• A seed in a word is a relaxed version of a period in which the occurrences of the repeating subword may overlap. We show a linear-time algorithm computing a linear-size representation of all the seeds of a word (the number of seeds might be quadratic). In particular, one can easily derive the shortest seed and the number of seeds from our representation. Thus, we solve an open problem stated in the survey by Smyth (2000) and improve upon a previous O(n log n) algorithm by Iliopoulos, Moore, and Park (1996). Our approach is based on combinatorial relations between seeds and subword complexity (used here for the first time in context of seeds). In the previous papers, the compact representation of seeds consisted of two independent parts operating on the suffix tree of the word and the suffix tree of the reverse of the word, respectively. Our second contribution is a simpler representation of all seeds which avoids dealing with the reversed word. A preliminary version of this work, with a much more complex algorithm constructing the earlier representation of seeds, was presented at the 23rd Annual ACM-SIAM Symposium of Discrete Algorithms (SODA 2012).
  • In the Longest Common Factor with $k$ Mismatches (LCF$_k$) problem, we are given two strings $X$ and $Y$ of total length $n$, and we are asked to find a pair of maximal-length factors, one of $X$ and the other of $Y$, such that their Hamming distance is at most $k$. Thankachan et al. show that this problem can be solved in $\mathcal{O}(n \log^k n)$ time and $\mathcal{O}(n)$ space for constant $k$. We consider the LCF$_k$($\ell$) problem in which we assume that the sought factors have length at least $\ell$, and the LCF$_k$($\ell$) problem for $\ell=\Omega(\log^{2k+2} n)$, which we call the Long LCF$_k$ problem. We use difference covers to reduce the Long LCF$_k$ problem to a task involving $m=\mathcal{O}(n/\log^{k+1}n)$ synchronized factors. The latter can be solved in $\mathcal{O}(m \log^{k+1}m)$ time, which results in a linear-time algorithm for Long LCF$_k$. In general, our solution to LCF$_k$($\ell$) for arbitrary $\ell$ takes $\mathcal{O}(n + n \log^{k+1} n/\sqrt{\ell})$ time.
  • The order-preserving model (op-model, in short) was introduced quite recently but has already attracted significant attention because of its applications in data analysis. We introduce several types of periods in this setting (op-periods). Then we give algorithms to compute these periods in time $O(n)$, $O(n\log\log n)$, $O(n \log^2 \log n/\log \log \log n)$, $O(n\log n)$ depending on the type of periodicity. In the most general variant the number of different periods can be as big as $\Omega(n^2)$, and a compact representation is needed. Our algorithms require novel combinatorial insight into the properties of such periods.
  • We investigate the function $L(h,p,q)$, called here the threshold function, related to periodicity of partial words (words with holes). The value $L(h,p,q)$ is defined as the minimum length threshold which guarantees that a natural extension of the periodicity lemma is valid for partial words with $h$ holes and (strong) periods $p,q$. We show how to evaluate the threshold function in $O(\log p + \log q)$ time, which is an improvement upon the best previously known $O(p+q)$-time algorithm. In a series of papers, the formulae for the threshold function, in terms of $p$ and $q$, were provided for each fixed $h \le 7$. We demystify the generic structure of such formulae, and for each value $h$ we express the threshold function in terms of a piecewise-linear function with $O(h)$ pieces.
  • Longest common extension queries (LCE queries) and runs are ubiquitous in algorithmic stringology. Linear-time algorithms computing runs and preprocessing for constant-time LCE queries have been known for over a decade. However, these algorithms assume a linearly-sortable integer alphabet. A recent breakthrough paper by Bannai et.\ al.\ (SODA 2015) showed a link between the two notions: all the runs in a string can be computed via a linear number of LCE queries. The first to consider these problems over a general ordered alphabet was Kosolobov (\emph{Inf.\ Process.\ Lett.}, 2016), who presented an $O(n (\log n)^{2/3})$-time algorithm for answering $O(n)$ LCE queries. This result was improved by Gawrychowski et.\ al.\ (accepted to CPM 2016) to $O(n \log \log n)$ time. In this work we note a special \emph{non-crossing} property of LCE queries asked in the runs computation. We show that any $n$ such non-crossing queries can be answered on-line in $O(n \alpha(n))$ time, which yields an $O(n \alpha(n))$-time algorithm for computing runs.
