• The sporadic accretion following the tidal disruption of a star by a super-massive black hole (TDE) leads to a bright UV and soft X-ray flare in the galactic nucleus. The gas and dust surrounding the black hole responses to such a flare with an echo in emission lines and infrared emission. In this paper, we report the detection of long fading mid-IR emission lasting up to 14 years after the flare in four TDE candidates with transient coronal lines using the WISE public data release. We estimate that the reprocessed mid-IR luminosities are in the range between $4\times 10^{42}$ and $2\times 10^{43}$ erg~s$^{-1}$ and dust temperature in the range of 570-800K when WISE first detected these sources three to five years after the flare. Both luminosity and dust temperature decreases with time. We interpret the mid-IR emission as the infrared echo of the tidal disruption flare. We estimate the UV luminosity at the peak flare to be 1 to 30 times $10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and for warm dust masses to be in the range of 0.05-1.3 Msun within a few parsecs. Our results suggest that the mid-infrared echo is a general signature of TDE in the gas-rich environment.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • We present an analysis of spectrum and variability of the bright reddened narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy Was~61 using 90 ks archival {\it XMM-Newton} data. The X-ray spectrum in 0.2-10 keV can be characterized by an absorbed power-law plus soft excess and an Fe K$\alpha$ emission line. The power-law spectral index remains constant during the flux variation. The absorbing material is mildly ionized, with a column density of 3.2$\times$10$^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$, and does not appear to vary during the period of the X-ray observation. If the same material causes the optical reddening (E(B-V)$\simeq$0.6 mag), it must be located outside the narrow line region with a dust-to-gas ratio similar to the average Galactic value. We detect significant variations of the Fe K$\alpha$ line during the observational period. A broad Fe K$\alpha$ line at $\simeq$6.7 keV with a width of $\sim$0.6 keV is detected in the low flux segment of the first 40 ks exposure, and is absent in the spectra of other segments; a narrow Fe K$\alpha$ emission line $\sim$6.4 keV with a width of $\sim$0.1 keV is observed in the subsequent 20 ks segment, which has a count rate of 35% higher and is in the next day. We believe this is due to the change in geometry and kinematics of the X-ray emitting corona. The temperature and flux of soft X-ray excess appear to correlate with the flux of the hard power-law component. Comptonization of disc photons by a warm and optically thick inner disk is preferred to interpret the soft excess, rather than the ionized reflection.
  • Neutral Helium multiplets, HeI*3189,3889,10830 are very useful diagnostics to the geometry and physical conditions of the absorbing gas in quasars. So far only a handful of HeI* detections have been reported. Using a newly developed method, we detected HeI*3889 absorption line in 101 sources of a well-defined sample of 285 MgII BAL quasars selected from the SDSS DR5. This has increased the number of HeI* BAL quasars by more than one order of magnitude. We further detected HeI*3189 in 50% (52/101) quasars in the sample. The detection fraction of HeI* BALs in MgII BAL quasars is about 35% as a whole, and increases dramatically with increasing spectral signal-to-noise ratios, from 18% at S/N <= 10 to 93% at S/N >= 35. This suggests that HeI* BALs could be detected in most MgII LoBAL quasars, provided spectra S/N is high enough. Such a surprisingly high HeI* BAL fraction is actually predicted from photo-ionization calculations based on a simple BAL model. The result indicates that HeI* absorption lines can be used to search for BAL quasars at low-z, which cannot be identified by ground-based optical spectroscopic survey with commonly seen UV absorption lines. Using HeI*3889, we discovered 19 BAL quasars at z<0.3 from available SDSS spectral database. The fraction of HeI* BAL quasars is similar to that of LoBAL objects.
  • LAMOST has released more than two million spectra, which provide the opportunity to search for double-peaked narrow emission line (NEL) galaxies and AGNs. The double-peaked narrow-line profiles can be well modeled by two velocity components, respectively blueshifted and redshifted with respect to the systemic recession velocity. This paper presents 20 double-peaked NEL galaxies and AGNs found from LAMOST DR1 using a search method based on multi-gaussian fit of the narrow emission lines. Among them, 10 have already been published by other authors, either listed as genuine double-peaked NEL objects or as asymmetric NEL objects, the remaining 10 being first discoveries. We discuss some possible origins for double-peaked narrow-line features, as interaction between jet and narrow line regions, interaction with companion galaxies and black hole binaries. Spatially resolved optical imaging and/or follow-up observations in other spectral bands are needed to further discuss the physical mechanisms at work.
