• We have conducted a novel search of most of the southern sky for nearby red dwarfs having low proper motions, with specific emphasis on those with proper motion < 0.18 arcsec yr-1, the lower cutoff of Luyten's classic proper motion catalog. We used a tightly constrained search of the SuperCOSMOS database and a suite of photometric distance relations for photographic BRI and 2MASS JHKs magnitudes to estimate distances to more than fourteen million red dwarf candidates. Here we discuss 29 stars in 26 systems estimated to be within 25 parsecs, all of which have pm < 0.18 arcsec yr-1, which we have investigated using milliarcsecond astrometry, VRI photometry, and low-resolution spectroscopy. In total, we present the first parallaxes of 20 star systems, nine of which are within 25 parsecs. We have additionally identified eight young M dwarfs, of which two are new members of the nearby young moving groups, and 72 new giants, including two new carbon stars. We also present the entire catalog of 1215 sources we have identified by this means.
  • We report high resolution optical speckle observations of 336 M dwarfs which result in 113 measurements of relative position of 80 systems and 256 other stars with no indications of duplicity. These are the first measurements for two of the systems. We also present the earliest measures of relative position for 17 others. We include orbits for six of the systems, two revised and four reported for the first time. For one of the systems with a new orbit, G 161-7, we determine masses of 0.156 +/- 0.011 and 0.1175 +/-0.0079 \msun for the A and B components, respectively. All six of these new calculated orbits have short periods between five and thirty-eight years and hold the promise of deriving accurate masses in the near future. For many other pairs we can establish their nature as physical or chance alignment depending on their relative motion. Of the 80 systems, 32 have calculated orbits, 25 others are physical pairs, 4 are optical pairs and 19 are currently unknown.
  • We describe the 44 systems discovered to be within 10 parsecs of the Sun by the RECONS team, primarily via the long-term astrometry program at CTIO that began in 1999. The systems --- including 41 with red dwarf primaries, 2 white dwarfs, and 1 brown dwarf --- have been found to have trigonometric parallaxes greater than 100 milliarcseconds (mas), with errors of 0.4--2.4 mas in all but one case. We provide updated astrometric, photometric (VRIJHK magnitudes), spectral type, and multiplicity information here. Among these are 14 systems that are new entries to the 10 parsec sample based on parallaxes measured at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m telescope. These are the first parallaxes for nine systems, while the remaining five systems had previously measured parallaxes with errors greater than 10 mas or values placing them beyond 10 parsecs. We also present parallaxes from URAT for seven of these systems, providing additional evidence that they are closer than 10 parsecs. In addition, we provide new data for 22 systems that were previously known to lie within 10 parsecs and 9 systems reported to be closer than that horizon but for which new parallaxes place them further away. In total, we provide data for 75 systems, for which 71 have new or updated parallaxes here. The 44 systems added by RECONS comprise one of every seven systems known within 10 parsecs. We illustrate the evolution of the 10 parsec sample from the 191 systems known when the final Yale Parallax Catalog (YPC) was published in 1995 to the 316 systems known today. Even so close to the Sun, additional discoveries of red and brown dwarfs (and perhaps even white dwarfs) are likely, both as primaries and secondaries, although we estimate that at least 90% of the stellar systems closer than 10 parsecs have now been identified.
  • We present 160 new trigonometric parallaxes for 151 M dwarf systems from the REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars (RECONS) group's long-term astrometry/photometry program at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m telescope. Most systems (124 or 82%) are found to lie within 25 pc. The stars have 119 mas/yr < mu < 828 mas/yr and 3.85 < (V-K) < 8.47. Among these are 58 systems from the SuperCOSMOS-RECONS (SCR) search, discovered via our proper motion trawls of the SuperCOSMOS digitized archival photographic plates, while the remaining stars were suspected via photometric distance estimates to lie nearby. Sixteen are systems that are newly discovered via astrometric perturbations to be binaries, many of which are ideal for accurate mass determinations due to their proximity and orbital periods on the order of a decade. A variability analysis of the stars presented, two-thirds of which are new results, shows six of the stars to vary by more than 20 mmag. This effort brings the total number of parallaxes for M dwarf systems measured by RECONS to nearly 500 and increases by 26% the number of southern M dwarf systems with accurate trigonometric parallaxes placing them within 25 pc.
