• Chiral crystals are materials whose lattice structure has a well-defined handedness due to the lack of inversion, mirror, or other roto-inversion symmetries. These crystals represent a broad, important class of quantum materials; their structural chirality has been found to allow for a wide range of phenomena in condensed matter physics, including skyrmions in chiral magnets, unconventional pairing in chiral superconductors, nonlocal transport and unique magnetoelectric effects in chiral metals, as well as enantioselective photoresponse. Nevertheless, while these phenomena have been intensely investigated, the topological electronic properties of chiral crystals have still remained largely uncharacterized. While recent theoretical advances have shown that the presence of crystalline symmetries can protect novel band crossings in 2D and 3D systems, we present a new class of Weyl fermions enforced by the absence of particular crystal symmetries. These "Kramers-Weyl" fermions are a universal topological electronic property of all nonmagnetic chiral crystals with spin-orbit coupling (SOC); they are guaranteed by lattice translation, structural chirality, and time-reversal symmetry, and unlike conventional Weyl fermions, appear at time-reversal-invariant momenta (TRIMs). We cement this finding by identifying representative chiral materials in the majority of the 65 chiral space groups in which Kramers-Weyl fermions are relevant to low-energy physics. By combining our analysis with the results of previous works, we determine that all point-like nodal degeneracies in nonmagnetic chiral crystals with relevant SOC carry nontrivial Chern numbers. We further show that, beyond the previous phenomena allowed by structural chirality, Kramers-Weyl fermions enable unusual phenomena, such as a novel electron spin texture, chiral bulk Fermi surfaces over large energy windows.
  • Three-dimensional topological (crystalline) insulators are materials with an insulating bulk, but conducting surface states which are topologically protected by time-reversal (or spatial) symmetries. Here, we extend the notion of three-dimensional topological insulators to systems that host no gapless surface states, but exhibit topologically protected gapless hinge states. Their topological character is protected by spatio-temporal symmetries, of which we present two cases: (1) Chiral higher-order topological insulators protected by the combination of time-reversal and a four-fold rotation symmetry. Their hinge states are chiral modes and the bulk topology is $\mathbb{Z}_2$-classified. (2) Helical higher-order topological insulators protected by time-reversal and mirror symmetries. Their hinge states come in Kramers pairs and the bulk topology is $\mathbb{Z}$-classified. We provide the topological invariants for both cases. Furthermore we show that SnTe as well as surface-modified Bi$_2$TeI, BiSe, and BiTe are helical higher-order topological insulators and propose a realistic experimental setup to detect the hinge states.
  • We study the entanglement entropy of gapped phases of matter in three spatial dimensions. We focus in particular on size-independent contributions to the entropy across entanglement surfaces of arbitrary topologies. We show that for low energy fixed-point theories, the constant part of the entanglement entropy across any surface can be reduced to a linear combination of the entropies across a sphere and a torus. We first derive our results using strong sub-additivity inequalities along with assumptions about the entanglement entropy of fixed-point models, and identify the topological contribution by considering the renormalization group flow; in this way we give an explicit definition of topological entanglement entropy $S_{\mathrm{topo}}$ in (3+1)D, which sharpens previous results. We illustrate our results using several concrete examples and independent calculations, and show adding "twist" terms to the Lagrangian can change $S_{\mathrm{topo}}$ in (3+1)D. For the generalized Walker-Wang models, we find that the ground state degeneracy on a 3-torus is given by $\exp(-3S_{\mathrm{topo}}[T^2])$ in terms of the topological entanglement entropy across a 2-torus. We conjecture that a similar relationship holds for Abelian theories in $(d+1)$ dimensional spacetime, with the ground state degeneracy on the $d$-torus given by $\exp(-dS_{\mathrm{topo}}[T^{d-1}])$.