  • By combining the newly infrared photometric data from the All-Sky Data Release of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with the spectroscopic data from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we study the covering factor of warm dust ($\CF$) for a large quasar sample, as well as the relations between $\CF$ and other physical parameters of quasars. We find a strong correlation between the flux ratio of mid-infrared to near-ultraviolet and the slope of near-ultraviolet spectra, which is interpreted as the dust extinction effect. After correcting for the dust extinction utilizing the above correlation, we examine the relations between $\CF$ and AGN properties: bolometric luminosity ($\Lbol$), black hole mass ($\MBH$) and Eddington ratio ($L/L_{\rm Edd}$). We confirm the anti-correlation between $\CF$ and $\Lbol$. Further we find that $\CF$ is anti-correlated with $\MBH$, but is independent of $L/L_{\rm Edd}$. Radio-loud quasars are found to follow the same correlations as for radio-quiet quasars. Monte Carlo simulations show that the anisotropy of UV-optical continuum of the accretion disc can significantly affect, but is less likely to dominate the $\CF$--$\Lbol$ correlation.
  • (Abridged for arXiv) We report the discovery of an unusual, extremely dust-rich and metal-strong damped \lya absorption system (DLA) at a redshift $z_{a}=2.4596$ toward the quasar SDSS J115705.52+615521.7 (hereafter J1157+6155) with an emission-line redshift $z_{e}=2.5125$. Its neutral hydrogen column density $N_{\hi} = 10^{21.8\pm0.2}$ cm$^{-2}$ is among the highest values measured in quasar DLAs. The measured metal column density is $N_{ZnII}\approx 10^{13.8}$ cm$^{-2}$, which is about 1.5 times larger than the largest value in any previously observed quasar DLAs. The best-fit curve is a MW-like law with a significant broad feature centered around 2175 {\AA} in the rest frame of the absorber. The measured extinction $A_V \approx 0.92$ mag is unprecedentedly high in quasar DLAs. After applying an extinction correction, the $i$ band absolute magnitude of the quasar is as high as $M_{i} \approx -29.4$ mag, placing it one of the most luminous quasars ever known. This discovery is suggestive of the existence of a rare yet important population of dust-rich DLAs with both high metallicities and high column densities, which may have significant impact on the measurement of the cosmic evolution of neutral gas mass density and metallicity.
  • Using newly released data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we report the discovery of rapid infrared variability in three radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) selected from the 23 sources in the sample of Yuan et al. (2008). J0849+5108 and J0948+0022 clearly show intraday variability, while J1505+0326 has a longer measurable time scale within 180 days. Their variability amplitudes, corrected for measurement errors, are $\sim 0.1-0.2$ mag. The detection of intraday variability restricts the size of the infrared-emitting region to $\sim 10^{-3}$ pc, significantly smaller than the scale of the torus but consistent with the base of a jet. The three variable sources are exceptionally radio-loud, have the highest radio brightness temperature among the whole sample, and all show detected $\gamma$-ray emission in Fermi/LAT observations. Their spectral energy distributions resemble those of low-energy-peaked blazars, with a synchrotron peak around infrared wavelengths. This result strongly confirms the view that at least some radio-loud NLS1s are blazars with a relativistic jet close to our line of sight. The beamed synchrotron emission from the jet contributes significantly to and probably dominates the spectra in the infrared and even optical bands.
  • Variable super-strong coronal emission lines were observed in one galaxy, SDSS J095209.56+214313.3, and their origin remains controversy. In this paper, we report the detection of variable broad spectral bumps, reminiscent of supernova (SN) II-Plateau (II-P) spectra taken a few days after the shock breakout, in the second galaxy with variable super-strong coronal lines, SDSS J074820.67+471214.3. The coronal line spectrum shows unprecedented high ionization with strong [Fe X], [Fe XI], [Fe XIV], [S XII] and [Ar XIV], but without detectable optical [Fe VII] lines. The coronal line luminosities are similar to that observed in bright Seyfert galaxies, and 20 times more luminous than that reported in the hottest Type IIn SN 2005ip. The coronal lines ($\sigma ~120-240$ km s-1) are much broader than the narrow lines ($\sigma \sim 40$ km/s) from the star forming regions in the galaxy, but at nearly the same systematic redshift. We also detected a variable non-stellar continuum in optical and UV. In the follow-up spectra taken 4-5 years later, the coronal lines, SN-like feature, and non-stellar continuum disappeared, while the [O III] intensity increased by about a factor of ten. Our analysis suggests that the coronal line region should be at least ten light days in size, and be powered either by a quasi-steady ionizing source with a soft X-ray luminosity at least a few 10^{42} erg s-1 or by a very luminous soft X-ray outburst. These findings can be more naturally explained by a star tidally disrupted by the central black hole than by an SN explosion.
