• The Monte Carlo model Sibyll has been designed for efficient simulation of hadronic multiparticle production up to the highest energies as needed for interpreting cosmic ray measurements. For more than 15 years, version 2.1 of Sibyll has been one of the standard models for air shower simulation. Motivated by data of LHC and fixed-target experiments and a better understanding of the phenomenology of hadronic interactions, we have developed an improved version of this model, version 2.3, which has been released in 2016. In this contribution we present a revised version of this model, called Sibyll 2.3c, that is further improved by adjusting particle production spectra to match the expectation of Feynman scaling in the fragmentation region. After a brief introduction to the changes implemented in Sibyll 2.3 and 2.3c with respect to Sibyll 2.1, the current predictions of the model for the depth of shower maximum, the number of muons at ground, and the energy spectrum of muons in extensive air showers are presented.
  • We outline two concepts to explain Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs), one based on radio galaxies and their relativistic jets and terminal hot spots, and one based on relativistic Super-Novae (SNe) or Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in starburst galaxies, one matching the arrival direction data in the South (the radio galaxy Cen A) and one in the North (the starburst galaxy M82). Ubiquitous neutrino emission follows accompanied by compact TeV photon emission, detectable more easily if the direction is towards Earth. The ejection of UHECRs is last. We have observed particles up to ZeV, neutrinos up to PeV, photons up to TeV, 30 - 300 Hz GW events, and hope to detect soon of order Hz to mHz GW events. Energy turnover in single low frequency GW events may be of order 10^63 erg. How can we further test these concepts? First of all by associating individual UHECR events, or directional groups of events, with chemical composition in both the Telescope Array (TA) Coll. and the Auger Coll. data. Second by identifying more TeV to PeV neutrinos with recent SMBH mergers. Third by detecting the order < mHz GW events of SMBH binaries, and identifying the galaxies host to the stellar BH mergers and their GW events in the range up to 300 Hz. Fourth by finally detecting the formation of the first generation of SMBHs and their mergers, surely a spectacular discovery.
  • The event generator Sibyll can be used for the simulation of hadronic multiparticle production up to the highest cosmic ray energies. It is optimized for providing an economic description of those aspects of the expected hadronic final states that are needed for the calculation of air showers and atmospheric lepton fluxes. New measurements from fixed target and collider experiments, in particular those at LHC, allow us to test the predictive power of the model version 2.1, which was released more than 10 years ago, and also to identify shortcomings. Based on a detailed comparison of the model predictions with the new data we revisit model assumptions and approximations to obtain an improved version of the interaction model. In addition a phenomenological model for the production of charm particles is implemented as needed for the calculation of prompt lepton fluxes in the energy range of the astrophysical neutrinos recently discovered by IceCube. After giving an overview of the new ideas implemented in Sibyll and discussing how they lead to an improved description of accelerator data, predictions for air showers and atmospheric lepton fluxes are presented.
  • An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.
  • SIBYLL 2.1 is an event generator for hadron interactions at the highest energies. It is commonly used to analyze and interpret extensive air shower measurements. In light of the first detection of PeV neutrinos by the IceCube collaboration the inclusive fluxes of muons and neutrinos in the atmosphere have become very important. Predicting these fluxes requires understanding of the hadronic production of charmed particles since these contribute significantly to the fluxes at high energy through their prompt decay. We will present an updated version of SIBYLL that has been tuned to describe LHC data and extended to include the production of charmed hadrons.
  • The statistics of black holes and their masses strongly suggests that their mass distribution has a cutoff towards lower masses near $3 \times 10^{6}$ M$_{\odot}$. This is consistent with a classical formation mechanism from the agglomeration of the first massive stars in the universe. However, when the masses of the stars approach $10^{6}$ M$_{\odot}$, the stars become unstable and collapse, possibly forming the first generation of cosmological black holes. Here we speculate that the claimed detection of an isotropic radio background may constitute evidence of the formation of these first supermassive black holes, since their data are compatible in spectrum and intensity with synchrotron emission from the remnants. The model proposed fulfills all observational conditions for the background, in terms of single-source strength, number of sources, far-infrared and gamma-ray emission. The observed high energy neutrino flux is consistent with our calculations in flux and spectrum. The proposal described in this paper may also explain the early formation and growth of massive bulge-less disk galaxies as derived from the massive, gaseous shell formed during the explosion prior to the formation of a supermassive black hole.
