• Strong coupling is a phenomenon which occurs when the interaction between two resonance systems is so strong that the oscillatory energy exchange between them exceeds all dissipative loss channels. Each resonance can then no longer be described individually but only as a part of the coupled, hybrid system. Here, we show that strong coupling can occur in a deep subwavelength nanofilm supporting an epsilon near zero mode which is integrated into a metal-insulator-metal gap plasmon structure. To generate an epsilon near zero mode resonance in the short-wave infrared region, an indium tin oxide nanofilm of ~lambda/100 thickness is used. A polariton splitting value of 27%, corresponding to a normalized coupling rate of 0.135, is experimentally demonstrated. Simulations indicate that much larger coupling rates, well within the ultra-strong regime where the energy exchange rate is comparable with the frequency of light, are possible.
  • We present a new approach to dielectric metasurface design that relies on a single resonator per unit cell and produces robust, high quality-factor Fano resonances. Our approach utilizes symmetry breaking of highly symmetric resonator geoemetries, such as cubes, to induce couplings between the otherwise orthogonal resonator modes. In particular, we design perturbations that couple "bright" dipole modes to "dark" dipole modes whose radiative decay is suppressed by local field effects in the array. Our approach is widely scalable from the near-infrared to radio frequencies. We first unravel the Fano resonance behavior through numerical simulations of a germanium resonator-based metasurface that achieved a quality-factor of ~1300 at ~10.8 um. Then, we present two experimental demonstrations operating in the near-infrared (~1 um): a silicon-based implementation that achieved a quality-factor of ~350; and a gallium arsenide-based structure that achieves a quality-factor of ~600 - the highest near-infrared quality-factor experimentally demonstrated to date with this kind of metasurfaces. Importantly, large electromagnetic field enhancements appear within the resonators at the Fano resonant frequencies. We envision that combining high-quality factor, high field enhancement resonances with nonlinear and active/gain materials such as gallium arsenide will lead to new classes of active optical devices.
  • We demonstrate an unexpectedly strong surface-plasmonic absorption at the interface of silver and high-index dielectrics based on electron and photon spectroscopy. The measured bandwidth and intensity of absorption deviate significantly from the classical theory. Our density-functional calculation well predicts the occurrence of this phenomenon. It reveals that due to the low metal-to-dielectric work function at such interfaces, conduction electrons can display a drastic quantum spillover, causing the interfacial electron-hole pair production to dominate the decay of surface plasmons. This finding can be of fundamental importance in understanding and designing quantum nano-plasmonic devices that utilize noble metals and high-index dielectrics.
  • The optical nonlocality in symmetric metal-dielectric multilayer metamaterials is theoretically and experimentally investigated with respect to transverse-magnetic-polarized incident light. A nonlocal effective medium theory is derived from the transfer-matrix method to determine the nonlocal effective permittivity depending on both the frequency and wave vector in a symmetric metal-dielectric multilayer stack. In contrast to the local effective medium theory, our proposed nonlocal effective medium theory can accurately predict measured incident angle-dependent reflection spectra from a fabricated multilayer stack and provide nonlocal dispersion relations. Moreover, the bulk plasmon polaritons with large wave vectors supported in the multilayer stack are also investigated with the nonlocal effective medium theory through the analysis of the dispersion relation and eigenmode.
  • We employ both the effective medium approximation (EMA) and Bloch theory to compare the dispersion properties of semiconductor hyperbolic metamaterials (SHMs) at mid-infrared frequencies and metallic hyperbolic metamaterials (MHMs) at visible frequencies. This analysis reveals the conditions under which the EMA can be safely applied for both MHMs and SHMs. We find that the combination of precise nanoscale layering and the longer infrared operating wavelengths puts the SHMs well within the effective medium limit and, in contrast to MHMs, allows the attainment of very high photon momentum states. In addition, SHMs allow for new phenomena such as ultrafast creation of the hyperbolic manifold through optical pumping. In particular, we examine the possibility of achieving ultrafast topological transitions through optical pumping which can photo-dope appropriately designed quantum wells on the femtosecond time scale.
  • We experimentally demonstrate efficient third harmonic generation from an indium tin oxide (ITO) nanofilm (lambda/42 thick) on a glass substrate for a pump wavelength of 1.4 um. A conversion efficiency of 3.3x10^-6 is achieved by exploiting the field enhancement properties of the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode with an enhancement factor of 200. This nanoscale frequency conversion method is applicable to other plasmonic materials and reststrahlen materials in proximity of the longitudinal optical phonon frequencies.
  • We experimentally demonstrate single beam directional perfect absorption (to within experimental accuracy) of p-polarized light in the near-infrared using unpatterned, deep subwavelength films of indium tin oxide (ITO) on Ag. The experimental perfect absorption occurs slightly above the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) frequency of ITO where the permittivity is less than one. Remarkably, we obtain perfect absorption for films whose thickness is as low as ~1/50th of the operating free-space wavelength and whose single pass attenuation is only ~ 5%. We further derive simple analytical conditions for perfect absorption in the subwavelength-film regime that reveal the constraints that the ITO permittivity must satisfy if perfect absorption is to be achieved. Then, to get a physical insight on the perfect absorption properties, we analyze the eigenmodes of the layered structure by computing both the real-frequency/complex-wavenumber and the complex-frequency/real-wavenumber modal dispersion diagrams. These analyses allow us to attribute the experimental perfect absorption behavior to the crossover between bound and leaky behavior of one eigenmode of the layered structure. Both modal methods show that perfect absorption occurs at a frequency slightly larger than the ENZ frequency, in agreement with experimental results, and both methods predict a second perfect absorption condition at higher frequencies attributed to another crossover between bound and leaky behavior of the same eigenmode. Our results greatly expand the list of materials that can be considered for use as ultrathin perfect absorbers and also provide a methodology for the design of absorber systems at any desired frequency.