  • We present a sample of 68 low-z MgII low-ionization broad absorption-line (loBAL) quasars. The sample is uniformly selected from the SDSS5 according to the following criteria: (1) 0.4<z<0.8, (2) median S/N>7, and (3) MgII absorption-line width > 1600 \kms. The last criterion is a trade-off between the completeness and consistency with respect to the canonical definition of BAL quasars that have the `balnicity index' BI>0 in CIV BAL. We adopted such a criterion to ensure that ~90% of our sample are classical BAL quasars and the completeness is ~80%, based on extensive tests using high-z quasar samples with measurements of both CIV and MgII BALs. We found (1) MgII BAL is more frequently detected in quasars with narrower Hbeta emission-line, weaker [OIII] emission-line, stronger optical FeII multiplets and higher luminosity. In term of fundamental physical parameters of a black hole accretion system, loBAL fraction is significantly higher in quasars with a higher Eddington ratio than those with a lower Eddington ratio. The fraction is not dependent on the black hole mass in the range concerned. The overall fraction distribution is broad, suggesting a large range of covering factor of the absorption material. (2) [OIII]-weak loBAL quasars averagely show undetected [NeV] emission line and a very small line ratio of [NeV] to [OIII]. However, the line ratio in non-BAL quasars, which is much larger than that in [OIII]-weak loBAL quasars, is independent of the strength of the [OIII] line. (3) loBAL and non-loBAL quasars have similar colors in near-infrared to optical band but different colors in ultraviolet. (4) Quasars with MgII absorption lines of intermediate width are indistinguishable from the non-loBAL quasars in optical emission line properties but their colors are similar to loBAL quasars, redder than non-BAL quasars. We also discuss the implication of these results.
  • In the unification scheme, narrow-lined (type 2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) are intrinsically similar to broad-lined (type 1) AGN with the exception that the line of sight to the broad emission line region and accretion disk is blocked by a dusty torus. The fraction of type 1 AGN measures the average covering factor of the torus. In this paper, we explore the dependence of this fraction on nuclear properties for a sample of low redshift (z <0.35) radio strong (P_{1.4GHz} >10^{23}W/Hz) AGN selected by matching the spectroscopic catalog of Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the radio source catalog of Faint Image of Radio Sky at Twenty cm. After correcting for several selection effects, we find that : (1) type 1 fraction $f_1$ keeps at a constant of ~20 per cent in the [O III] 5007 luminosity range of 40.7< log(L_{[O III]}/ erg/s) <43.5 . This result is significantly different from previous studies, and the difference can be explained by extinction correction and different treatment of selection effects. (2) $f_1$ rises with black hole mass from ~20 per cent (M_bh below 10^8 Msun) to ~30 per cent (M_bh above that). This coincides with the decrease of the fraction of highly-inclined disk galaxies with black hole mass, implying a population of Seyfert galaxies seen as type 2 due to galaxy-scale obscuration in disk when the host galaxy type transfer from bulge-dominant to disk-dominant. (3) $f_1$ is independent of the Eddington ratio for its value between 0.01 and 1; (4) $f_1$ ascends from 15 per cent to 30 per cent in the radio power range of 23< log(P_{1.4GHz}/ W/Hz) <24, then remain a constant at ~30 per cent up to 10^{26} W/Hz.
  • We present a new model to explain the appearance of red/blue-shifted broad low-ionization emission lines, especially emission lines in optical band, which is commonly considered as an indicator of radial motion of the line emitting gas in broad emission line regions (BLRs) of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We show that partly obscured disk-like BLRs of dbp emitters (AGN with double-peak broad low-ionization emission lines) can also successfully produce shifted standard Gaussian broad balmer emission lines. Then we calculate two kinds of BH masses for AGN with shifted broad balmer emission lines selected from SDSS. We find that the BH masses calculated from M-sigma relation are systematically larger than virial BH masses for the selected objects, even after the correction of internal reddening effects in BLRs. The smaller virial BH masses than BH masses from M-sigma relation for objects with shifted broad emission lines are coincident with what we expect from the partly obscured accretion disk model. Thus, we provide an optional better model to explain the appearance of shifted broad emission lines, especially for those objects with underestimated virial BH masses.