  • We present 114 trigonometric parallaxes for 107 nearby white dwarf (WD) systems from both the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Parallax Investigation (CTIOPI) and the U. S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station (NOFS) parallax programs. Of these, 76 parallaxes for 69 systems were measured by the CTIOPI program and 38 parallaxes for as many systems were measured by the NOFS program. A total of 50 systems are confirmed to be within the 25 pc horizon of interest. Coupled with a spectroscopic confirmation of a common proper motion companion to a Hipparcos star within 25 pc as well as confirmation parallax determinations for two WD systems included in the recently released Tycho Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) catalog, we add 53 new systems to the 25 pc WD sample $-$ a 42% increase. Our sample presented here includes four strong candidate halo systems, a new metal-rich DAZ WD, a confirmation of a recently discovered nearby short-period (P = 2.85 hr) double degenerate, a WD with a new astrometric pertubation (long period, unconstrained with our data), and a new triple system where the WD companion main-sequence star has an astrometric perturbation (P $\sim$ 1.6 yr).
  • We report on speckle observations of binary stars carried out at the WIYN Telescope over the period from September 2010 through February 2012, providing relative astrometry for 2521 observations of 883 objects, 856 of which are double stars and 27 of which are triples. The separations measured span a range of 0.01 to 1.75 arc seconds. Wavelengths of 562 nm, 692 nm, and 880 nm were used, and differential photometry at one or more of these wavelengths is presented in most cases. Sixty-six components were resolved for the first time. We also estimate detection limits at 0.2 and 1.0 arc seconds for high-quality observations in cases where no companion was seen, a total of 176 additional objects. Detection limits vary based on observing conditions and signal-to-noise ratio, but are approximately 4 magnitudes at 0.2 arc seconds and 6 magnitudes at 1.0 arc seconds on average. Analyzing the measurement precision of the data set, we find that the individual separations obtained have linear measurement uncertainties of approximately 2 mas, and photometry is uncertain to approximately 0.1 magnitudes in general. This work provides fundamental, well-calibrated data for future orbit and mass determinations, and we present three first orbits and total mass estimates of nearby K-dwarf systems as examples of this potential.
  • We use 612 single stars with previously published trigonometric parallaxes placing them within 25 pc to evaluate parallaxes released in Gaia's first data release (DR1). We find that the Gaia parallaxes are, on average, $0.24 \pm 0.02$ mas smaller than the weighted mean trigonometric parallax values for these stars in the solar neighborhood. We also find that the offset changes with distance out to 100 pc, in the sense that the closer the star, the larger the offset. We find no systematic trends in the parallax offsets with stellar $V$ magnitude, $V-K$ color, or proper motion. We do find that the offset is roughly twice as large for stars south of the ecliptic compared to those that are north.
  • We present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of 79 nearby M dwarfs in 77 systems. All are low-proper-motion southern hemisphere objects and were identified in a nearby star survey with a demonstrated sensitivity to young stars. Using low-resolution optical spectroscopy from the Red Side Spectrograph (RSS) on the South African Large Telescope (SALT), we have determined radial velocities, H-alpha, Lithium 6708\AA, and Potassium 7699\AA~equivalent widths linked to age and activity, and spectral types for all our targets. Combined with astrometric information from literature sources, we identify 44 young stars. Eighteen are previously known members of moving groups within 100 parsecs of the Sun. Twelve are new members, including one member of the TW Hydra moving group, one member of the 32 Orionis moving group, nine members of Tucana-Horologium, one member of Argus, and two new members of AB Doradus. We also find fourteen young star systems that are not members of any known groups. The remaining 33 star systems do not appear to be young. This appears to be evidence of a new population of nearby young stars not related to the known nearby young moving groups.
