• Time-delay cosmography provides a unique way to directly measure the Hubble constant ($H_{0}$). The precision of the $H_{0}$ measurement depends on the uncertainties in the time-delay measurements, the mass distribution of the main deflector(s), and the mass distribution along the line of sight. Tie and Kochanek (2018) have proposed a new microlensing effect on time delays based on differential magnification of the accretion disc of the lensed quasar. If real, this effect could significantly broaden the uncertainty on the time delay measurements by up to $30\%$ for lens systems such as PG1115+080, which have relatively short time delays and monitoring over several different epochs. In this paper we develop a new technique that uses the time-delay ratios and simulated microlensing maps within a Bayesian framework in order to limit the allowed combinations of microlensing delays and thus to lessen the uncertainties due to the proposed effect. We show that, under the assumption of Tie and Kochanek (2018), the uncertainty on the time-delay distance ($D_{\Delta t}$, which is proportional to 1/$H_{0}$) of short time-delay ($\sim18$ days) lens, PG1115+080, increases from $\sim7\%$ to $\sim10\%$ by simultaneously fitting the three time-delay measurements from the three different datasets across twenty years, while in the case of long time-delay ($\sim90$ days) lens, the microlensing effect on time delays is negligible as the uncertainty on $D_{\Delta t}$ of RXJ1131-1231 only increases from $\sim2.5\%$ to $\sim2.6\%$.
  • We present the single-epoch black hole mass (M$_{\rm BH}$) calibrations based on the rest-frame UV and optical measurements of Mg II 2798\AA\ and H$\beta$ 4861\AA\ lines and AGN continuum, using a sample of 52 moderate-luminosity AGNs at z$\sim$0.4 and z$\sim$0.6 with high-quality Keck spectra. We combine this sample with a large number of luminous AGNs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to increase the dynamic range for a better comparison of UV and optical velocity and luminosity measurements. With respect to the reference M$_{\rm BH}$ based on the line dispersion of H$\beta$ and continuum luminosity at 5100\AA, we calibrate the UV and optical mass estimators, by determining the best-fit values of the coefficients in the mass equation. By investigating whether the UV estimators show systematic trend with Eddington ratio, FWHM of H$\beta$, the Fe II strength, and the UV/optical slope, we find no significant bias except for the slope. By fitting the systematic difference of Mg II-based and H$\beta$-based masses with the L$_{3000}$/L$_{5100}$ ratio, we provide a correction term as a function of the spectral index as $\Delta$C = 0.24 (1+$\alpha_{\lambda}$) + 0.17, which can be added to the Mg II-based mass estimators if the spectral slope can be well determined. The derived UV mass estimators typically show $>$$\sim$0.2 dex intrinsic scatter with respect to H$\beta$-based M$_{\rm BH}$, suggesting that the UV-based mass has an additional uncertainty of $\sim$0.2 dex, even if high quality rest-frame UV spectra are available.
  • Strongly gravitational lensed quasars can be used to measure the so-called time-delay distance $D_{\Delta t}$, and thus the Hubble constant $H_0$ and other cosmological parameters. Stellar kinematics of the deflector galaxy play an essential role in this measurement by: (i) helping break the mass-sheet degeneracy; (ii) determining in principle the angular diameter distance $D_{\rm d}$ to the deflector and thus further improving the cosmological constraints. In this paper we simulate observations of lensed quasars with integral field spectrographs and show that spatially resolved kinematics of the deflector enable further progress by helping break the mass-anisotropy degeneracy. Furthermore, we use our simulations to obtain realistic error estimates with current/upcoming instruments like OSIRIS on Keck and NIRSPEC on the James Webb Space Telescope for both distances (typically $\sim6$ per cent on $D_{\Delta t}$ and $\sim10$ per cent on $D_{\rm d}$). We use the error estimates to compute cosmological forecasts for the sample of nine lenses that currently have well measured time delays and deep Hubble Space Telescope images and for a sample of 40 lenses that is projected to be available in a few years through follow-up of candidates found in ongoing wide field surveys. We find that $H_0$ can be measured with 2 per cent (1 per cent) precision from nine (40) lenses in a flat $\Lambda$cold dark matter cosmology. We study several other cosmological models beyond the flat $\Lambda$cold dark matter model and find that time-delay lenses with spatially resolved kinematics can greatly improve the precision of the cosmological parameters measured by cosmic microwave background data.