  • Double peaked broad emission lines in active galactic nuclei are generally considered to be formed in an accretion disc. In this paper, we compute the profiles of reprocessing emission lines from a relativistic, warped accretion disc around a black hole in order to explore the possibility that certain asymmetries in the double-peaked emission line profile which can not be explained by a circular Keplerian disc may be induced by disc warping. The disc warping also provides a solution for the energy budget in the emission line region because it increases the solid angle of the outer disc portion subtended to the inner portion of the disc. We adopted a parametrized disc geometry and a central point-like source of ionizing radiation to capture the main characteristics of the emission line profile from such discs. We find that the ratio between the blue and red peaks of the line profiles becoming less than unity can be naturally predicted by a twisted warped disc, and a third peak can be produced in some cases. We show that disc warping can reproduce the main features of multi-peaked line profiles of four active galactic nuclei from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.
  • We present Fe Kalpha line profiles from and images of relativistic discs with finite thickness around a rotating black hole using a novel code. The line is thought to be produced by iron fluorescence of a relatively cold X-ray illuminated material in the innermost parts of the accretion disc and provides an excellent diagnostic of accretion flows in the vicinity of black holes. Previous studies have concentrated on the case of a thin, Keplerian accretion disc. This disc must become thicker and sub-Keplerian with increasing accretion rates. These can affect the line profiles and in turn can influence the estimation of the accretion disc and black hole parameters from the observed line profiles. We here embark on, for the first time, a fully relativistic computation which offers key insights into the effects of geometrical thickness and the sub-Keplerian orbital velocity on the line profiles. We include all relativistic effects such as frame-dragging, Doppler boost, time dilation, gravitational redshift and light bending. We find that the separation and the relative height between the blue and red peaks of the line profile diminish as the thickness of the disc increases. This code is also well-suited to produce accretion disc images. We calculate the redshift and flux images of the accretion disc and find that the observed image of the disc strongly depends on the inclination angle. The self-shadowing effect appears remarkable for a high inclination angle, and leads to the black hole shadow being completely hidden by the disc itself.
  • In this paper, we present a correlation between the spectral index distribution (SED) and the dimensionless accretion rate defined as $\dot{m}={L_{bol}/L_{Edd}}$ for AGN. This quantity is used as a substitute of the physical accretion rate. We select 193 AGN with both broad H$\alpha$ and broad H$\beta$, and with absorption lines near MgI$\lambda5175\AA$ from SDSS DR4. We determine the spectral index and dimensionless accretion rate after correcting for both host galaxy contribution and internal reddening effects. A correlation is found between the optical spectral index and the dimensionless accretion rate for AGN, including low luminosity AGN ($L_{H\alpha}<10^{41}{\rm erg\cdot s^{-1}}$ sometimes called "dwarf AGN" (Ho et al. 1997)). The existence of this correlation provides an independent method to estimate the central BH masses for all types of AGN. We also find that there is a different correlation between the spectral index and the BH masses for normal AGN and low luminosity AGN, which is perhaps due to the different accretion modes in these two types of nuclei. This in turn may lead to the different correlations between BH masses and optical continuum luminosity reported previously (Zhang et al. 2007a), which invalidates the application of the empirical relationship found by Kaspi et al. (2000, 2005) to low luminosity AGN in order to determine their BLR sizes.
  • We present a new code for calculating the Fe Kalpha line profiles from relativistic accretion disks with finite thickness around a rotating black hole. The thin Keplerian accretion disk must become thicker and sub-Keplerian with increasing accretion rates. We here embark on, for the first time, a fully relativistic computation which is aimed at gaining an insight into the effects of geometrical thickness and the sub-Keplerian orbital velocity on the line profiles. This code is also well-suited to produce accretion disk images.
  • In this paper we study the object SDSS J1130+0058 which is the only AGN known to have both double-peaked low-ionization broad emission lines, and also X-shaped radio structures. Emission from an accretion disk can reproduce the double-peaked line profile of broad H$\alpha$, but not the radio structure. Under the accretion disk model, the period of the inner emission line region is about 230 years. Using a new method to subtract the stellar component from the data of the SDSS DR4, we obtain an internal reddening factor which is less than previously found. The implied smaller amount of dust disfavors the backflow model for the X-shaped radio structure. The presence of a Binary Black Hole (BBH) system is the most natural way to explain ${\it both}$ the optical and radio properties of this AGN. Under the assumption of the BBH model, we can estimate the BBH system has a separation of less than 0.04 pc with a period less than 59 years, this may pose some problem to the BLRs sizes, still we conclude that the BBH model is favored on the basis of the present limited information.