  • We study the possibility that the gamma ray emission in the Fermi bubbles observed is produced by cosmic ray electrons with a spectrum similar to Galactic cosmic rays. We argue that the cosmic ray electrons steepen near 1 TeV from $E^{-3}$ to about $E^{-4.2}$, and are partially secondaries derived from the knee-feature of normal cosmic rays. We speculate that the observed feature at $\sim 130$ GeV could essentially be due to inverse Compton emission off a pair-production peak on top of a turn-off in the $\gamma$ ray spectrum at $\sim 130$ GeV. It suggests that the knee of normal cosmic rays is the same everywhere in the Galaxy. A consequence could be that all supernovae contributing give the same cosmic ray spectrum, with the knee feature given by common stellar properties; in fact, this is consistent with the supernova theory proposed by Bisnovatyi-Kogan (1970), a magneto-rotational mechanism, if massive stars converge to common properties in terms of rotation and magnetic fields just before they explode.
  • This review focuses on high-energy cosmic rays in the PeV energy range and above. Of particular interest is the knee of the spectrum around 3 PeV and the transition from cosmic rays of Galactic origin to particles from extra-galactic sources. Our goal is to establish a baseline spectrum from 10^14 to 10^20 eV by combining the results of many measurements at different energies. In combination with measurements of the nuclear composition of the primaries, the shape of the energy spectrum places constraints on the number and spectra of sources that may contribute to the observed spectrum.
  • We describe the current situation of the data on the highest energy particles in the Universe - the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. The new results in the field come from the Telescope Array experiment in Utah, U.S.A. For this reason we concentrate on the results from this experiments and compare them to the measurements of the other two recent experiments, the High Resolution Fly's Eye and the Southern Auger Observatory
  • In this paper we review the status of the search for high-energy neutrinos from outside the solar system and discuss the implications for the origin and propagation of cosmic rays. Connections between neutrinos and gamma-rays are also discussed.
  • Context: As more and more data are collected by cosmic ray experiments such as the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array (TA), the search for the sources of the Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) continues. Already we have some hints about the sources or type of sources involved and more work is required to confirm any of this. Aims: We intend to predict the UHECR fluxes and the maximal energies of particles from two complete samples of nearby active galaxies, selected at radio and far-infrared frequencies. Also, we investigate the magnetic scattering of the UHECR path in the intervening cosmic space. Methods: We propose here a new method of searching for the sources of the UHECR in three steps, first we model the activity of the type of sources and get the flux of UHECR and a maximal energy for particle acceleration, then we model the interaction and angle deflection in the intergalactic space and finally we simulate the distribution of the cosmic rays events that can be statistically compared with future data of the cosmic rays observatories. Results: We analyzed two classes of sources, gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and Radio Galaxies (RGs). Ordering by the UHECR flux, few RGs are viable candidates, as for GRB many sources are viable candidates, requiring less scattering of the particles along their path to Earth to interpret the presently observed sky distribution. Most of the flux from RGs comes from the Southern sky, and most of the flux of particles from GRB comes from the North, although the differences are so small as to require large statistics to confirm this. The intergalactic and Galactic magnetic fields may help to distinguish the two extreme cases, also pure protons from heavy nuclei at the same energy. As a consequence flat spectrum radio sources such as 3C279 should confirm the production of UHECR in this class of sources through energetic neutrinos.
  • The cosmic ray interaction event generator Sibyll is widely used in extensive air shower simulations for cosmic ray and neutrino experiments. Charmed particle production has been added to the Monte Carlo with a phenomenological, non-perturbative model that properly accounts for charm production in the forward direction. As prompt decays of charm can become a significant background for neutrino detection, proper simulation of charmed particles is very important. We compare charmed meson and baryon production to accelerator data.