  • Entanglement properties are routinely used to characterize phases of quantum matter in theoretical computations. For example the spectrum of the reduced density matrix, or so-called "entanglement spectrum", has become a widely used diagnostic for universal topological properties of quantum phases. However, while being convenient to calculate theoretically, it is notoriously hard to measure in experiments. Here we use the IBM quantum computer to make the first ever measurement of the entanglement spectrum of a symmetry-protected topological state. We are able to distinguish its entanglement spectrum from those we measure for trivial and long-range ordered states.
  • The mathematical field of topology has become a framework to describe the low-energy electronic structure of crystalline solids. A typical feature of a bulk insulating three-dimensional topological crystal are conducting two-dimensional surface states. This constitutes the topological bulk-boundary correspondence. Here, we establish that the electronic structure of bismuth, an element consistently described as bulk topologically trivial, is in fact topological and follows a generalized bulk-boundary correspondence of higher-order: not the surfaces of the crystal, but its hinges host topologically protected conducting modes. These hinge modes are protected against localization by time-reversal symmetry locally, and globally by the three-fold rotational symmetry and inversion symmetry of the bismuth crystal. We support our claim theoretically and experimentally. Our theoretical analysis is based on symmetry arguments, topological indices, first-principle calculations, and the recently introduced framework of topological quantum chemistry. We provide supporting evidence from two complementary experimental techniques. With scanning-tunneling spectroscopy, we probe the unique signatures of the rotational symmetry of the one-dimensional states located at step edges of the crystal surface. With Josephson interferometry, we demonstrate their universal topological contribution to the electronic transport. Our work establishes bismuth as a higher-order topological insulator.
  • Weyl semimetals are novel topological conductors that host Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles. While the Weyl fermions in high-energy physics are strictly defined as the massless solution of the Dirac equation and uniquely fixed by Lorentz symmetry, there is no such constraint for a topological metal in general. Specifically, the Weyl quasiparticles can arise by breaking either the space-inversion ($\mathcal{I}$) or time-reversal ($\mathcal{T}$) symmetry. They can either respect Lorentz symmetry (type-I) or strongly violate it (type-II). To date, different types of Weyl fermions have been predicted to occur only in different classes of materials. In this paper, we present a significant materials breakthrough by identifying a large class of Weyl materials in the RAlX (R=Rare earth, Al, X=Ge, Si) family that can realize all different types of emergent Weyl fermions ($\mathcal{I}$-breaking, $\mathcal{T}$-breaking, type-I or type-II), depending on a suitable choice of the rare earth elements. Specifically, RAlX can be ferromagnetic, nonmagnetic or antiferromagnetic and the electronic band topology and topological nature of the Weyl fermions can be tuned. The unparalleled tunability and the large number of compounds make the RAlX family of compounds a unique Weyl semimetal class for exploring the wide-ranging topological phenomena associated with different types of emergent Weyl fermions in transport, spectroscopic and device-based experiments.
  • The Hofstadter model describes non-interacting fermions on a lattice in the presence of an external magnetic field. Motivated by the plethora of solid-state phases emerging from electron interactions, we consider an interacting version of the Hofstadter model including a Hubbard repulsion U. We investigate this model in the large-U limit corresponding to a t-J Hamiltonian with an external (orbital) magnetic field. By using renormalized mean field theory supplemented by exact diagonalization calculations of small clusters, we find evidence for competing symmetry-breaking phases, exhibiting (possibly co-existing) charge, bond and superconducting orders. Topological properties of the states are also investigated and some of our results are compared to related experiments involving ultra-cold atoms loaded on optical lattices in the presence of a synthetic gauge field.