  • We present the results of a precise near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) survey of 32 low-mass stars with spectral types K2-M4 using CSHELL at the NASA IRTF in the $K$-band with an isotopologue methane gas cell to achieve wavelength calibration and a novel iterative RV extraction method. We surveyed 14 members of young ($\approx$ 25-150 Myr) moving groups, the young field star $\varepsilon$ Eridani as well as 18 nearby ($<$ 25 pc) low-mass stars and achieved typical single-measurement precisions of 8-15 m s$^{-1}$ with a long-term stability of 15-50 m s$^{-1}$. We obtain the best NIR RV constraints to date on 27 targets in our sample, 19 of which were never followed by high-precision RV surveys. Our results indicate that very active stars can display long-term RV variations as low as $\sim$ 25-50 m s$^{-1}$ at $\approx$ 2.3125 $\mu$m, thus constraining the effect of jitter at these wavelengths. We provide the first multi-wavelength confirmation of GJ 876 bc and independently retrieve orbital parameters consistent with previous studies. We recovered RV variability for HD 160934 AB and GJ 725 AB that are consistent with their known binary orbits, and nine other targets are candidate RV variables with a statistical significance of 3-5$\sigma$. Our method combined with the new iSHELL spectrograph will yield long-term RV precisions of $\lesssim$ 5 m s$^{-1}$ in the NIR, which will allow the detection of Super-Earths near the habitable zone of mid-M dwarfs.
  • We present an analysis of long-term photometric variability for nearby red dwarfs at optical wavelengths. The sample consists of 264 M dwarfs south of DEC = +30 with V-K = 3.96-9.16 and Mv~10-20 (spectral types M2V-M8V), most of which are within 25 pc. The stars have been observed in the VRI filters for ~4-14 years at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m telescope. Of the 238 red dwarfs within 25 pc, we find that only ~8% are photometrically variable by at least 20 mmag (~2%) in the VRI bands. We find that high variability at optical wavelengths over the long-term can be used to identify young stars. Overall, however, the fluxes of most red dwarfs at optical wavelengths are steady to a few percent over the long term. The low overall rate of photometric variability for red dwarfs is consistent with results found in previous work on similar stars on shorter timescales, with the body of work indicating that most red dwarfs are only mildly variable. We highlight 17 stars that show long-term changes in brightness, sometimes because of flaring activity or spots, and sometimes because of stellar cycles similar to our Sun's solar cycle. Remarkably, two targets show brightnesses that monotonically increase (G 169-029) or decrease (WT 460AB) by several percent over a decade. We also provide long-term variability measurements for seven M dwarfs within 25 pc that host exoplanets, none of which vary by more than 20 mmag. Both as a population, and for the specific red dwarfs with exoplanets observed here, photometric variability is therefore often not a concern for planetary environments, at least at the optical wavelengths where they emit much of their light.
  • In an effort to better understand the details of the stellar structure and evolution of metal poor stars, the Gemini North telescope was used on two occasions to take speckle imaging data of a sample of known spectroscopic binary stars and other nearby stars in order to search for and resolve close companions. The observations were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which takes data in two filters simultaneously. The results presented here are of 90 observations of 23 systems in which one or more companions was detected, and 6 stars where no companion was detected to the limit of the camera capabilities at Gemini. In the case of the binary and multiple stars, these results are then further analyzed to make first orbit determinations in five cases, and orbit refinements in four other cases. Mass information is derived, and since the systems span a range in metallicity, a study is presented that compares our results with the expected trend in total mass as derived from the most recent Yale isochrones as a function of metal abundance. These data suggest that metal-poor main-sequence stars are less massive at a given color than their solar-metallicity analogues in a manner consistent with that predicted from the theory.
  • We present a carefully vetted equatorial ($\pm$ 30$^\circ$ Decl.) sample of all known single (within 4'') mid M-dwarfs (M2.5V-M8.0V) extending out to 10 pc; their proximity and low masses make them ideal targets for planet searches. For this sample of 58 stars, we provide V$_J$, R$_{KC}$, I$_{KC}$ photometry, new low dispersion optical ($6000 - 9000$\AA) spectra from which uniform spectral types are determined, multi-epoch H$\alpha$ equivalent widths, and gravity sensitive $Na\,I$ indices. For 12 of these 58 stars, strict limits are placed on the presence of stellar and sub-stellar companions, based on a pioneering program described here that utilizes precise infrared radial velocities and optical astrometric measurements in an effort to search for Jupiter-mass, brown dwarf and stellar-mass companions. Our infrared radial velocity precision using CSHELL at NASA's IRTF is $\sim$90 m s$^{-1}$ over timescales from 13 days to 5 years. With our spectroscopic results the mean companion masses that we rule out of existence are 1.5 M$_{JUP}$ or greater in 10 day orbital periods and 7 M$_{JUP}$ or greater in 100 day orbital periods. We use these spectra to determine rotational velocities and absolute radial velocities of these twelve stars. Our mean astrometric precision using RECONS data from 0.9-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory is $\sim$3 milli-arcseconds over baselines ranging from 9 to 13 years. With our astrometric results the mean companion masses that we rule out of existence are greater than 11.5 M$_{JUP}$ with an orbital period of 4 years and greater than 7.5 M$_{JUP}$ with an orbital period of 8 years. Although we do not detect companions around our sub-sample of 12 stars, we demonstrate that our two techniques probe a regime that is commonly missed in other companion searches of late type stars.