  • Recent detections of Lyman alpha (Ly$\alpha$) emission from $z>7.5$ galaxies were somewhat unexpected given a dearth of previous non-detections in this era when the intergalactic medium (IGM) is still highly neutral. But these detections were from UV bright galaxies, which preferentially live in overdensities which reionize early, and have significantly Doppler-shifted Ly$\alpha$ line profiles emerging from their interstellar media (ISM), making them less affected by the global IGM state. Using a combination of reionization simulations and empirical ISM models we show, as a result of these two effects, UV bright galaxies in overdensities have $>2\times$ higher transmission through the $z\sim7$ IGM than typical field galaxies, and this boosted transmission is enhanced as the neutral fraction increases. The boosted transmission is not sufficient to explain the observed high Ly$\alpha$ fraction of $M_\mathrm{UV} \lesssim -22$ galaxies (Stark et al. 2017), suggesting Ly$\alpha$ emitted by these galaxies must be stronger than expected due to enhanced production and/or selection effects. Despite the bias of UV bright galaxies to reside in overdensities we show Ly$\alpha$ observations of such galaxies can accurately measure the global neutral hydrogen fraction, particularly when Ly$\alpha$ from UV faint galaxies is extinguished, making them ideal candidates for spectroscopic follow-up into the cosmic Dark Ages.
  • Galaxy-cluster gravitational lenses can magnify background galaxies by a total factor of up to ~50. Here we report an image of an individual star at redshift z=1.49 (dubbed "MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (LS1)") magnified by >2000. A separate image, detected briefly 0.26 arcseconds from LS1, is likely a counterimage of the first star demagnified for multiple years by a >~3 solar-mass object in the cluster. For reasonable assumptions about the lensing system, microlensing fluctuations in the stars' light curves can yield evidence about the mass function of intracluster stars and compact objects, including binary fractions and specific stellar evolution and supernova models. Dark-matter subhalos or massive compact objects may help to account for the two images' long-term brightness ratio.
  • We present the stellar mass-stellar metallicity relationship (MZR) in the Cl0024+1654 galaxy cluster at z~0.4 using full spectrum stellar population synthesis modeling of individual quiescent galaxies. The lower limit of our stellar mass range is $M_*=10^{9.7}M_\odot$, the lowest galaxy mass at which individual stellar metallicity has been measured beyond the local universe. We report a detection of an evolution of the stellar MZR with observed redshift at $0.037\pm0.007$ dex per Gyr, consistent with the predictions from hydrodynamical simulations. Additionally, we find that the evolution of the stellar MZR with observed redshift can be explained by an evolution of the stellar MZR with their formation time, i.e., when the single stellar population (SSP)-equivalent ages of galaxies are taken into account. This behavior is consistent with stars forming out of gas that also has an MZR with a normalization that decreases with redshift. Lastly, we find that over the observed mass range, the MZR can be described by a linear function with a shallow slope, ($[Fe/H] \propto (0.16 \pm 0.03) \log M_*$). The slope suggests that galaxy feedback, in terms of mass-loading factor, might be mass-independent over the observed mass and redshift range.
