• Using a new, high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulation of a Milky Way-type (MW-type) galaxy, we explore how a merger-rich assembly history affects the mass budget of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). We examine a MW-mass halo at the present epoch whose evolution is characterized by several major mergers to isolate the importance of merger history on black hole accretion. This study is an extension of Bellovary et. al. 2013, which analyzed the accretion of high mass, high redshift galaxies and their central black holes, and found that the gas content of the central black hole reflects what is accreted by the host galaxy halo. In this study, we find that a merger-rich galaxy will have a central SMBH preferentially fed by merger gas. Moreover, we find that nearly 30$\%$ of the accreted mass budget of the SMBH enters the galaxy through the two major mergers in its history, which may account for the increase of merger-gas fueling the SMBH. Through an investigation of the angular momentum of the gas entering the host and its SMBH, we determine that merger gas enters the galaxy with lower angular momentum compared to smooth accretion, partially accounting for the preferential fueling witnessed in the SMBH. In addition, the presence of mergers, particularly major mergers, also helps funnel low angular momentum gas more readily to the center of the galaxy. Our results imply that galaxy mergers play an important role in feeding the SMBH in MW-type galaxies with merger-rich histories. Our results imply that galaxy mergers play an important role in feeding the SMBH in MW-type galaxies with merger-rich histories.
  • We present a novel implementation of supermassive black hole (SMBH) formation, dynamics, and accretion in the massively parallel tree+SPH code, ChaNGa. This approach improves the modeling of SMBHs in fully cosmological simulations, allowing for a more de- tailed analysis of SMBH-galaxy co-evolution throughout cosmic time. Our scheme includes novel, physically motivated models for SMBH formation, dynamics and sinking timescales within galaxies, and SMBH accretion of rotationally supported gas. The sub-grid parameters that regulate star formation (SF) and feedback from SMBHs and SNe are optimized against a comprehensive set of z = 0 galaxy scaling relations using a novel, multi-dimensional parameter search. We have incorporated our new SMBH implementation and parameter optimization into a new set of high resolution, large-scale cosmological simulations called Romulus. We present initial results from our flagship simulation, Romulus25, showing that our SMBH model results in SF efficiency, SMBH masses, and global SF and SMBH accretion histories at high redshift that are consistent with observations. We discuss the importance of SMBH physics in shaping the evolution of massive galaxies and show how SMBH feedback is much more effective at regulating star formation compared to SNe feedback in this regime. Further, we show how each aspect of our SMBH model impacts this evolution compared to more common approaches. Finally, we present a science application of this scheme studying the properties and time evolution of an example dual AGN system, highlighting how our approach allows simulations to better study galaxy interactions and SMBH mergers in the context of galaxy-BH co-evolution.
  • The sources that reionized the universe are still unknown, but likely candidates are faint but numerous galaxies. In this paper we present results from running a high resolution, uniform volume simulation, the Vulcan, to predict the number densities of undetectable, faint galaxies and their escape fractions of ionizing radiation, $f_\mathrm{esc}$, during reionization. Our approach combines a high spatial resolution, a realistic treatment of feedback and hydro processes, a strict threshold for minimum number of resolution elements per galaxy, and a converged measurement of $f_\mathrm{esc}$. We calibrate our physical model using a novel approach to create realistic galaxies at z=0, so the simulation is predictive at high redshifts. With this approach we can (1) robustly predict the evolution of the galaxy UV luminosity function at faint magnitudes down to $M_\mathrm{UV}$~-15, two magnitudes fainter than observations, and (2) estimate $f_\mathrm{esc}$ over a large range of galaxy masses based on the detailed stellar and gas distributions in resolved galaxies. We find steep faint end slopes, implying high number densities of faint galaxies, and the dependence of $f_\mathrm{esc}$ on the UV magnitude of a galaxy, given by the power-law: log $f_\mathrm{esc} = (0.51 \pm 0.04)M_\mathrm{UV} + 7.3 \pm 0.8$, with the faint population having $f_\mathrm{esc}$~35%. Convolving the UV luminosity function with $f_\mathrm{esc}$($M_\mathrm{UV}$), we find an ionizing emissivity that is (1) dominated by the faintest galaxies and (2) reionizes the universe at the appropriate rate, consistent with observational constraints of the ionizing emissivity and the optical depth to the decoupling surface tau_es, without the need for additional sources of ionizing radiation.