  • We study a layered three-dimensional heterostructure in which two types of Kondo insulators are stacked alternatingly. One of them is the topological Kondo insulator SmB 6 , the other one an isostructural Kondo insulator AB 6 , where A is a rare-earth element, e.g., Eu, Yb, or Ce. We find that if the latter orders ferromagnetically, the heterostructure generically becomes a magnetic Weyl Kondo semimetal, while antiferromagnetic order can yield a magnetic Dirac Kondo semimetal. We detail both scenarios with general symmetry considerations as well as concrete tight-binding calcu-lations and show that type-I as well as type-II magnetic Weyl/Dirac Kondo semimetal phases are possible in these heterostructures. Our results demonstrate that Kondo insulator heterostructures are a versatile platform for design of strongly correlated topological semimetals.
  • We develop a method to characterize topological phase transitions for strongly correlated Hamiltonians defined on two-dimensional lattices based on the many-body Berry curvature. Our goal is to identify a class of quantum critical points between topologically nontrivial phases with fractionally quantized Hall (FQH) conductivity and topologically trivial gapped phases through the discontinuities of the many-body Berry curvature in the so-called flux Brillouin zone (fBZ), the latter being defined by imposing all possible twisted boundary conditions. For this purpose, we study the finite-size signatures of several quantum phase transitions between fractional Chern insulators and charge-ordered phases for two-dimensional lattices by evaluating the many-body Berry curvature numerically using exact diagonalization. We observe degeneracy points (nodes) of many-body energy levels at high-symmetry points in the fBZ, accompanied by diverging Berry curvature. We find a correspondence between the number and order of these nodal points, and the change of the topological invariants of the many-body ground states across the transition, in close analogy with Weyl nodes in non-interacting band structures. This motivates us to apply a scaling procedure, originally developed for non-interacting systems, for the Berry curvature at the nodal points. This procedure offers a useful tool for the classification of topological phase transitions in interacting systems harboring FQH-like topological order.
  • Quantized electric quadrupole insulators have recently been proposed as novel quantum states of matter in two spatial dimensions. Gapped otherwise, they can feature zero-dimensional topological corner mid-gap states protected by the bulk spectral gap, reflection symmetries and a spectral symmetry. Here we introduce a topolectrical circuit design for realizing such corner modes experimentally and report measurements in which the modes appear as topological boundary resonances in the corner impedance profile of the circuit. Whereas the quantized bulk quadrupole moment of an electronic crystal does not have a direct analogue in the classical topolectrical-circuit framework, the corner modes inherit the identical form from the quantum case. Due to the flexibility and tunability of electrical circuits, they are an ideal platform for studying the reflection symmetry-protected character of corner modes in detail. Our work therefore establishes an instance where topolectrical circuitry is employed to bridge the gap between quantum theoretical modelling and the experimental realization of topological band structures.
  • We show that a simple artificial neural network trained on entanglement spectra of individual states of a many-body quantum system can be used to determine the transition between a many-body localized and a thermalizing regime. Specifically, we study the Heisenberg spin-1/2 chain in a random external field. We employ a multilayer perceptron with a single hidden layer, which is trained on labeled entanglement spectra pertaining to the fully localized and fully thermal regimes. We then apply this network to classify spectra belonging to states in the transition region. For training, we use a cost function that contains, in addition to the usual error and regularization parts, a term that favors a confident classification of the transition region states. The resulting phase diagram is in good agreement with the one obtained by more conventional methods and can be computed for small systems. In particular, the neural network outperforms conventional methods in classifying individual eigenstates pertaining to a single disorder realization. It allows us to map out the structure of these eigenstates across the transition with spatial resolution. Furthermore, we analyze the network operation using the dreaming technique to show that the neural network correctly learns by itself the power-law structure of the entanglement spectra in the many-body localized regime.