  • This is a review of the most resent results from the investigation of the Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays, particles of energy exceeding 10$^{18}$ eV. After a general introduction to the topic and a brief review of the lower energy cosmic rays and the detection methods, the two most recent experiments, the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) and the Southern Auger Observatory are described. We then concentrate on the results from these two experiments on the cosmic ray energy spectrum, the chemical composition of these cosmic rays and on the searches for their sources. We conclude with a brief analysis of the controversies in these results and the projects in development and construction that can help solve the remaining problems with these particles.
  • We present the main results on the energy spectrum and composition of the highest energy cosmic rays of energy exceeding 10$^{18}$ eV obtained by the High Resolution Fly's Eye and the Southern Auger Observatory. The current results are somewhat contradictory and raise interesting questions about the origin and character of these particles.
  • We present the current status of the IceTop air shower array on top of the IceCube neutrino detector that IceTop can use as a huge detector of TeV muons. We laos give a brief discussion of different types of air shower events that contain information on the spectrum and composition of the cosmic rays in a wide energy range.
  • One prediction of particle acceleration in the supernova remnants in the magnetic wind of exploding Wolf Rayet and Red Super Giant stars is that the final spectrum is a composition of a spectrum $E^{-7/3}$ and a polar cap component of $E^{-2}$ at the source. This polar cap component contributes to the total energy content with only a few percent, but dominates the spectrum at higher energy. The sum of both components gives spectra which curve upwards. The upturn was predicted to occur always at the same rigidity. An additional component of cosmic rays from acceleration by supernovae exploding into the Inter-Stellar Medium (ISM) adds another component for Hydrogen and for Helium. After transport the predicted spectra $J(E)$ for the wind-SN cosmic rays are $E^{-8/3}$ and $E^{-7/3}$; the sum leads to an upturn from the steeper spectrum. An upturn has now been seen. Here, we test the observations against the predictions, and show that the observed properties are consistent with the predictions. Hydrogen can be shown to also have a noticeable wind-SN-component. The observation of the upturn in the heavy element spectra being compatible with the same rigidity for all heavy elements supports the magneto-rotational mechanism for these supernovae. This interpretation predicts the observed upturn to continue to curve upwards and approach the $E^{-7/3}$ spectrum. If confirmed, this would strengthen the case that supernovae of very massive stars with magnetic winds are important sources of Galactic cosmic rays.
  • The cosmic ray interaction event generator Sibyll is widely used in extensive air shower simulations. We describe in detail the properties of Sibyll 2.1 and the differences with the original version 1.7. The major structural improvements are the possibility to have multiple soft interactions, introduction of new parton density functions, and an improved treatment of diffraction. Sibyll 2.1 gives better agreement with fixed target and collider data, especially for the inelastic cross sections and multiplicities of secondary particles. Shortcomings and suggestions for future improvements are also discussed.
  • One important prediction of acceleration of particles in the supernova caused shock in the magnetic wind of exploding Wolf Rayet and Red Super Giant stars is the production of an energetic particle component with an E^-2 spectrum, at a level of a few percent in flux at injection. After allowing for transport effects, so steepening the spectrum to E^-7/3, this component of electrons produces electromagnetic radiation and readily explains the WMAP haze from the Galactic Center region in spectrum, intensity and radial profile. This requires the diffusion time scale for cosmic rays in the Galactic Center region to be much shorter than in the Solar neighborhood: the energy for cosmic ray electrons at the transition between diffusion dominance and loss dominance is shifted to considerably higher particle energy. We predict that more precise observations will find a radio spectrum of \nu^-2/3, at higher frequencies \nu^-1, and at yet higher frequencies finally \nu^-3/2.
  • We describe the design and performance of IceTop, the air shower array on top of the IceCube neutrino detector. After the 2008/09 antarctic summer season both detectors are deployed at almost 3/4 of their design size. With the current IceTop 59 stations we can start the study of showers of energy well above 10$^{17}$ eV. The paper also describes the first results from IceTop and our plans to study the cosmic ray composition using several different types of analysis.