  • We present a new flexible Bayesian framework for directly inferring the fraction of neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, z~6-10) from detections and non-detections of Lyman Alpha (Ly$\alpha$) emission from Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). Our framework combines sophisticated reionization simulations with empirical models of the interstellar medium (ISM) radiative transfer effects on Ly$\alpha$. We assert that the Ly$\alpha$ line profile emerging from the ISM has an important impact on the resulting transmission of photons through the IGM, and that these line profiles depend on galaxy properties. We model this effect by considering the peak velocity offset of Ly$\alpha$ lines from host galaxies' systemic redshifts, which are empirically correlated with UV luminosity and redshift (or halo mass at fixed redshift). We use our framework on the sample of LBGs presented in Pentericci et al. (2014) and infer a global neutral fraction at z~7 of $\overline{x}_\mathrm{HI} = 0.59_{-0.15}^{+0.11}$, consistent with other robust probes of the EoR and confirming reionization is on-going ~700 Myr after the Big Bang. We show that using the full distribution of Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width detections and upper limits from LBGs places tighter constraints on the evolving IGM than the standard Ly$\alpha$ emitter fraction, and that larger samples are within reach of deep spectroscopic surveys of gravitationally lensed fields and JWST NIRSpec.
  • We present deep spectroscopic observations of a Lyman-break galaxy candidate (hereafter MACS1149-JD) at $z\sim9.5$ with the $\textit{Hubble}$ Space Telescope ($\textit{HST}$) WFC3/IR grisms. The grism observations were taken at 4 distinct position angles, totaling 34 orbits with the G141 grism, although only 19 of the orbits are relatively uncontaminated along the trace of MACS1149-JD. We fit a 3-parameter ($z$, F160W mag, and Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width) Lyman-break galaxy template to the three least contaminated grism position angles using an MCMC approach. The grism data alone are best fit with a redshift of $z_{\mathrm{grism}}=9.53^{+0.39}_{-0.60}$ ($68\%$ confidence), in good agreement with our photometric estimate of $z_{\mathrm{phot}}=9.51^{+0.06}_{-0.12}$ ($68\%$ confidence). Our analysis rules out Lyman-alpha emission from MACS1149-JD above a $3\sigma$ equivalent width of 21 \AA{}, consistent with a highly neutral IGM. We explore a scenario where the red $\textit{Spitzer}$/IRAC $[3.6] - [4.5]$ color of the galaxy previously pointed out in the literature is due to strong rest-frame optical emission lines from a very young stellar population rather than a 4000 \AA{} break. We find that while this can provide an explanation for the observed IRAC color, it requires a lower redshift ($z\lesssim9.1$), which is less preferred by the $\textit{HST}$ imaging data. The grism data are consistent with both scenarios, indicating that the red IRAC color can still be explained by a 4000 \AA{} break, characteristic of a relatively evolved stellar population. In this interpretation, the photometry indicate that a $340^{+29}_{-35}$ Myr stellar population is already present in this galaxy only $\sim500~\mathrm{Myr}$ after the Big Bang.
  • We present the full sample of 118 galaxy-scale strong-lens candidates in the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey for the Masses (S4TM) Survey, which are spectroscopically selected from the final data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Follow-up Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging observations confirm that 40 candidates are definite strong lenses with multiple lensed images. The foreground lens galaxies are found to be early-type galaxies (ETGs) at redshifts 0.06 to 0.44, and background sources are emission-line galaxies at redshifts 0.22 to 1.29. As an extension of the SLACS Survey, the S4TM Survey is the first attempt to preferentially search for strong-lens systems with relatively lower lens masses than those in the pre-existing strong-lens samples. By fitting HST data with a singular isothermal ellipsoid model, we find total projected mass within the Einstein radius of the S4TM strong-lens sample ranges from $3 \times10^{10} M_{\odot}$ to $2 \times10^{11} M_{\odot}$. In [Shu15], we have derived the total stellar mass of the S4TM lenses to be $5 \times10^{10} M_{\odot}$ to $1 \times10^{12} M_{\odot}$. Both total enclosed mass and stellar mass of the S4TM lenses are on average almost a factor of 2 smaller than those of the SLACS lenses, which also represent typical mass scales of the current strong-lens samples. The extended mass coverage provided by the S4TM sample can enable a direct test, with the aid of strong lensing, for transitions in scaling relations, kinematic properties, mass structure, and dark-matter content trends of ETGs at intermediate-mass scales as noted in previous studies.