  • The combinatorics of squares in a word depends on how the equivalence of halves of the square is defined. We consider Abelian squares, parameterized squares, and order-preserving squares. The word $uv$ is an Abelian (parameterized, order-preserving) square if $u$ and $v$ are equivalent in the Abelian (parameterized, order-preserving) sense. The maximum number of ordinary squares in a word is known to be asymptotically linear, but the exact bound is still investigated. We present several results on the maximum number of distinct squares for nonstandard subword equivalence relations. Let $\mathit{SQ}_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma)$ and $\mathit{SQ}'_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma)$ denote the maximum number of Abelian squares in a word of length $n$ over an alphabet of size $\sigma$, which are distinct as words and which are nonequivalent in the Abelian sense, respectively. For $\sigma\ge 2$ we prove that $\mathit{SQ}_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma)=\Theta(n^2)$, $\mathit{SQ}'_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma)=\Omega(n^{3/2})$ and $\mathit{SQ}'_{\mathrm{Abel}}(n,\sigma) = O(n^{11/6})$. We also give linear bounds for parameterized and order-preserving squares for alphabets of constant size: $\mathit{SQ}_{\mathrm{param}}(n,O(1))=\Theta(n)$, $\mathit{SQ}_{\mathrm{op}}(n,O(1))=\Theta(n)$. The upper bounds have quadratic dependence on the alphabet size for order-preserving squares and exponential dependence for parameterized squares. As a side result we construct infinite words over the smallest alphabet which avoid nontrivial order-preserving squares and nontrivial parameterized cubes (nontrivial parameterized squares cannot be avoided in an infinite word).
  • Longest common extension queries (often called longest common prefix queries) constitute a fundamental building block in multiple string algorithms, for example computing runs and approximate pattern matching. We show that a sequence of $q$ LCE queries for a string of size $n$ over a general ordered alphabet can be realized in $O(q \log \log n+n\log^*n)$ time making only $O(q+n)$ symbol comparisons. Consequently, all runs in a string over a general ordered alphabet can be computed in $O(n \log \log n)$ time making $O(n)$ symbol comparisons. Our results improve upon a solution by Kosolobov (Information Processing Letters, 2016), who gave an algorithm with $O(n \log^{2/3} n)$ running time and conjectured that $O(n)$ time is possible. We make a significant progress towards resolving this conjecture. Our techniques extend to the case of general unordered alphabets, when the time increases to $O(q\log n + n\log^*n)$. The main tools are difference covers and the disjoint-sets data structure.
  • We study a variation of the classical Shortest Common Superstring (SCS) problem in which a shortest superstring of a finite set of strings $S$ is sought containing as a factor every string of $S$ or its reversal. We call this problem Shortest Common Superstring with Reversals (SCS-R). This problem has been introduced by Jiang et al., who designed a greedy-like algorithm with length approximation ratio $4$. In this paper, we show that a natural adaptation of the classical greedy algorithm for SCS has (optimal) compression ratio $\frac12$, i.e., the sum of the overlaps in the output string is at least half the sum of the overlaps in an optimal solution. We also provide a linear-time implementation of our algorithm.
  • We consider the problem of computing a shortest solid cover of an indeterminate string. An indeterminate string may contain non-solid symbols, each of which specifies a subset of the alphabet that could be present at the corresponding position. We also consider covering partial words, which are a special case of indeterminate strings where each non-solid symbol is a don't care symbol. We prove that indeterminate string covering problem and partial word covering problem are NP-complete for binary alphabet and show that both problems are fixed-parameter tractable with respect to $k$, the number of non-solid symbols. For the indeterminate string covering problem we obtain a $2^{O(k \log k)} + n k^{O(1)}$-time algorithm. For the partial word covering problem we obtain a $2^{O(\sqrt{k}\log k)} + nk^{O(1)}$-time algorithm. We prove that, unless the Exponential Time Hypothesis is false, no $2^{o(\sqrt{k})} n^{O(1)}$-time solution exists for either problem, which shows that our algorithm for this case is close to optimal. We also present an algorithm for both problems which is feasible in practice.