  • We present trigonometric, photometric, and photographic distances to 1748 southern ($\delta \leq$0$^\circ$) M dwarf systems with $\mu \ge$ 0\farcs18 yr$^{-1}$, of which 1404 are believed to lie within 25 parsecs of the Sun. The stars have 6.67 $\leq$ $V_J$ $\leq$ 21.38 and 3.50 $\leq$ ($V_J-K_s$) $\leq$ 9.27, covering the entire M dwarf spectral sequence from M0.0V through M9.5V. This sample therefore provides a comprehensive snapshot of our current knowledge of the southern sky for the nearest M dwarfs that dominate the stellar population of the Galaxy. Roughly one-third of the 1748 systems, each of which has an M dwarf primary, have published high quality parallaxes, including 179 from the RECONS astrometry program. For the remaining systems, we offer photometric distance estimates that have well-calibrated errors. The bulk of these ($\sim$700) are based on new $V_JR_{KC}I_{KC}$ photometry acquired at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m telescope, while the remaining 500 primaries have photographic plate distance estimates calculated using SuperCOSMOS $B_JR_{59F}I_{IVN}$ photometry. Confirmed and candidate subdwarfs in the sample have been identified, and a census of companions is included.
  • Astrometric measurements are presented for seven nearby stars with previously detected planets: six M dwarfs (GJ 317, GJ 667C, GJ 581, GJ 849, GJ 876, and GJ 1214) and one K dwarf (BD $-$10 3166). Measurements are also presented for six additional nearby M dwarfs without known planets, but which are more favorable to astrometric detections of low mass companions, as well as three binary systems for which we provide astrometric orbit solutions. Observations have baselines of three to thirteen years, and were made as part of the RECONS long-term astrometry and photometry program at the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9m telescope. We provide trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions for all 16 systems, and perform an extensive analysis of the astrometric residuals to determine the minimum detectable companion mass for the 12 M dwarfs not having close stellar secondaries. For the six M dwarfs with known planets, we are not sensitive to planets, but can rule out the presence of all but the least massive brown dwarfs at periods of 2 - 12 years. For the six more astrometrically favorable M dwarfs, we conclude that none have brown dwarf companions, and are sensitive to companions with masses as low as 1 $M_{Jup}$ for periods longer than two years. In particular, we conclude that Proxima Centauri has no Jovian companions at orbital periods of 2 - 12 years. These results complement previously published M dwarf planet occurrence rates by providing astrometrically determined upper mass limits on potential super-Jupiter companions at orbits of two years and longer. As part of a continuing survey, these results are consistent with the paucity of super-Jupiter and brown dwarf companions we find among the over 250 red dwarfs within 25 pc observed longer than five years in our astrometric program.
  • We present basic observational data and association membership analysis for 45 young and active low-mass stellar systems from the ongoing RECONS photometry and astrometry program at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Most of these systems have saturated X-ray emission (log(Lx/Lbol) > -3.5) based on X-ray fluxes from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, and many are significantly more luminous than main-sequence stars of comparable color. We present parallaxes and proper motions, Johnson-Kron-Cousins VRI photometry, and multiplicity observations from the CTIOPI program on the CTIO 0.9m telescope. To this we add low-resolution optical spectroscopy and line measurements from the CTIO 1.5m telescope, and interferometric binary measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensors. We also incorporate data from published sources: JHKs photometry from the 2MASS point source catalog; X-ray data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey; and radial velocities from literature sources. Within the sample of 45 systems, we identify 21 candidate low-mass pre-main-sequence members of nearby associations, including members of beta Pictoris, TW Hydrae, Argus, AB Doradus, two ambiguous 30 Myr old systems, and one object that may be a member of the Ursa Major moving group. Of the 21 candidate young systems, 14 are newly identified as a result of this work, and six of those are within 25 parsecs of the Sun.