  • Strong gravitational lenses with measured time delay are a powerful tool to measure cosmological parameters, especially the Hubble constant ($H_0$). Recent studies show that by combining just three multiply-imaged AGN systems, one can determine $H_0$ to 3.8% precision. Furthermore, the number of time-delay lens systems is growing rapidly, enabling, in principle, the determination of $H_0$ to 1% precision in the near future. However, as the precision increases it is important to ensure that systematic errors and biases remain subdominant. For this purpose, challenges with simulated datasets are a key component in this process. Following the experience of the past challenge on time delay, where it was shown that time delays can indeed be measured precisely and accurately at the sub-percent level, we now present the "Time Delay Lens Modeling Challenge" (TDLMC). The goal of this challenge is to assess the present capabilities of lens modeling codes and assumptions and test the level of accuracy of inferred cosmological parameters given realistic mock datasets. We invite scientists to model a set of simulated Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of 50 mock lens systems. The systems are organized in rungs, with the complexity and realism increasing going up the ladder. The goal of the challenge is to infer $H_0$ for each rung, given the HST images, the time delay, and a stellar velocity dispersion of the deflector, for a fixed background cosmology. The TDLMC challenge will start with the mock data release on 2018 January 8th, with a deadline for blind submission of 2018 August 8th. This first paper gives an overview of the challenge including the data design, and a set of metrics to quantify the modeling performance and challenge details. After the deadline, the results of the challenge will be presented in a companion paper with all challenge participants as co-authors.
  • Strongly lensed active galactic nuclei (AGN) provide a unique opportunity to make progress in the study of the evolution of the correlation between the mass of supermassive black holes ($\mathcal M_{BH}$) and their host galaxy luminosity ($L_{host}$). We demonstrate the power of lensing by analyzing two systems for which state-of-the-art lens modelling techniques have been applied to Hubble Space Telescope imaging data. We use i) the reconstructed images to infer the total and bulge luminosity of the host and ii) published broad-line spectroscopy to estimate $\mathcal M_{BH}$ using the so-called virial method. We then enlarge our sample with new calibration of previously published measurements to study the evolution of the correlation out to z~4.5. Consistent with previous work, we find that without taking into account passive luminosity evolution, the data points lie on the local relation. Once passive luminosity evolution is taken into account, we find that BHs in the more distant Universe reside in less luminous galaxies than today. Fitting this offset as $\mathcal M_{BH}$/$L_{host}$ $\propto$ (1+z)$^{\gamma}$, and taking into account selection effects, we obtain $\gamma$ = 0.6 $\pm$ 0.1 and 0.8$\pm$ 0.1 for the case of $\mathcal M_{BH}$-$L_{bulge}$ and $\mathcal M_{BH}$-$L_{total}$, respectively. To test for systematic uncertainties and selection effects we also consider a reduced sample that is homogeneous in data quality. We find consistent results but with considerably larger uncertainty due to the more limited sample size and redshift coverage ($\gamma$ = 0.7 $\pm$ 0.4 and 0.2$\pm$ 0.5 for $\mathcal M_{BH}$-$L_{bulge}$ and $\mathcal M_{BH}$-$L_{total}$, respectively), highlighting the need to gather more high-quality data for high-redshift lensed quasar hosts. Our result is consistent with a scenario where the growth of the black hole predates that of the host galaxy.
  • We present the discovery of 3 quasar lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), selected using two novel photometry-based selection techniques. The J0941+0518 system, with two point sources separated by 5.46" on either side of a galaxy, has source and lens redshifts $z_s = 1.54$ and $z_l = 0.343$. The AO-assisted images of J2211+1929 show two point sources separated by 1.04", corresponding to the same quasar at $z_s = 1.07,$ besides the lens galaxy and Einstein ring. Images of J2257+2349 show two point sources separated by 1.67" on either side of an E/S0 galaxy. The extracted spectra show two images of the same quasar at redshift $z_s = 2.10$. In total, the two selection techniques identified 309 lens candidates, including 47 known lenses, and 6 previously ruled out candidates. 55 of the remaining candidates were observed using NIRC2 and ESI at Keck Observatory, EFOSC2 at the ESO-NTT (La Silla), and SAM and the Goodman spectrograph at SOAR. Of the candidates observed, 3 were confirmed as lenses, 36 were ruled out, and 16 remain inconclusive. Taking into account that we recovered known lenses, this gives us a success rate of at least 50/309 (16%). This initial campaign demonstrates the power of purely photometric selection techniques in finding lensed quasars. Developing and refining these techniques is essential for efficient identification of these rare lenses in ongoing and future photometric surveys.