  • We consider several types of internal queries: questions about subwords of a text. As the main tool we develop an optimal data structure for the problem called here internal pattern matching. This data structure provides constant-time answers to queries about occurrences of one subword $x$ in another subword $y$ of a given text, assuming that $|y|=\mathcal{O}(|x|)$, which allows for a constant-space representation of all occurrences. This problem can be viewed as a natural extension of the well-studied pattern matching problem. The data structure has linear size and admits a linear-time construction algorithm. Using the solution to the internal pattern matching problem, we obtain very efficient data structures answering queries about: primitivity of subwords, periods of subwords, general substring compression, and cyclic equivalence of two subwords. All these results improve upon the best previously known counterparts. The linear construction time of our data structure also allows to improve the algorithm for finding $\delta$-subrepetitions in a text (a more general version of maximal repetitions, also called runs). For any fixed $\delta$ we obtain the first linear-time algorithm, which matches the linear time complexity of the algorithm computing runs. Our data structure has already been used as a part of the efficient solutions for subword suffix rank & selection, as well as substring compression using Burrows-Wheeler transform composed with run-length encoding.
  • In the Manhattan Sequence Consensus problem (MSC problem) we are given $k$ integer sequences, each of length $l$, and we are to find an integer sequence $x$ of length $l$ (called a consensus sequence), such that the maximum Manhattan distance of $x$ from each of the input sequences is minimized. For binary sequences Manhattan distance coincides with Hamming distance, hence in this case the string consensus problem (also called string center problem or closest string problem) is a special case of MSC. Our main result is a practically efficient $O(l)$-time algorithm solving MSC for $k\le 5$ sequences. Practicality of our algorithms has been verified experimentally. It improves upon the quadratic algorithm by Amir et al.\ (SPIRE 2012) for string consensus problem for $k=5$ binary strings. Similarly as in Amir's algorithm we use a column-based framework. We replace the implied general integer linear programming by its easy special cases, due to combinatorial properties of the MSC for $k\le 5$. We also show that for a general parameter $k$ any instance can be reduced in linear time to a kernel of size $k!$, so the problem is fixed-parameter tractable. Nevertheless, for $k\ge 4$ this is still too large for any naive solution to be feasible in practice.
  • A factor $u$ of a word $w$ is a cover of $w$ if every position in $w$ lies within some occurrence of $u$ in $w$. A word $w$ covered by $u$ thus generalizes the idea of a repetition, that is, a word composed of exact concatenations of $u$. In this article we introduce a new notion of $\alpha$-partial cover, which can be viewed as a relaxed variant of cover, that is, a factor covering at least $\alpha$ positions in $w$. We develop a data structure of $O(n)$ size (where $n=|w|$) that can be constructed in $O(n\log n)$ time which we apply to compute all shortest $\alpha$-partial covers for a given $\alpha$. We also employ it for an $O(n\log n)$-time algorithm computing a shortest $\alpha$-partial cover for each $\alpha=1,2,\ldots,n$.
  • For a partial word $w$ the longest common compatible prefix of two positions $i,j$, denoted $lccp(i,j)$, is the largest $k$ such that $w[i,i+k-1]\uparrow w[j,j+k-1]$, where $\uparrow$ is the compatibility relation of partial words (it is not an equivalence relation). The LCCP problem is to preprocess a partial word in such a way that any query $lccp(i,j)$ about this word can be answered in $O(1)$ time. It is a natural generalization of the longest common prefix (LCP) problem for regular words, for which an $O(n)$ preprocessing time and $O(1)$ query time solution exists. Recently an efficient algorithm for this problem has been given by F. Blanchet-Sadri and J. Lazarow (LATA 2013). The preprocessing time was $O(nh+n)$, where $h$ is the number of "holes" in $w$. The algorithm was designed for partial words over a constant alphabet and was quite involved. We present a simple solution to this problem with slightly better runtime that works for any linearly-sortable alphabet. Our preprocessing is in time $O(n\mu+n)$, where $\mu$ is the number of blocks of holes in $w$. Our algorithm uses ideas from alignment algorithms and dynamic programming.