  • We show how the interplay between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and merger history determines whether a galaxy quenches star formation at high redshift. We first simulate, in a full cosmological context, a galaxy of total dynamical mass $10^{12}\,M_{\odot}$ at $z=2$. Then we systematically alter the accretion history of the galaxy by minimally changing the linear overdensity in the initial conditions. This "genetic modification" approach allows the generation of three sets of $\Lambda$CDM initial conditions leading to maximum merger ratios of 1:10, 1:5 and 2:3 respectively. The changes leave the final halo mass, large scale structure and local environment unchanged, providing a controlled numerical experiment. Interaction between the AGN physics and mergers in the three cases lead respectively to a star-forming, temporarily-quenched and permanently-quenched galaxy. However the differences do not primarily lie in the black hole accretion rates, but in the kinetic effects of the merger: the galaxy is resilient against AGN feedback unless its gaseous disk is first disrupted. Typical accretion rates are comparable in the three cases, falling below $0.1\,M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$, equivalent to around $2\%$ of the Eddington rate or $10^{-3}$ times the pre-quenching star formation rate, in agreement with observations. This low level of black hole accretion can be sustained even when there is insufficient dense cold gas for star formation. Conversely, supernova feedback is too distributed to generate outflows in high-mass systems, and cannot maintain quenching over periods longer than the halo gas cooling time.
  • Using $N$-body+SPH simulations of galaxies falling into a cluster, we study the evolution of their radial density profiles. When evolved in isolation, galaxies develop a type~II (down-bending) profile. In the cluster, the evolution of the profile depends on the minimum cluster-centric radius the galaxy reaches, which controls the degree of ram pressure stripping. If the galaxy falls to $\sim 50\%$ of the virial radius, then the profile remains type~II, but if the galaxy reaches down to $\sim 20\%$ of the virial radius the break weakens and the profile becomes more type~I like. The velocity dispersions are only slightly increased in the cluster simulations compared with the isolated galaxy; random motion therefore cannot be responsible for redistributing material sufficiently to cause the change in the profile type. Instead we find that the joint action of radial migration driven by tidally-induced spirals and the outside-in quenching of star formation due to ram pressure stripping alters the density profile. As a result, this model predicts a flattening of the age profiles amongst cluster lenticulars with type~I profiles, which can be observationally tested. %
  • The thermal and chemical properties of the hot diffuse intragroup medium (IGrM) provide important constraints on the feedback processes associated with massive galaxy formation and evolution. Here we explore these constraints via a detailed analysis of the global properties of simulated z<3 galaxy groups from a cosmological simulation that includes a well-constrained prescription for stellar/supernovae-powered galactic outflows but no AGN feedback. Our aims are to (a) establish a baseline against which we will compare future models; (b) identify model successes due to stellar/supernovae-powered outflows; and (c) pinpoint features that signal the need for, and constrain the nature of, AGN feedback. Our simulation successfully reproduces key observed z=0 group IGrM properties, including the various X-ray Lx - Tx - entropy scaling relations, for all but the most massive groups. The z<1 redshift evolution of these also agree with observations. Contrary to expectations, the simulated groups' IGrM does not suffer catastrophic cooling. Yet, the z=0 group stellar mass is ~ 2X too large. This is due to the build-up of cold gas in the massive galaxies before they are incorporated inside groups. This in turn indicates that other feedback mechanisms must activate in real galaxies once their stellar masses grow to a few X 10^{10} M_sun. We show that these must be powerful enough to expel a significant fraction of the gas from the galactic halos. Gentle maintenance-mode (quenching) AGN feedback, as seen in galaxy clusters, will not do. Just as importantly, we find that the stellar/supernovae-powered winds are essential for understanding the IGrM metal abundances. Our simulation is able to reproduce the observed relationship between the global IGrM iron and silicon abundance and the group X-ray temperature, and these results ought to be relatively insensitive to the addition of AGN feedback.
  • We study the effect of warm dark matter (WDM) on hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation as part of the Making Galaxies in a Cosmological Context (MaGICC) project. We simulate three different galaxies using three WDM candidates of 1, 2 and 5 keV and compare results with pure cold dark matter simulations. WDM slightly reduces star formation and produces less centrally concentrated stellar profiles. These effects are most evident for the 1 keV candidate but almost disappear for $m_{\mathrm{WDM}}>2$ keV. All simulations form similar stellar discs independent of WDM particle mass. In particular, the disc scale length does not change when WDM is considered. The reduced amount of star formation in the case of 1 keV particles is due to the effects of WDM on merging satellites which are on average less concentrated and less gas rich. The altered satellites cause a reduced starburst during mergers because they trigger weaker disc instabilities in the main galaxy. Nevertheless we show that disc galaxy evolution is much more sensitive to stellar feedback than it is to WDM candidate mass. Overall we find that WDM, especially when restricted to current observational constraints ($m_{\mathrm{WDM}}>2$ keV), has a minor impact on disc galaxy formation.