  • In this paper, the sizes of the BLRs and BH masses of DouBle-Peaked broad low-ionization emission line emitters (dbp emitters) are compared using different methods: virial BH masses vs BH masses from stellar velocity dispersions, the size of BLRs from the continuum luminosity vs the size of BLRs from the accretion disk model. First, the virial BH masses of dbp emitters estimated by the continumm luminosity and line width of broad H$\beta$ are about six times (a much larger value, if including another dbp emitters, of which the stellar velocity dispersions are traced by the line widths of narrow emission lines) larger than the BH masses estimated from the relation $M_{BH} - \sigma$ which is a more accurate relation to estimate BH masses. Second, the sizes of the BLRs of dbp emitters estimated by the empirical relation of $R_{BLR} - L_{5100\AA}$ are about three times (a much larger value, if including another dbp emitters, of which the stellar velocity dispersions are traced by the line widths of narrow emission lines) larger than the mean flux-weighted sizes of BLRs of dbp emitters estimated by the accretion disk model. The higher electron density of BLRs of dbp emitters would be the main reason which leads to smaller size of BLRs than the predicted value from the continuum luminosity.
  • We present an analysis of the emission line property and the broad band spectral energy distribution of the ultra-luminous infrared Type II quasar Q132+058. The optical and ultraviolet emission lines show four distinct components: a LINER-like component at the systematic velocity, a heavily reddened HII-like component blueshifted by about 400 km/s, and two broad components blueshifted by about 400 km/s and 1900 km/s, respectively. The emission line ratios suggest that broad components are produced in dense and alpha-enriched outflows with a metalicity of 3-5 Zsun and a density of n_H ~ 10^7 cm^-3. The optical--UV continuum is dominated by stellar light and can be modeled with a young (<1 Myr) plus an intermediate age (0.5-0.8Gyr) stellar populations. The near to mid-infrared light is dominated by hot and warm dust heated by the hidden quasar. We derive a star formation rate (SFR) of 300-500 M\sun yr$^{-1}$ from the UV spectrum and far-infrared luminosity, which is two orders of magnitude larger than that indicated by reddening uncorrected [OII] luminosity.
  • Polarization is a useful probe to investigate the geometries and dynamics of outflow in BAL QSOs. We perform a Monte-Carlo simulation to calculate the polarization produced by resonant and electron scattering in BALR. We find: 1)A rotated and funnel-shaped outflow is preferred to explain many observed polarization features. 2)The resonant scattering can contribute a significant part of NV emission line in some QSOs.
  • We study the FeII properties of double-peaked broad low-ionization emission line AGN (dbp emitters) using a sample of 27 dbp emitters from SDSS (DR4), with mean value $\sigma_{H\alpha_{B}}\sim3002\pm139{\rm km\cdot s^{-1}}$. Our first result is that the line spectra in the wavelength range from 4100$\AA$ to 5800$\AA$ can be best fitted by an elliptical accretion disk model, assuming the same double-peaked line profiles for H$\beta$, FeII, H$\gamma$ and HeII$\lambda4686\AA$ as that of double-peaked broad H$\alpha$ for all the 27 dbp emitters, except the object SDSS J2125-0813 which we have discussed in a previous paper. The best fitted results indicate that the optical FeII emission lines of dbp emitters originate from the same region in the accretion disk where the double-peaked Balmer emission lines originate. Some correlations between FeII emission lines and the other broad emission lines for normal AGN can be confirmed for dbp emitters. However, these results should be taken with caution due to the small number of objects and the bias in selecting strong FeII emitters. We show that for dbp emitters, BH masses seems to have more influence on FeII properties than dimensionless accretion rate. We also find that the dbp emitters in the sample are all radio quiet quasars except one dbp emitter with $R_r> 1$ according to the definition by Ivezi$\rm{\acute{c}}$ et al. (2002) and 6 objects undiscovered by FIRST.