  • Within one billion years of the Big Bang, intergalactic hydrogen was ionized by sources emitting ultraviolet and higher energy photons. This was the final phenomenon to globally affect all the baryons (visible matter) in the Universe. It is referred to as cosmic reionization and is an integral component of cosmology. It is broadly expected that intrinsically faint galaxies were the primary ionizing sources due to their abundance in this epoch. However, at the highest redshifts ($z>7.5$; lookback time 13.1 Gyr), all galaxies with spectroscopic confirmations to date are intrinsically bright and, therefore, not necessarily representative of the general population. Here, we report the unequivocal spectroscopic detection of a low luminosity galaxy at $z>7.5$. We detected the Lyman-$\alpha$ emission line at $\sim 10504$ {\AA} in two separate observations with MOSFIRE on the Keck I Telescope and independently with the Hubble Space Telescope's slit-less grism spectrograph, implying a source redshift of $z = 7.640 \pm 0.001$. The galaxy is gravitationally magnified by the massive galaxy cluster MACS J1423.8+2404 ($z = 0.545$), with an estimated intrinsic luminosity of $M_{AB} = -19.6 \pm 0.2$ mag and a stellar mass of $M_{\star} = 3.0^{+1.5}_{-0.8} \times 10^8$ solar masses. Both are an order of magnitude lower than the four other Lyman-$\alpha$ emitters currently known at $z > 7.5$, making it probably the most distant representative source of reionization found to date.
  • We provide an updated calibration of CIV $\lambda1549$ broad emission line-based single-epoch (SE) black hole (BH) mass estimators for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using new data for six reverberation-mapped AGNs at redshift $z=0.005-0.028$ with BH masses (bolometric luminosities) in the range $10^{6.5}-10^{7.5}$ $M_{\odot}$ ($10^{41.7}-10^{43.8}$ erg s$^{\rm -1}$). New rest-frame UV-to-optical spectra covering 1150-5700 \AA\ for the six AGNs were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Multi-component spectral decompositions of the HST spectra were used to measure SE emission-line widths for the CIV, MgII, and H$\beta$ lines as well as continuum luminosities in the spectral region around each line. We combine the new data with similar measurements for a previous archival sample of 25 AGNs to derive the most consistent and accurate calibrations of the CIV-based SE BH mass estimators against the H$\beta$ reverberation-based masses, using three different measures of broad-line width: full-width at half maximum (FWHM), line dispersion ($\sigma_{\rm line}$) and mean absolute deviation (MAD). The newly expanded sample at redshift $z=0.005-0.234$ covers a dynamic range in BH mass (bolometric luminosity) of $\log\ M_{\rm BH}/M_{\odot} = 6.5-9.1$ ($\log\ L_{\rm bol}/$erg s$^{\rm -1}=41.7-46.9$), and we derive the new CIV-based mass estimators using a Bayesian linear regression analysis over this range. We generally recommend the use of $\sigma_{\rm line}$ or MAD rather than FWHM to obtain a less biased velocity measurement of the CIV emission line, because its narrow-line component contribution is difficult to decompose from the broad-line profile.