  • We construct a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for the stellar/substellar boundary based on a sample of 63 objects ranging in spectral type from M6V to L4. We report newly observed VRI photometry for all 63 objects and new trigonometric parallaxes for 37 objects. The remaining 26 objects have trigonometric parallaxes from the literature. We combine our optical photometry and trigonometric parallaxes with 2MASS and WISE photometry and employ a novel SED fitting algorithm to determine effective temperatures, bolometric luminosities, and radii. Our uncertainties range from ~20K to ~150K in temperature, ~0.01 to ~0.06 in log(L/Ls}) and 3% to 10% in radius. We check our methodology by comparing our calculated radii to radii directly measured via long baseline optical interferometry. We find evidence for the local minimum in the radius-temperature and radius-luminosity trends that signals the end of the stellar main sequence and the start of the brown dwarf sequence at T ~ 2075K, log(L/Ls)~ -3.9, and (R/Rs) ~ 0.086. The existence of this local minimum is predicted by evolutionary models, but at temperatures ~400K cooler. The minimum radius happens near the locus of 2MASS J0523-1403, an L2.5 dwarf with V-K=9.42. We make qualitative arguments as to why the effects of the recent revision in solar abundances accounts for the discrepancy between our findings and the evolutionary models. We also report new color-absolute magnitude relations for optical and infrared colors useful for estimating photometric distances. We study the optical variability of all 63 targets and find an overall variability fraction of 36^{+9}_{-7}% at a threshold of 15 milli-magnitudes in the I band, in agreement with previous studies.
  • We report new infrared radial velocity measurements obtained with CSHELL at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility that reveal the M3.5 dwarf GJ 867B to be a single-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 1.795 $\pm$ 0.017 days. Its velocity semi-amplitude of 21.4 $\pm$ 0.5 km s$^{-1}$ corresponds to a minimum mass of 61 $\pm$ 7 M$_{JUP}$; the new companion, which we call GJ 867D, could be a brown dwarf. Stable astrometric measurements of GJ 867BD obtained with CTIO's 0.9-m telescope over the last decade exclude the presence of any massive planetary companions (7-18 M$_{JUP}$) with longer orbital periods (2-10 years) for the majority of orientations. These complementary observations are also used to determine the trigonometric distance and proper motion of GJ 867BD; the measurements are consistent with the HIPPARCOS measured values of the M2 dwarf GJ 867AC, which is itself a 4.1 day double-lined spectroscopic binary at a projected separation of 24.5" (216 AU) from GJ 867BD. These new measurements strengthen the case that GJ 867AC and GJ 867BD are physically associated, making the GJ 867 system one of only four quadruple systems within 10 pc of the Sun (d$=$ 8.82 $\pm$0.08 pc) and the only among these with all M-dwarf (or cooler) components.
  • We report the discovery of a nearby M5.0V dwarf at 24.6 pc, SCR 1848-6855, that is orbited by an unusual companion causing an astrometric perturbation of more than 200 milli-arcseconds. This is by far the largest perturbation found to date among more than 700 targets observed during our long-term astrometry/photometry program at the CTIO 0.9-m telescope. We present here a suite of astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic observations of this high proper motion (~1.3"/yr) system in an effort to reveal the nature of this unusual binary. The measured near-UV and optical U band fluxes exceed those expected for comparable M5.0V stars, and excess flux is also detected in the spectral range 4000A--7000A. The elusive companion has been detected in HST-STIS+MAMA images at 1820A and 2700A, and our analysis shows that it is probably a rare, cool, white dwarf with T = 4600-5500K. Given the long-term astrometric coverage, the prospects for an accurate mass determination are excellent, although as yet we can only provide limits on the unusual companion's mass.