  • Weyl nodes are topological objects in three-dimensional metals. Their topological property can be revealed by studying the high-field transport properties of a Weyl semimetal. While the energy of the lowest Landau band (LLB) of a conventional Fermi pocket always increases with magnetic field due to the zero point energy, the LLB of Weyl cones remains at zero energy unless a strong magnetic field couples the Weyl fermions of opposite chirality. In the Weyl semimetal TaP, we achieve such a magnetic coupling between the electron-like Fermi pockets arising from the W1 Weyl fermions. As a result, their LLBs move above chemical potential, leading to a sharp sign reversal in the Hall resistivity at a specific magnetic field corresponding to the W1 Weyl node separation. By contrast, despite having almost identical carrier density, the annihilation is unobserved for the hole-like pockets because the W2 Weyl nodes are much further separated. These key findings, corroborated by other systematic analyses, reveal the nontrivial topology of Weyl fermions in high-field measurements.
  • We construct a family of two-dimensional non-Abelian topological phases from coupled wires using a non-Abelian bosonization approach. We then demonstrate how to determine the nature of the non-Abelian topological order (in particular, the anyonic excitations and the topological degeneracy on the torus) realized in the resulting gapped phases of matter. This paper focuses on the detailed case study of a coupled-wire realization of the bosonic $su(2)^{\,}_{2}$ Moore-Read state, but the approach we outline here can be extended to general bosonic $su(2)^{\,}_{k}$ topological phases described by non-Abelian Chern-Simons theories. We also discuss possible generalizations of this approach to the construction of three-dimensional non-Abelian topological phases.
  • Topological crystalline insulators are materials in which the crystalline symmetry leads to topologically protected surface states with a chiral spin texture, rendering them potential candidates for spintronics applications. Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we uncover the existence of one-dimensional (1D) midgap states at odd-atomic surface step edges of the three- dimensional topological crystalline insulator (Pb,Sn)Se. A minimal toy model and realistic tight- binding calculations identify them as spin-polarized flat bands connecting two Dirac points. This non-trivial origin provides the 1D midgap states with inherent stability and protects them from backscattering. We experimentally show that this stability results in a striking robustness to defects, strong magnetic fields, and elevated temperature.
  • We investigate the interplay of many-body and band structure effects of interacting Weyl semimetals (WSM). Attractive and repulsive Hubbard interactions are studied within a model for a time-reversal-breaking WSM with tetragonal symmetry, where we can approach the limit of weakly coupled planes and coupled chains by varying the hopping amplitudes. Using a slab geometry, we employ the variational cluster approach to describe the evolution of WSM Fermi arc surface states as a function of interaction strength. We find spin and charge density wave instabilities which can gap out Weyl nodes. We identify scenarios where the bulk Weyl nodes are gapped while the Fermi arcs still persist, hence realizing a quantum anomalous Hall state.
  • Very few topological systems with long-range couplings have been considered so far due to our lack of analytic approaches. Here we extend the Kitaev chain, a 1D quantum liquid, to infinite-range couplings and study its topological properties. We demonstrate that, even though topological phases are intimately linked to the notion of locality, the infinite-range couplings give rise to topological zero and non-zero energy Majorana end modes depending on the boundary conditions of the system. We show that the analytically derived properties are to a large degree stable against modifications to decaying long-range couplings. Our work opens new frontiers for topological states of matter that are relevant to current experiments where suitable interactions can be designed.
  • We study the two-dimensional (2D) Hubbard model using exact diagonalization for spin-1/2 fermions on the triangular and honeycomb lattices decorated with a single hexagon per site. In certain parameter ranges, the Hubbard model maps to a quantum compass model on those lattices. On the triangular lattice, the compass model exhibits collinear stripe antiferromagnetism, implying $d$-density wave charge order in the original Hubbard model. On the honeycomb lattice, the compass model has a unique, quantum disordered ground state that transforms nontrivially under lattice reflection. The ground state of the Hubbard model on the decorated honeycomb lattice is thus a 2D fermionic symmetry-protected topological phase. This state -- protected by time-reversal and reflection symmetries -- cannot be connected adiabatically to a free-fermion topological phase.