  • The CIII] and CIV rest-frame UV emission lines are powerful probes of the ionizations states of galaxies. They have furthermore been suggested as alternatives for spectroscopic redshift confirmation of objects at the epoch of reionization ($z>6$), where the most frequently used redshift indicator, Ly$\alpha$, is attenuated by the high fraction of neutral hydrogen in the inter-galactic medium. However, currently only very few confirmations of carbon UV lines at these high redshifts exist, making it challenging to quantify these claims. Here, we present the detection of CIV$\lambda\lambda$1548,1551\AA\ in \HST\ slitless grism spectroscopy obtained by GLASS of a Ly$\alpha$ emitter at $z=6.11$ multiply imaged by the massive foreground galaxy cluster RXJ2248. The CIV emission is detected at the 3--5$\sigma$ level in two images of the source, with marginal detection in two other images. We do not detect significant CIII]$\lambda\lambda$1907,1909\AA\ emission implying an equivalent width EW$_\textrm{CIII]}<20$\AA\ (1$\sigma$) and $\textrm{CIV/CIII}>0.7$ (2$\sigma$). Combined with limits on the rest-frame UV flux from the HeII$\lambda$1640\AA\ emission line and the OIII]$\lambda\lambda$1661,1666\AA\ doublet, we put constraints on the metallicity and the ionization state of the galaxy. The estimated line ratios and equivalent widths do not support a scenario where an AGN is responsible for ionizing the carbon atoms. SED fits including nebular emission lines imply a source with a mass of log(M/M$_\odot)\sim9$, SFR of around 10M$_\odot$/yr, and a young stellar population $<50$Myr old. The source shows a stronger ionizing radiation field than objects with detected CIV emission at $z<2$ and adds to the growing sample of low-mass (log(M/M$_\odot)\lesssim9$) galaxies at the epoch of reionization with strong radiation fields from star formation.
  • We present the first results of the KMOS Lens-Amplified Spectroscopic Survey (KLASS), a new ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) large program, doing multi-object integral field spectroscopy of galaxies gravitationally lensed behind seven galaxy clusters selected from the HST Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). Using the power of the cluster magnification we are able to reveal the kinematic structure of 25 galaxies at $0.7 \lesssim z \lesssim 2.3$, in four cluster fields, with stellar masses $8 \lesssim \log{(M_\star/M_\odot)} \lesssim 11$. This sample includes 5 sources at $z>1$ with lower stellar masses than in any previous kinematic IFU surveys. Our sample displays a diversity in kinematic structure over this mass and redshift range. The majority of our kinematically resolved sample is rotationally supported, but with a lower ratio of rotational velocity to velocity dispersion than in the local universe, indicating the fraction of dynamically hot disks changes with cosmic time. We find no galaxies with stellar mass $<3 \times 10^9 M_\odot$ in our sample display regular ordered rotation. Using the enhanced spatial resolution from lensing, we resolve a lower number of dispersion dominated systems compared to field surveys, competitive with findings from surveys using adaptive optics. We find that the KMOS IFUs recover emission line flux from HST grism-selected objects more faithfully than slit spectrographs. With artificial slits we estimate slit spectrographs miss on average 60% of the total flux of emission lines, which decreases rapidly if the emission line is spatially offset from the continuum.
  • We report the discovery of the quadruply lensed quasar J1433+6007, mined in the SDSS DR12 photometric catalogues using a novel outlier-selection technique, without prior spectroscopic or UV excess information. Discovery data obtained at the Nordic Optical telescope (NOT, La Palma) show nearly identical quasar spectra at $z_s=2.74$ and four quasar images in a fold configuration, one of which sits on a blue arc. The deflector redshift is $z_{l}=0.407,$ from Keck-ESI spectra. We describe the selection procedure, discovery and follow-up, image positions and $BVRi$ magnitudes, and first results and forecasts from simple lens models.