  • LP 876-10 is a nearby active M4 dwarf in Aquarius at a distance of 7.6 pc. The star is a new addition to the 10-pc census, with a parallax measured via the Research Consortium on Nearby Stars (RECONS) astrometric survey on the Small & Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System's (SMARTS) 0.9-m telescope. We demonstrate that the astrometry, radial velocity, and photometric data for LP 876-10 are consistent with the star being a third, bound, stellar component to the Fomalhaut multiple system, despite the star lying nearly 6 degrees away from Fomalhaut A in the sky. The 3D separation of LP 876-10 from Fomalhaut is only 0.77+-0.01 pc, and 0.987+-0.006 pc from TW PsA (Fomalhaut B), well within the estimated tidal radius of the Fomalhaut system (1.9 pc). LP 876-10 shares the motion of Fomalhaut within ~1 km/s, and we estimate an interloper probability of ~10^{-5}. Neither our echelle spectroscopy nor astrometry are able to confirm the close companion to LP 876-10 reported in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WSI 138). We argue that the Castor Moving Group to which the Fomalhaut system purportedly belongs, is likely to be a dynamical stream, and hence membership to the group does not provide useful age constraints for group members. LP 876-10 (Fomalhaut C) has now risen from obscurity to become a rare example of a field M dwarf with well-constrained age (440+-40 Myr) and metallicity. Besides harboring a debris disk system and candidate planet, Fomalhaut now has two of the widest known stellar companions.
  • We use the sample of known stars and brown dwarfs within 5 pc of the Sun, supplemented with AFGK stars within 10 pc, to determine which stellar spectral types provide the most habitable real estate --- defined to be locations where liquid water could be present on Earth-like planets. Stellar temperatures and radii are determined by fitting model spectra to spatially resolved broad-band photometric energy distributions for stars in the sample. The locations of the HZ's are calculated using an empirical formula for planetary surface temperature and assuming the condition of liquid water, called here the empirical habitable zone, or EHZ. Systems that have dynamically disruptive companions, assuming a 5:1 separation ratios for primary/secondary pairs and either object and a planet, are considered not habitable. We then derive a simple formula to predict the location of the EHZ for main sequence stars based on V-K color. We consider EHZ widths as more useful measures of the habitable real estate around stars than areas because multiple planets are not expected to orbit stars at identical stellar distances. This EHZ provides a qualitative guide on where to expect the largest population of planets in the HZ of main sequence stars. M stars provide more EHZ real estate than other spectral types, possessing 36.5% of the habitable real estate en masse. K stars are second with 21.5%, while A, F, and G stars offer 18.5%, 6.9% and 16.6%, respectively. Our calculations show that three M dwarfs within 10 pc harbor planets in their EHZs. GJ 581 may have two planets (d with msini = 6.1 M_E; g with msini = 3.1 M_E), GJ 667 C has one (c with msini = 4.5 M_E), and GJ 876 has two (b with msini = 1.89 M_J and c with msini = 0.56 M_J). If Earth-like planets are as common around low mass stars as recent Kepler results suggest, M stars are the most likely place to find Earth-like planets in HZ's.
  • We report on our analysis of HST/NICMOS snapshot high resolution images of 255 stars in 201 systems within ~10 parsecs of the Sun. Photometry was obtained through filters F110W, F180M, F207M, and F222M using NICMOS Camera 2. These filters were selected to permit clear identification of cool brown dwarfs through methane contrast imaging. With a plate scale of 76 mas/pixel, NICMOS can easily resolve binaries with sub-arcsecond separations in the 19".5x19".5 field of view. We previously reported five companions to nearby M and L dwarfs from this search. No new companions were discovered during the second phase of data analysis presented here, confirming that stellar/substellar binaries are rare. We establish magnitude and separation limits for which companions can be ruled out for each star in the sample, and then perform a comprehensive sensitivity and completeness analysis for the subsample of 138 M dwarfs in 126 systems. We calculate a multiplicity fraction of 0.0{-0.0}^{+3.5}% for L companions to M dwarfs in the separation range of 5 to 70 AU, and 2.3_{-0.7}^{+5.0}% for L and T companions to M dwarfs in the separation range of 10 to 70 AU. We also discuss trends in the color-magnitude diagrams using various color combinations and present astrometry for 19 multiple systems in our sample. Considering these results and results from several other studies, we argue that the so-called "brown dwarf desert" extends to binary systems with low mass primaries and is largely independent of primary mass, mass ratio, and separations. While focusing on companion properties, we discuss how the qualitative agreement between observed companion mass functions and initial mass functions suggests that the paucity of brown dwarfs in either population may be due to a common cause and not due to binary formation mechanisms.
