \emph{not} observe a prolonged exponential regime of the form $\sim e^{\lambda_\text{L}(t-x/v)}$ for a fixed Lyapunov exponent $\lambda_\text{L}$. We find that the diffusive broadening of the front has important consequences for entanglement growth, leading to an entanglement velocity that can be significantly smaller than the butterfly velocity. We conjecture that the hydrodynamical description applies to more generic ergodic systems and support this by verifying numerically that the diffusive broadening of the operator wavefront also holds in a more traditional non-random Floquet spin-chain. We also compare our results to Clifford circuits, which have less rich hydrodynamics and consequently trivial OTOC behavior, but which can nevertheless exhibit linear entanglement growth and thermalization.
  • We show that the bulk winding number characterizing one-dimensional topological insulators with chiral symmetry can be detected from the displacement of a single particle, observed via losses. Losses represent the effect of repeated weak measurements on one sublattice only, which interrupt the dynamics periodically. When these do not detect the particle, they realize negative measurements. Our repeated measurement scheme covers both time-independent and periodically driven (Floquet) topological insulators, with or without spatial disorder. In the limit of rapidly repeated, vanishingly weak measurements, our scheme describes non-Hermitian Hamiltonians, as the lossy Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model of Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 065703 (2009). We find, contrary to intuition, that the time needed to detect the winding number can be made shorter by decreasing the efficiency of the measurement. We illustrate our results on a discrete-time quantum walk, and propose ways of testing them experimentally.
  • Quantum walks are promising for information processing tasks because on regular graphs they spread quadratically faster than random walks. Static disorder, however, can turn the tables: unlike random walks, quantum walks can suffer Anderson localization, whereby the spread of the walker stays within a finite region even in the infinite time limit. It is therefore important to understand when we can expect a quantum walk to be Anderson localized and when we can expect it to spread to infinity even in the presence of disorder. In this work we analyze the response of a generic one-dimensional quantum walk -- the split-step walk -- to different forms of static disorder. We find that introducing static, symmetry-preserving disorder in the parameters of the walk leads to Anderson localization. In the completely disordered limit, however, a delocalization sets in, and the walk spreads subdiffusively. Using an efficient numerical algorithm, we calculate the bulk topological invariants of the disordered walk, and interpret the disorder-induced Anderson localization and delocalization transitions using these invariants.