  • We examine the anisotropy of the arrival directions of twenty seven ultra high energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Collaboration. We confirm the anisotropy of the arrival directions of these events and find a significant correlation with the updated definition of the supergalactic plane at distances up to 70 Mpc, A Monte Carlo calculation of isotropic source distribution suggests a chance probability for isotropic event arrival direction distribution of 2-6$\times10^{-4}$.
  • We present a Monte-Carlo (MC) calculation of the propagation of cosmic ray protons in the Galaxy for energies above 1 PeV. We discuss the relative strengths of competing effects such as parallel/perpendicular diffusion and drifts in toy models of the Galaxy. We compare our estimates with the results of the MC calculation for the toy models and then we apply the MC calculation to a few more realistic models of the Galactic magnetic field. We study the containment times in different models of the magnetic field in order to understand which one may be consistent with the low energy data.
  • We present the results of a numerical simulation of propagation of cosmic rays with energy above $10^{15}$ eV in a complex magnetic field, made in general of a large scale component and a turbulent component. Several configurations are investigated that may represent specific aspects of a realistic magnetic field of the Galaxy, though the main purpose of this investigation is not to achieve a realistic description of the propagation in the Galaxy, but rather to assess the role of several effects that define the complex problem of propagation. Our simulations of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy will be presented in Paper II. We identified several effects that are difficult to interpret in a purely diffusive approach and that play a crucial role in the propagation of cosmic rays in the complex magnetic field of the Galaxy. We discuss at length the problem of the extrapolation of our results to much lower energies where data are available on the confinement time of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The confinement time and its dependence on particles' rigidity are crucial ingredients for 1) relating the source spectrum to the observed cosmic ray spectrum; 2) quantifying the production of light elements by spallation; 3) predicting the anisotropy as a function of energy.
  • The HESS instrument has observed a diffuse flux of ~ TeV gamma rays from a large solid angle around the Galactic center (GC). This emission is correlated with the distribution of gas in the region suggesting that the gamma rays originate in collisions between cosmic ray hadrons (CRHs) and ambient matter. Of particular interest, HESS has detected gamma rays from the Sagittarius (Sgr) B Molecular Cloud Complex. Prompted by the suggestion of a hadronic origin for the gamma rays, we have examined archival 330 and 74 MHz Very Large Array radio data and 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey data covering Sgr B, looking for synchrotron emission from secondary electrons and positrons (expected to be created in the same interactions that supply the observed gamma rays). Intriguingly, we have uncovered non-thermal emission, but at a level exceeding expectation. Adding to the overall picture, recent observations by the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope show that the cosmic ray ionization rate is ten times greater in the Sgr B2 region of Sgr B than the local value. Lastly, Sgr B2 is also a very bright X-ray source. We examine scenarios for the spectra of CRHs and/or primary electrons that would reconcile all these different data. We determine that (i) a hard (~ E^-2.2), high-energy (> TeV) population CRHs is unavoidably required by the HESS gamma ray data and (ii) the remaining broad-band, non-thermal phenomenology is explained either by a rather steep (~ E^-2.9) spectrum of primary electrons or a (~ E^-2.7) population of CRHs. No single, power-law population of either leptons or hadrons can explain the totality of broadband, non-thermal Sgr B phenomenology.
  • We discuss the region of transition between galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays. The exact shapes and compositions of these two components contains information about important parameters of powerful astrophysical sources and the conditions in extragalactic space as well as for the cosmological evolution of the sources of high energy cosmic rays. Several types of experimental data, including the exact shape of the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, their chemical composition and their anisotropy, and the fluxes of cosmogenic neutrinos have to be included in the solution of this problem.
  • We discuss the relation between the acceleration spectra of extragalactic cosmic ray protons and the luminosity and cosmological evolution of their sources and the production of ultra high energy cosmogenic neutrinos in their propagation from the sources to us.