• Common-sense and background knowledge is required to understand natural language, but in most neural natural language understanding (NLU) systems, this knowledge must be acquired from training corpora during learning, and then it is static at test time. We introduce a new architecture for the dynamic integration of explicit background knowledge in NLU models. A general-purpose reading module reads background knowledge in the form of free-text statements (together with task-specific text inputs) and yields refined word representations to a task-specific NLU architecture that reprocesses the task inputs with these representations. Experiments on document question answering (DQA) and recognizing textual entailment (RTE) demonstrate the effectiveness and flexibility of the approach. Analysis shows that our model learns to exploit knowledge in a semantically appropriate way.
  • We formulate sequence to sequence transduction as a noisy channel decoding problem and use recurrent neural networks to parameterise the source and channel models. Unlike direct models which can suffer from explaining-away effects during training, noisy channel models must produce outputs that explain their inputs, and their component models can be trained with not only paired training samples but also unpaired samples from the marginal output distribution. Using a latent variable to control how much of the conditioning sequence the channel model needs to read in order to generate a subsequent symbol, we obtain a tractable and effective beam search decoder. Experimental results on abstractive sentence summarisation, morphological inflection, and machine translation show that noisy channel models outperform direct models, and that they significantly benefit from increased amounts of unpaired output data that direct models cannot easily use.
  • We present a novel semi-supervised approach for sequence transduction and apply it to semantic parsing. The unsupervised component is based on a generative model in which latent sentences generate the unpaired logical forms. We apply this method to a number of semantic parsing tasks focusing on domains with limited access to labelled training data and extend those datasets with synthetically generated logical forms.
  • Many language generation tasks require the production of text conditioned on both structured and unstructured inputs. We present a novel neural network architecture which generates an output sequence conditioned on an arbitrary number of input functions. Crucially, our approach allows both the choice of conditioning context and the granularity of generation, for example characters or tokens, to be marginalised, thus permitting scalable and effective training. Using this framework, we address the problem of generating programming code from a mixed natural language and structured specification. We create two new data sets for this paradigm derived from the collectible trading card games Magic the Gathering and Hearthstone. On these, and a third preexisting corpus, we demonstrate that marginalising multiple predictors allows our model to outperform strong benchmarks.
  • As recurrent neural networks become larger and deeper, training times for single networks are rising into weeks or even months. As such there is a significant incentive to improve the performance and scalability of these networks. While GPUs have become the hardware of choice for training and deploying recurrent models, the implementations employed often make use of only basic optimizations for these architectures. In this article we demonstrate that by exposing parallelism between operations within the network, an order of magnitude speedup across a range of network sizes can be achieved over a naive implementation. We describe three stages of optimization that have been incorporated into the fifth release of NVIDIA's cuDNN: firstly optimizing a single cell, secondly a single layer, and thirdly the entire network.
  • While most approaches to automatically recognizing entailment relations have used classifiers employing hand engineered features derived from complex natural language processing pipelines, in practice their performance has been only slightly better than bag-of-word pair classifiers using only lexical similarity. The only attempt so far to build an end-to-end differentiable neural network for entailment failed to outperform such a simple similarity classifier. In this paper, we propose a neural model that reads two sentences to determine entailment using long short-term memory units. We extend this model with a word-by-word neural attention mechanism that encourages reasoning over entailments of pairs of words and phrases. Furthermore, we present a qualitative analysis of attention weights produced by this model, demonstrating such reasoning capabilities. On a large entailment dataset this model outperforms the previous best neural model and a classifier with engineered features by a substantial margin. It is the first generic end-to-end differentiable system that achieves state-of-the-art accuracy on a textual entailment dataset.
  • Teaching machines to read natural language documents remains an elusive challenge. Machine reading systems can be tested on their ability to answer questions posed on the contents of documents that they have seen, but until now large scale training and test datasets have been missing for this type of evaluation. In this work we define a new methodology that resolves this bottleneck and provides large scale supervised reading comprehension data. This allows us to develop a class of attention based deep neural networks that learn to read real documents and answer complex questions with minimal prior knowledge of language structure.
  • We present a probabilistic model that simultaneously learns alignments and distributed representations for bilingual data. By marginalizing over word alignments the model captures a larger semantic context than prior work relying on hard alignments. The advantage of this approach is demonstrated in a cross-lingual classification task, where we outperform the prior published state of the art.
  • A common approach to data analysis involves understanding and manipulating succinct representations of data. In earlier work, we put forward a succinct representation system for relational data called factorised databases and reported on the main-memory query engine FDB for select-project-join queries on such databases. In this paper, we extend FDB to support a larger class of practical queries with aggregates and ordering. This requires novel optimisation and evaluation techniques. We show how factorisation coupled with partial aggregation can effectively reduce the number of operations needed for query evaluation. We also show how factorisations of query results can support enumeration of tuples in desired orders as efficiently as listing them from the unfactorised, sorted results. We experimentally observe that FDB can outperform off-the-shelf relational engines by orders of magnitude.