  • Using high resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of Milky Way-massed disk galaxies, we demonstrate that supernovae feedback and tidal stripping lower the central masses of bright (-15 < M_V < -8) satellite galaxies. These simulations resolve high density regions, comparable to giant molecular clouds, where stars form. This resolution allows us to adopt a prescription for H_2 formation and destruction that ties star formation to the presence of shielded, molecular gas. Before infall, supernova feedback from the clumpy, bursty star formation captured by this physically motivated model leads to reduced dark matter (DM) densities and shallower inner density profiles in the massive satellite progenitors (Mvir > 10^9 Msun, Mstar > 10^7 Msun) compared to DM-only simulations. The progenitors of the lower mass satellites are unable to maintain bursty star formation histories, due to both heating at reionization and gas loss from initial star forming events, preserving the steep inner density profile predicted by DM-only simulations. After infall, tidal stripping acts to further reduce the central densities of the luminous satellites, particularly those that enter with cored dark matter halos, increasing the discrepancy in the central masses predicted by baryon+DM and DM-only simulations. We show that DM-only simulations, which neglect the baryonic effects described in this work, produce denser satellites with larger central velocities. We provide a simple correction to the central DM mass predicted for satellites by DM-only simulations. We conclude that DM-only simulations should be used with great caution when interpreting kinematic observations of the Milky Way's dwarf satellites.
  • We present the ensemble properties of 31 comets (27 resolved and 4 unresolved) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This sample of comets represents about 1 comet per 10 million SDSS photometric objects. Five-band (u,g,r,i,z) photometry is used to determine the comets' colors, sizes, surface brightness profiles, and rates of dust production in terms of the Af{\rho} formalism. We find that the cumulative luminosity function for the Jupiter Family Comets in our sample is well fit by a power law of the form N(< H) \propto 10(0.49\pm0.05)H for H < 18, with evidence of a much shallower fit N(< H) \propto 10(0.19\pm0.03)H for the faint (14.5 < H < 18) comets. The resolved comets show an extremely narrow distribution of colors (0.57 \pm 0.05 in g - r for example), which are statistically indistinguishable from that of the Jupiter Trojans. Further, there is no evidence of correlation between color and physical, dynamical, or observational parameters for the observed comets.
  • A clear prediction of the Cold Dark Matter model is the existence of cuspy dark matter halo density profiles on all mass scales. This is not in agreement with the observed rotation curves of spiral galaxies, challenging on small scales the otherwise successful CDM paradigm. In this work we employ high resolution cosmological hydro-dynamical simulations to study the effects of dissipative processes on the inner distribution of dark matter in Milky-Way like objects (M~1e12 Msun). Our simulations include supernova feedback, and the effects of the radiation pressure of massive stars before they explode as supernovae. The increased stellar feedback results in the expansion of the dark matter halo instead of contraction with respect to N-body simulations. Baryons are able to erase the dark matter cuspy distribution creating a flat, cored, dark matter density profile in the central several kpc of a massive Milky-Way like halo. The profile is well fit by a Burkert profile, with fitting parameters consistent with the observations. In addition, we obtain flat rotation curves as well as extended, exponential stellar disk profiles. While the stellar disk we obtain is still partially too thick to resemble the MW thin disk, this pilot study shows that there is enough energy available in the baryonic component to alter the dark matter distribution even in massive disc galaxies, providing a possible solution to the long standing problem of cusps vs. cores.
  • We perform SPH+N-body cosmological simulations of massive disk galaxies, including a formalism for black hole seed formation and growth, and find that satellite galaxies containing supermassive black hole seeds are often stripped as they merge with the primary galaxy. These events naturally create a population of "wandering" black holes that are the remnants of stripped satellite cores; galaxies like the Milky Way may host 5 -- 15 of these objects within their halos. The satellites that harbor black hole seeds are comparable to Local Group dwarf galaxies such as the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds; these galaxies are promising candidates to host nearby intermediate mass black holes. Provided that these wandering black holes retain a gaseous accretion disk from their host dwarf galaxy, they give a physical explanation for the origin and observed properties of some recently discovered off-nuclear ultraluminous X-ray sources such as HLX-1.