  • Recent works showed that the absorbing material in broad absorption line (BAL) quasars is optically thick to major resonant absorption lines. This material may contribute significantly to the polarization in the absorption lines. In this paper, we present a detailed study of the resonant line scattering process using Monte-Carlo method to constrain the optical depth, the geometry and the kinematics of BAL Region (BALR). By comparing our results with observed polarized spectra of BAL quasars, we find: (1) Resonant scattering can produce polarization up to 9% at the absorption trough for doublet transitions and up to 20% for singlet transitions in radially accelerated flows. To explain the large polarization degree in the CIV, NV absorption line troughs detected in a small fraction of BAL QSOs, a nonmonotonic velocity distribution along the line of sight or/and additional contribution from the electron scattering region is required. (2) The rotation of the flow can lead to the rotation of the polarization position angle (PA) in the line trough. Large extending angle of BALR is required to produce the observed large PA rotation in a few BAL QSOs. (3) A large extending angle of BALR is required to explain a sub-trough in the polarized flux that was observed in a number of BAL QSOs. (4) The resonant-scattering can contribute a significant part of NV emission line in some QSOs, and may give rise to anomalous strong NV lines in these quasars. (5) The polarized flux and PA rotation produced by the resonant scattering in non-BAL is uniquely asymmetric, which may be used to test the presence of BALR in non-BAL QSOs.
  • The double-peaked broad emission lines are usually thought to be linked to accretion disks, however, the local viscous heating in the line-emitting disk portion is usually insufficient for the observed double-peaked broad-line luminosity in most sources. Our calculations show that only a small fraction (< 2.3 per cent) of the radiation from the RIAF in the inner region of the disk can photo-ionize the line-emitting disk portion, because the solid angle of the outer disk portion subtended to the inner region of the RIAF is too small. We propose that only those AGNs with sufficient matter above the disk (slowly moving jets or outflows) can scatter enough photons radiated from the inner disk region to the outer line-emitting disk portion. Our model predicts a power-law r-dependent line emissivity with an index ~2.5, which is consistent with \beta~2-3 required by the model fittings for double-peaked line profiles. Using a sample of radio-loud double-peaked line emitters, we show that the outer disk regions can be efficiently illuminated by the photons scattered from the electron-positron jets with \gamma_j<2. It is consistent with the fact that no double-peaked emission line is present in strong radio quasars with relativistic jets. For radio-quiet counterparts, slow outflows with Thomson scattering depth ~0.2 can scatter sufficient photons to the line-emitting regions. This model can therefore solve the energy budget problem for double-peaked line emitters.
  • It is widely accepted that the broad absorption line region (BALR) exists in most (if not all) quasars with a small covering factor. Recent works showed that the BALR is optically thick to soft and even medium energy X-rays, with a typical hydrogen column density of a few 10$^{23}$ to $>$ 10$^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$. The electron scattering in the thick absorber might contribute significantly to the observed continuum polarization for both BAL QSOs and non-BAL QSOs. In this paper, we present a detailed study of the electron scattering in the BALR by assuming an equatorial and axisymmetric outflow model. Monte-Carlo simulations are performed to correct the effect of the radiative transfer. Assuming an average covering factor of 0.2 of the BALR, which is consistent with observations, we find the electron scattering in the BALR with a column density of $\sim$ 4 $\times$ 10$^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$ can successfully produce the observed average continuum polarization for both BAL QSOs and non-BAL QSOs. The observed distribution of the continuum polarization of radio quiet quasars (for both BAL QSOs and non-BAL QSOs) is used to constrain the dispersal distribution of the BALR. We find that, to match the observations, the maximum continuum polarization produced by the BALR (while viewed edge-on) peaks at $P$ = 0.34%, which is much smaller than the average continuum polarization of BAL QSOs ($P$ = 0.93%). The discrepancy can be explained by a selection bias that the BAL with larger covering factor, and thus producing larger continuum polarization, is more likely to be detected. A larger sample of radio quiet quasars with accurate measurement of the continuum polarization will give better constraints to the distribution of the BALR properties.
  • We have found a NLS1 nucleus in the extensively studied eruptive BL Lac, 0846+51W1, out of a large sample of NLS1 compiled from the spectroscopic dataset of SDSS DR1. Its optical spectrum can be well decomposed into three components, a power law component from the relativistic jet, a stellar component from the host galaxy, and a component from a typical NLS1 nucleus. The emission line properties of 0846+51W1, FWHM(Hbeta) ~ 1710 km s^-1 and [OIII]5007/Hbeta ~ 0.32 when it was in faint state, fulfil the conventional definition of NLS1. Strong FeII emission is detected in the SDSS spectrum, which is also typical of NLS1s. We try to estimate its central black hole mass using various techniques and find that 0846+51W1 is very likely emitting at a few times 10% L_Edd. We speculate that Seyfert-like nuclei, including NLS1s, might be concealed in a significant fraction of BL Lacs but have not been sufficiently explored due to the fact that, by definition, the optical-UV continuum of such kind of objects are often overwhelmed by the synchrotron emission.