  • We present the results of a multi-technique investigation of the M4.5Ve flare star AP Col, which we discover to be the nearest pre-main-sequence star. These include astrometric data from the CTIO 0.9m, from which we derive a proper motion of 342.0+/-0.5 mas yr^-1, a trigonometric parallax of 119.21+/-0.98 mas (8.39+/-0.07 pc), and photometry and photometric variability at optical wavelengths. We also provide spectroscopic data, including radial velocity (22.4+/-0.3 km s^-1), lithium Equivalent Width (EW) (0.28+/-0.02 A), H-alpha EW (-6.0 to -35 A), {\it vsini} (11+/-1 km s^-1), and gravity indicators from the Siding Spring 2.3-m WiFeS, Lick 3-m Hamilton echelle, and Keck-I HIRES echelle spectrographs. The combined observations demonstrate that AP Col is the closer of only two known systems within 10 pc of the Sun younger than 100 Myr. Given its space motion and apparent age of 12-50 Myr, AP Col is likely a member of the recently proposed ~40 Myr old Argus/IC 2391 association.
  • Here we present 1584 new southern proper motion systems with mu > 0.18 "/yr and 16.5 > R_59F > 18.0. This search complements the six previous SuperCOSMOS-RECONS (SCR) proper motion searches of the southern sky for stars within the same proper motion range, but with R_59F < 16.5. As in previous papers, we present distance estimates for these systems and find that three systems are estimated to be within 25 pc, including one, SCR 1546-5534, possibly within the RECONS 10 pc horizon at 6.7 pc, making it the second nearest discovery of the searches. We find 97 white dwarf candidates with distance estimates between 10 and 120 pc, as well as 557 cool subdwarf candidates. The subdwarfs found in this paper make up nearly half of the subdwarf systems reported from our SCR searches, and are significantly redder than those discovered thus far. The SCR searches have now found 155 red dwarfs estimated to be within 25 pc, including 10 within 10 pc. In addition, 143 white dwarf candidates and 1155 cool subdwarf candidates have been discovered. The 1584 systems reported here augment the sample of 4724 systems previously discovered in our SCR searches, and imply that additional systems fainter than R_59F = 18.0 are yet to be discovered.
  • We present 2817 new southern proper motion systems with 0.40 "/yr > mu > 0.18 "/yr and declination between -47 degrees and 00 degrees. This is a continuation of the SuperCOSMOS-RECONS (SCR) proper motion searches of the southern sky. We use the same photometric relations as previous searches to provide distance estimates based on the assumption that the objects are single main sequence stars. We find 79 new red dwarf systems predicted to be within 25 pc, including a few new components of previously known systems. Two systems - SCR 1731-2452 at 9.5 pc and SCR 1746-3214 at 9.9 pc - are anticipated to be within 10 pc. We also find 23 new white dwarf candidates with distance estimates of 15-66 pc, as well as 360 new red subdwarf candidates. With this search, we complete the SCR sweep of the southern sky for stars with mu > 0.18 "/yr and R_59F < 16.5, resulting in a total of 5042 objects in 4724 previously unreported proper motion systems. Here we provide selected comprehensive lists from our SCR proper motion search to date, including 152 red dwarf systems estimated to be within 25 pc (nine within 10 pc), 46 white dwarfs (ten within 25 pc), and 598 subdwarf candidates. The results of this search suggest that there are more nearby systems to be found at fainter magnitudes and lower proper motion limits than those probed so far.
  • We present 41 trigonometric parallaxes of 37 stellar systems, most of which have proper motions greater than 1\farcs0 yr$^{-1}$. These are the first trigonometric parallaxes for 24 systems. Overall, there are 15 red dwarf systems and 22 red subdwarf systems in the sample. Five of the systems are multiples with directly detected companions, and we have discovered perturbations caused by unseen companions in two additional cases, the dwarf LHS 501 and the subdwarf LHS 440. The latter system may eventually provide important dynamical mass points on the subdwarf mass-luminosity relation. Two additional stars of note are LHS 272, the third closest M-type subdwarf at a distance of only 13.6 pc, and LHS 2734AB, a high velocity subdwarf binary with $V_{tan}>$ 700 km/sec, which likely exceeds the escape velocity of the Milky Way. We also report the first long term variability study of cool subdwarfs indicating that cool subdwarfs are less photometrically variable than their main sequence counterparts.