  • A sample of very high resolution cosmological disk galaxy simulations is used to investigate the evolution of galaxy disk sizes back to redshift 1 within the Lambda CDM cosmology. Artificial images in the rest frame B band are generated, allowing for a measurement of disk scale lengths using surface brightness profiles as observations would, and avoiding any assumption that light must follow mass as previous models have assumed. We demonstrate that these simulated disks are an excellent match to the observed magnitude - size relation for both local disks, and for disks at z=1 in the magnitude/mass range of overlap. We disentangle the evolution seen in the population as a whole from the evolution of individual disk galaxies. In agreement with observations, our simulated disks undergo roughly 1.5 magnitudes/arcsec^2 of surface brightness dimming since z=1. We find evidence that evolution in the magnitude - size plane varies by mass, such that galaxies with M* > 10^9 M_sun undergo more evolution in size than luminosity, while dwarf galaxies tend to evolve potentially more in luminosity. The disks grow in such a way as to stay on roughly the same stellar mass - size relation with time. Finally, due to an evolving stellar mass - SFR relation, a galaxy at a given stellar mass (or size) at z=1 will reside in a more massive halo and have a higher SFR, and thus a higher luminosity, than a counterpart of the same stellar mass at z=0.
  • We summarize recent developments in the use of spectral methods for analyzing large numbers of orbits in N-body simulations to obtain insights into the global phase space structure of dark matter halos. The fundamental frequencies of oscillation of orbits can be used to understand the physical mechanism by which the shapes of dark matter halos evolve in response to the growth of central baryonic components. Halos change shape primarily because individual orbits change their shapes adiabatically in response to the growth of a baryonic component, with those at small radii become preferentially rounder. Chaotic scattering of orbits occurs only when the central point mass is very compact and is equally effective for centrophobic long-axis tube orbits as it is for centrophilic box orbits.
  • We investigate the formation of the stellar halos of four simulated disk galaxies using high resolution, cosmological SPH + N-Body simulations. These simulations include a self-consistent treatment of all the major physical processes involved in galaxy formation. The simulated galaxies presented here each have a total mass of ~10^12 M_sun, but span a range of merger histories. These simulations allow us to study the competing importance of in-situ star formation (stars formed in the primary galaxy) and accretion of stars from subhalos in the building of stellar halos in a LambdaCDM universe. All four simulated galaxies are surrounded by a stellar halo, whose inner regions (r < 20 kpc) contain both accreted stars, and an in-situ stellar population. The outer regions of the galaxies' halos were assembled through pure accretion and disruption of satellites. Most of the in-situ halo stars formed at high redshift out of smoothly accreted cold gas in the inner 1 kpc of the galaxies' potential wells, possibly as part of their primordial disks. These stars were displaced from their central locations into the halos through a succession of major mergers. We find that the two galaxies with recently quiescent merger histories have a higher fraction of in-situ stars (~20-50%) in their inner halos than the two galaxies with many recent mergers (~5-10% in-situ fraction). Observational studies concentrating on stellar populations in the inner halo of the Milky Way will be the most affected by the presence of in-situ stars with halo kinematics, as we find that their existence in the inner few tens of kpc is a generic feature of galaxy formation.
  • Using effective temperature and metallicity derived from SDSS spectra for ~60,000 F and G type main sequence stars (0.2<g-r<0.6), we develop polynomial models for estimating these parameters from the SDSS u-g and g-r colors. We apply this method to SDSS photometric data for about 2 million F/G stars and measure the unbiased metallicity distribution for a complete volume-limited sample of stars at distances between 500 pc and 8 kpc. The metallicity distribution can be exquisitely modeled using two components with a spatially varying number ratio, that correspond to disk and halo. The two components also possess the kinematics expected for disk and halo stars. The metallicity of the halo component is spatially invariant, while the median disk metallicity smoothly decreases with distance from the Galactic plane from -0.6 at 500 pc to -0.8 beyond several kpc. The absence of a correlation between metallicity and kinematics for disk stars is in a conflict with the traditional decomposition in terms of thin and thick disks. We detect coherent substructures in the kinematics--metallicity space, such as the Monoceros stream, which rotates faster than the LSR, and has a median metallicity of [Fe/H]=-0.96, with an rms scatter of only ~0.15 dex. We extrapolate our results to the performance expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and estimate that the LSST will obtain metallicity measurements accurate to 0.2 dex or better, with proper motion measurements accurate to ~0.2 mas/yr, for about 200 million F/G dwarf stars within a distance limit of ~100 kpc (g<23.5). [abridged]
  • We present an analysis of star formation and feedback recipes appropriate for galactic smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Using an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy, we constrain these recipes based on well-established observational results. Our star formation recipe is based on that of Katz (1992) with the additional inclusion of physically motivated supernova feedback recipes. We propose a new feedback recipe in which type II supernovae are modelled using an analytical treatment of blastwaves. With this feedback mechanism and a tuning of other star formation parameters, the star formation in our isolated Milky Way-like galaxy is constant and follows the slope and normalisation of the observed Schmidt law. In addition, we reproduce the low density cutoff and filamentary structure of star formation observed in disk galaxies. Our final recipe will enable better comparison of cosmological N-body simulations with observations.
