• Estimation of the number of species or unobserved classes from a random sample of the underlying population is a ubiquitous problem in statistics. In classical settings, the size of the sample is usually small. New technologies such as high-throughput DNA sequencing have allowed for the sampling of extremely large and heterogeneous populations at scales not previously attainable or even considered. New algorithms are required that take advantage of the size of the data to account for heterogeneity, but are also sufficiently fast and scale well with large data. We present a non-parametric moment-based estimator that is both computationally efficient and is sufficiently flexible to account for heterogeneity in the abundances of underlying population. This estimator is based on an extension of a popular moment-based lower bound (Chao, 1984), originally developed by Harris (1959) but unattainable due to the lack of economical algorithms to solve the system of nonlinear equation required for estimation. We apply results from the classical moment problem to show that solutions can be obtained efficiently, allowing for estimators that are simultaneously conservative and use more information. This is critical for modern genomic applications, where there may be many large experiments that require the application of species estimation. We present applications of our estimator to estimating T-Cell receptor repertoire and dropout in single cell RNA-seq experiments.
  • The statistical problem of using an initial sample to estimate the number of species in a larger sample has found important applications in fields far removed from ecology. Here we address the general problem of estimating the number of species that will be represented by at least a number r of observations in a future sample. The number r indicates species with sufficient observations, which are commonly used as a necessary condition for any robust statistical inference. We derive a procedure to construct consistent estimators that apply universally for a given population: once constructed, they can be evaluated as a simple function of r. Our approach is based on a relation between the number of species represented at least r times and the higher derivatives of the expected number of species discovered per unit of time. Combining this relation with a rational function approximation, we propose nonparametric estimators that are accurate for both large values of r and long-range extrapolations. We further show that our estimators retain asymptotic behaviors that are essential for applications on large-scale datasets. We evaluate the performance of this approach by both simulation and real data applications for inferences of the vocabulary of Shakespeare and Dickens, the topology of a Twitter social network, and molecular diversity in DNA sequencing data.