  • We present the results of ALMA spectroscopic follow-up of a $z=6.765$ Lyman-$\alpha$ emitting galaxy behind the cluster RXJ1347-1145. We report the detection of [CII]158$\mu$m line fully consistent with the Lyman-$\alpha$ redshift and with the peak of the optical emission. Given the magnification of $\mu=5.0 \pm 0.3$ the intrinsic (corrected for lensing) luminosity of the [CII] line is $L_{[CII]} =1.4^{+0.2}_{-0.3} \times 10^7L_{\odot}$, which is ${\sim}5$ times fainter than other detections of $z\sim 7$ galaxies. The result indicates that low $L_{[CII]}$ in $z\sim 7$ galaxies compared to the local counterparts might be caused by their low metallicities and/or feedback. The small velocity off-set ($\Delta v = 20_{-40}^{+140} \rm km/s$) between the Lyman-$\alpha$ and [CII] line is unusual, and may be indicative of ionizing photons escaping.
  • We present an exploration of the mass structure of a sample of 12 strongly lensed massive, compact early-type galaxies at redshifts $z\sim0.6$ to provide further possible evidence for their inside-out growth. We obtain new ESI/Keck spectroscopy and infer the kinematics of both lens and source galaxies, and combine these with existing photometry to construct (a) the fundamental plane (FP) of the source galaxies and (b) physical models for their dark and luminous mass structure. We find their FP to be tilted towards the virial plane relative to the local FP, and attribute this to their unusual compactness, which causes their kinematics to be totally dominated by the stellar mass as opposed to their dark matter; that their FP is nevertheless still inconsistent with the virial plane implies that both the stellar and dark structure of early-type galaxies is non-homologous. We also find the intrinsic scatter of their FP to be comparable to the local value, indicating that variations in the stellar mass structure outweight variations in the dark halo in the central regions of early-type galaxies. Finally, we show that inference on the dark halo structure -- and, in turn, the underlying physics -- is sensitive to assumptions about the stellar initial mass function (IMF), but that physically-motivated assumptions about the IMF imply haloes with sub-NFW inner density slopes, and may present further evidence for the inside-out growth of compact early-type galaxies via minor mergers and accretion.
  • Strong gravitational lenses with measured time delays between the multiple images allow a direct measurement of the time-delay distance to the lens, and thus a measure of cosmological parameters, particularly the Hubble constant, $H_{0}$. We present a blind lens model analysis of the quadruply-imaged quasar lens HE 0435-1223 using deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging, updated time-delay measurements from the COSmological MOnitoring of GRAvItational Lenses (COSMOGRAIL), a measurement of the velocity dispersion of the lens galaxy based on Keck data, and a characterization of the mass distribution along the line of sight. HE 0435-1223 is the third lens analyzed as a part of the $H_{0}$ Lenses in COSMOGRAIL's Wellspring (H0LiCOW) project. We account for various sources of systematic uncertainty, including the detailed treatment of nearby perturbers, the parameterization of the galaxy light and mass profile, and the regions used for lens modeling. We constrain the effective time-delay distance to be $D_{\Delta t} = 2612_{-191}^{+208}~\mathrm{Mpc}$, a precision of 7.6%. From HE 0435-1223 alone, we infer a Hubble constant of $H_{0} = 73.1_{-6.0}^{+5.7}~\mathrm{km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}}$ assuming a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. The cosmographic inference based on the three lenses analyzed by H0LiCOW to date is presented in a companion paper (H0LiCOW Paper V).
  • Wide-field photometric surveys enable searches of rare yet interesting objects, such as strongly lensed quasars or quasars with a bright host galaxy. Past searches for lensed quasars based on their optical and near infrared properties have relied on photometric cuts and spectroscopic pre-selection (as in the Sloan Quasar Lens Search), or neural networks applied to photometric samples. These methods rely on cuts in morphology and colours, with the risk of losing many interesting objects due to scatter in their population properties, restrictive training sets, systematic uncertainties in catalog-based magnitudes, and survey-to-survey photometric variations. Here, we explore the performance of a Gaussian Mixture Model to separate point-like quasars, quasars with an extended host, and strongly lensed quasars using griz psf and model magnitudes and WISE W1, W2. The choice of optical magnitudes is due to their presence in all current and upcoming releases of wide-field surveys, whereas UV information is not always available. We then assess the contamination from blue galaxies and the role of additional features such as W3 magnitudes or psf-model terms as morphological information. As a demonstration, we conduct a search in a random 10% of the SDSS footprint, and we provide the catalog of the 43 SDSS object with the highest `lens' score in our selection that survive visual inspection, and are spectroscopically confirmed to host active nuclei. We inspect archival data and find images of 5/43 objects in the Hubble Legacy Archive, including 2 known lenses. The code and materials are available to facilitate follow-up.