  • Certain phase transitions between topological quantum field theories (TQFT) are driven by the condensation of bosonic anyons. However, as bosons in a TQFT are themselves nontrivial collective excitations, there can be topological obstructions that prevent them from condensing. Here we formulate such an obstruction in the form of a no-go theorem. We use it to show that no condensation is possible in SO(3)$_k$ TQFTs with odd $k$. We further show that a layered theory obtained by tensoring SO(3)$_k$ TQFT with itself any integer number of times does not admit condensation transitions either. This includes (as the case $k=3$) the noncondensability of any number of layers of the Fibonacci TQFT.
  • The discoveries of Dirac and Weyl semimetal states in spin-orbit compounds led to the realizations of elementary particle analogs in table-top experiments. In this paper, we propose the concept of a three-dimensional type-II Dirac fermion and identify a new topological semimetal state in the large family of transition-metal icosagenides, MA3 (M=V, Nb, Ta; A=Al, Ga, In). We show that the VAl3 family features a pair of strongly Lorentz-violating type-II Dirac nodes and that each Dirac node consists of four type-II Weyl nodes with chiral charge +/-1 via symmetry breaking. Furthermore, we predict the Landau level spectrum arising from the type-II Dirac fermions in VAl3 that is distinct from that of known Dirac semimetals. We also show a topological phase transition from a type-II Dirac semimetal to a quadratic Weyl semimetal or a topological crystalline insulator via crystalline distortions. The new type-II Dirac fermions, their novel magneto-transport response, the topological tunability and the large number of compounds make VAl3 an exciting platform to explore the wide-ranging topological phenomena associated with Lorentz-violating Dirac fermions in electrical and optical transport, spectroscopic and device-based experiments.
  • Topological metals and semimetals (TMs) have recently drawn significant interest. These materials give rise to condensed matter realizations of many important concepts in high-energy physics, leading to wide-ranging protected properties in transport and spectroscopic experiments. The most studied TMs, i.e., Weyl and Dirac semimetals, feature quasiparticles that are direct analogues of the textbook elementary particles. Moreover, the TMs known so far can be characterized based on the dimensionality of the band crossing. While Weyl and Dirac semimetals feature zero-dimensional points, the band crossing of nodal-line semimetals forms a one-dimensional closed loop. In this paper, we identify a TM which breaks the above paradigms. Firstly, the TM features triply-degenerate band crossing in a symmorphic lattice, hence realizing emergent fermionic quasiparticles not present in quantum field theory. Secondly, the band crossing is neither 0D nor 1D. Instead, it consists of two isolated triply-degenerate nodes interconnected by multi-segments of lines with two-fold degeneracy. We present materials candidates. We further show that triplydegenerate band crossings in symmorphic crystals give rise to a Landau level spectrum distinct from the known TMs, suggesting novel magneto-transport responses. Our results open the door for realizing new topological phenomena and fermions including transport anomalies and spectroscopic responses in metallic crystals with nontrivial topology beyond the Weyl/Dirac paradigm.
  • We introduce the notion of a band-inverted, topological semimetal in two-dimensional nonsymmorphic crystals. This notion is materialized in the monolayers of MTe$_2$ (M $=$ W, Mo) if spin-orbit coupling is neglected. We characterize the Dirac band touching topologically by the Wilson loop of the non-Abelian Berry gauge field. An additional feature of the Dirac cone in monolayer MTe$_2$ is that it tilts over in a Lifshitz transition to produce electron and hole pockets, a type-II Dirac cone. These pockets, together with the pseudospin structure of the Dirac electrons, suggest a unified, topological explanation for the recently-reported, non-saturating magnetoresistance in WTe$_2$, as well as its circular dichroism in photoemission. We complement our analysis and first-principle bandstructure calculations with an $\textit{ab-initio}$-derived-derived tight-binding model for the WTe$_2$ monolayer.