  • We examine recent suggestions that substructure in cold dark matter (CDM) halos may be in conflict with the presence of thin, dynamically fragile stellar disks. N-body simulations of an isolated disk/bulge/halo model of the Milky Way that includes several hundred dark matter satellites with masses, densities and orbits derived from high-resolution cosmological CDM simulations indicate that substructure at $z=0$ plays only a minor dynamical role in the heating of the disk over several Gyrs. This is because the orbits of satellites in present-day CDM halos seldom take them near the disk, where their tidal effects are greatest. Unless the effects of substructure are very different at earlier times, our models suggest that substructure might not preclude virialized CDM halos from being acceptable hosts of thin stellar disks like that of the Milky Way.
  • We use a cosmological simulation of the Local Group to make quantitative and speculative predictions for direct detection experiments. Cold dark matter (CDM) halos form via a complex series of mergers, accretion events and violent relaxation which precludes the formation of significant caustic features predicted by axially symmetric collapse. The halo density profiles are combined with observational constraints on the galactic mass distribution to constrain the local density of cold dark matter to lie in the range 0.18 <~ rho_CDM(R_solar)/GeV cm^-3 <~ 0.30. In velocity space, coherent streams of dark matter from tidally disrupted halos fill the halo and provide a tracer of the merging hierarchy. The particle velocities within triaxial CDM halos cannot be approximated by a simple Maxwellian distribution and is radially biased at the solar position. The detailed phase space structure within the solar system will depend on the early merger history of the progenitor halos and the importance of major mergers over accretion dominated growth. We follow the formation of a ``Draco'' sized dSph halo of mass 10^8M_solar with several million particles and high force accuracy. Its internal structure and substructure resembles that of galactic or cluster mass halos: the density profile has a singular central cusp and it contains thousands of sub-halos orbiting within its virial radius demonstrating a self-similar nature to collisionless dark matter sub-clustering. The singular cores of substructure halos always survive complete tidal disruption although mass loss is continuous and rapid. Extrapolating wildly to earth mass halos with velocity dispersion of 1 m s^-1 (roughly equal to the free streaming scale for neutralinos) we find that most of the dark matter may remain attached to bound subhalos. (Abridged)
  • Can N-body simulations reliably determine the structural properties of dark matter halos? Focussing on a Virgo-sized galaxy cluster, we increase the resolution of current ``high resolution simulations'' by almost an order of magnitude to examine the convergence of the important physical quantities. We have 4 million particles within the cluster and force resolution 0.5 kpc/h (0.05% of the virial radius). The central density profile has a logarithmic slope of -1.5, as found in lower resolution studies of the same halo, indicating that the profile has converged to the ``physical'' limit down to scales of a few kpc. Also the abundance of substructure is consistent with that derived from lower resolution runs; on the scales explored, the mass and circular velocity functions are close to power laws of exponents ~ -1.9 and -4. Overmerging appears to be globally unimportant for suhalos with circular velocities > 100 km/s. We can trace most of the cluster progenitors from z=3 to the present; the central object (the dark matter analog of a cD galaxy)is assembled between z=3 and 1 from the merging of a dozen halos with v_circ \sim 300 km/s. The mean circular velocity of the subhalos decreases by ~ 20% over 5 billion years, due to tidal mass loss. The velocity dispersions of halos and dark matter globally agree within 10%, but the halos are spatially anti-biased, and, in the very central region of the cluster, they show positive velocity bias; however, this effect appears to depend on numerical resolution.