  • Recently Kubica et al. (Inf. Process. Let., 2013) and Kim et al. (submitted to Theor. Comp. Sci.) introduced order-preserving pattern matching. In this problem we are looking for consecutive substrings of the text that have the same "shape" as a given pattern. These results include a linear-time order-preserving pattern matching algorithm for polynomially-bounded alphabet and an extension of this result to pattern matching with multiple patterns. We make one step forward in the analysis and give an $O(\frac{n\log{n}}{\log\log{n}})$ time randomized algorithm constructing suffix trees in the order-preserving setting. We show a number of applications of order-preserving suffix trees to identify patterns and repetitions in time series.
  • We derive a simple efficient algorithm for Abelian periods knowing all Abelian squares in a string. An efficient algorithm for the latter problem was given by Cummings and Smyth in 1997. By the way we show an alternative algorithm for Abelian squares. We also obtain a linear time algorithm finding all `long' Abelian periods. The aim of the paper is a (new) reduction of the problem of all Abelian periods to that of (already solved) all Abelian squares which provides new insight into both connected problems.
  • The notion of the cover is a generalization of a period of a string, and there are linear time algorithms for finding the shortest cover. The seed is a more complicated generalization of periodicity, it is a cover of a superstring of a given string, and the shortest seed problem is of much higher algorithmic difficulty. The problem is not well understood, no linear time algorithm is known. In the paper we give linear time algorithms for some of its versions --- computing shortest left-seed array, longest left-seed array and checking for seeds of a given length. The algorithm for the last problem is used to compute the seed array of a string (i.e., the shortest seeds for all the prefixes of the string) in $O(n^2)$ time. We describe also a simpler alternative algorithm computing efficiently the shortest seeds. As a by-product we obtain an $O(n\log{(n/m)})$ time algorithm checking if the shortest seed has length at least $m$ and finding the corresponding seed. We also correct some important details missing in the previously known shortest-seed algorithm (Iliopoulos et al., 1996).
  • A run is an inclusion maximal occurrence in a string (as a subinterval) of a repetition $v$ with a period $p$ such that $2p \le |v|$. The exponent of a run is defined as $|v|/p$ and is $\ge 2$. We show new bounds on the maximal sum of exponents of runs in a string of length $n$. Our upper bound of $4.1n$ is better than the best previously known proven bound of $5.6n$ by Crochemore & Ilie (2008). The lower bound of $2.035n$, obtained using a family of binary words, contradicts the conjecture of Kolpakov & Kucherov (1999) that the maximal sum of exponents of runs in a string of length $n$ is smaller than $2n$
  • We investigate the problem of the maximum number of cubic subwords (of the form $www$) in a given word. We also consider square subwords (of the form $ww$). The problem of the maximum number of squares in a word is not well understood. Several new results related to this problem are produced in the paper. We consider two simple problems related to the maximum number of subwords which are squares or which are highly repetitive; then we provide a nontrivial estimation for the number of cubes. We show that the maximum number of squares $xx$ such that $x$ is not a primitive word (nonprimitive squares) in a word of length $n$ is exactly $\lfloor \frac{n}{2}\rfloor - 1$, and the maximum number of subwords of the form $x^k$, for $k\ge 3$, is exactly $n-2$. In particular, the maximum number of cubes in a word is not greater than $n-2$ either. Using very technical properties of occurrences of cubes, we improve this bound significantly. We show that the maximum number of cubes in a word of length $n$ is between $(1/2)n$ and $(4/5)n$. (In particular, we improve the lower bound from the conference version of the paper.)
  • A run is a maximal occurrence of a repetition $v$ with a period $p$ such that $2p \le |v|$. The maximal number of runs in a string of length $n$ was studied by several authors and it is known to be between $0.944 n$ and $1.029 n$. We investigate highly periodic runs, in which the shortest period $p$ satisfies $3p \le |v|$. We show the upper bound $0.5n$ on the maximal number of such runs in a string of length $n$ and construct a sequence of words for which we obtain the lower bound $0.406 n$.