  • Coupled-wire constructions have proven to be useful tools to characterize Abelian and non-Abelian topological states of matter in two spatial dimensions. In many cases, their success has been complemented by the vast arsenal of other theoretical tools available to study such systems. In three dimensions, however, much less is known about topological phases. Since the theoretical arsenal in this case is smaller, it stands to reason that wire constructions, which are based on one-dimensional physics, could play a useful role in developing a greater microscopic understanding of three-dimensional topological phases. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive strategy, based on the geometric arrangement of commuting projectors in the toric code, to generate and characterize coupled-wire realizations of strongly-interacting three-dimensional topological phases. We show how this method can be used to construct pointlike and linelike excitations, and to determine the topological degeneracy. We also point out how, with minor modifications, the machinery already developed in two dimensions can be naturally applied to study the surface states of these systems, a fact that has implications for the study of surface topological order. Finally, we show that the strategy developed for the construction of three-dimensional topological phases generalizes readily to arbitrary dimensions, vastly expanding the existing landscape of coupled-wire theories. Throughout the paper, we discuss $\mathbb{Z}^{\,}_m$ topological order in three and four dimensions as a concrete example of this approach, but the approach itself is not limited to this type of topological order.
  • We study photonic signatures of symmetry broken and topological phases in a driven, dissipative circuit QED realization of spin-1/2 chains. Specifically, we consider the transverse-field XY model and a dual model with 3-spin interactions. The former has a ferromagnetic and a paramagnetic phase, while the latter features, in addition, a symmetry protected topological phase. Using the method of third quantization, we calculate the non-equilibrium steady-state of the open spin chains for arbitrary system sizes and temperatures. We find that the bi-local correlation function of the spins at both ends of the chain provides a sensitive measure for both symmetry-breaking and topological phase transitions of the systems, but no universal means to distinguish between the two types of transitions. Both models have equivalent representations in terms of free Majorana fermions, which host zero, one and two topological Majorana end modes in the paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, and symmetry protected topological phases, respectively. The correlation function we study retains its bi-local character in the fermionic representation, so that our results are equally applicable to the fermionic models in their own right. We propose a photonic realization of the dissipative transverse-field XY model in a tunable setup, where an array of superconducting transmon qubits is coupled at both ends to a photonic microwave circuit.
  • Superconductivity in topological band structures is a platform for many novel exotic quantum phenomena such as emergent supersymmetry. This potential nourishes the search for topological materials with intrinsic superconducting instabilities, in which Cooper pairing is introduced to electrons with helical spin texture such as the Dirac states of topological insulators and Dirac Semimetals, forming a natural topological superconductor of helical kind. We employ first-principles calculations, ARPES experiments and new theoretical analysis to reveal that PbTaSe2, a non-centrosymmetric superconductor, possesses a nonzero Z2 topological invariant and fully spin-polarized Dirac states. Moreover, we analyze the phonon spectrum of PbTaSe2 to show how superconductivity can emerge due to a stiffening of phonons by the Pb intercalation, which diminishes a competing charge-density-wave instability. Our work establishes PbTaSe2 as a stoichiometric superconductor with nontrivial Z2 topological band structure, and shows that it holds great promise for studying novel forms of topological superconductivity not realized previously.
  • Weyl semimetals provide the realization of Weyl fermions in solid-state physics. Among all the physical phenomena that are enabled by Weyl semimetals, the chiral anomaly is the most unusual one. Here, we report signatures of the chiral anomaly in the magneto-transport measurements on the first Weyl semimetal TaAs. We show negative magnetoresistance under parallel electric and magnetic fields, that is, unlike most metals whose resistivity increases under an external magnetic field, we observe that our high mobility TaAs samples become more conductive as a magnetic field is applied along the direction of the current for certain ranges of the field strength. We present systematically detailed data and careful analyses, which allow us to exclude other possible origins of the observed negative magnetoresistance. Our transport data, corroborated by photoemission measurements, first-principles calculations and theoretical analyses, collectively demonstrate signatures of the Weyl fermion chiral anomaly in the magneto-transport of TaAs.