  • The Type~Ia supernova (SN~Ia) 2016coj in NGC 4125 (redshift $z=0.004523$) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search 4.9 days after the fitted first-light time (FFLT; 11.1 days before $B$-band maximum). Our first detection (pre-discovery) is merely $0.6\pm0.5$ day after the FFLT, making SN 2016coj one of the earliest known detections of a SN Ia. A spectrum was taken only 3.7 hr after discovery (5.0 days after the FFLT) and classified as a normal SN Ia. We performed high-quality photometry, low- and high-resolution spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry, finding that SN 2016coj is a spectroscopically normal SN Ia, but with a high velocity of \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 ($\sim 12,600$\,\kms\ around peak brightness). The \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 velocity evolution can be well fit by a broken-power-law function for up to a month after the FFLT. SN 2016coj has a normal peak luminosity ($M_B \approx -18.9 \pm 0.2$ mag), and it reaches a $B$-band maximum \about16.0~d after the FFLT. We estimate there to be low host-galaxy extinction based on the absence of Na~I~D absorption lines in our low- and high-resolution spectra. The spectropolarimetric data exhibit weak polarization in the continuum, but the \ion{Si}{2} line polarization is quite strong ($\sim 0.9\% \pm 0.1\%$) at peak brightness.
  • We present a new sample of strong gravitational lens systems where both the foreground lenses and background sources are early-type galaxies. Using imaging from HST/ACS and Keck/NIRC2, we model the surface brightness distributions and show that the sources form a distinct population of massive, compact galaxies at redshifts $0.4 \lesssim z \lesssim 0.7$, lying systematically below the size-mass relation of the global elliptical galaxy population at those redshifts. These may therefore represent relics of high-redshift red nuggets or their partly-evolved descendants. We exploit the magnifying effect of lensing to investigate the structural properties, stellar masses and stellar populations of these objects with a view to understanding their evolution. We model these objects parametrically and find that they generally require two S\'ersic components to properly describe their light profiles, with one more spheroidal component alongside a more envelope-like component, which is slightly more extended though still compact. This is consistent with the hypothesis of the inside-out growth of these objects via minor mergers. We also find that the sources can be characterised by red-to-blue colour gradients as a function of radius which are stronger at low redshift -- indicative of ongoing accretion -- but that their environments generally appear consistent with that of the general elliptical galaxy population, contrary to recent suggestions that these objects are predominantly associated with clusters.
  • The empirical correlation between the mass of a super-massive black hole (MBH) and its host galaxy properties is widely considered to be evidence of their co-evolution. A powerful way to test the co-evolution scenario and learn about the feedback processes linking galaxies and nuclear activity is to measure these correlations as a function of redshift. Unfortunately, currently MBH can only be estimated in active galaxies at cosmological distances. At these distances, bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) can outshine the host galaxy, making it extremely difficult to measure the host's luminosity. Strongly lensed AGNs provide in principle a great opportunity to improve the sensitivity and accuracy of the host galaxy luminosity measurements as the host galaxy is magnified and more easily separated from the point source, provided the lens model is sufficiently accurate. In order to measure the MBH-L correlation with strong lensing, it is necessary to ensure that the lens modelling is accurate, and that the host galaxy luminosity can be recovered to at least a precision and accuracy better than that of the typical MBH measurement. We carry out extensive and realistic simulations of deep Hubble Space Telescope observations of lensed AGNs obtained by our collaboration. We show that the host galaxy luminosity can be recovered with better accuracy and precision than the typical uncertainty on MBH(~ 0.5 dex) for hosts as faint as 2-4 magnitudes dimmer than the AGN itself. Our simulations will be used to estimate bias and uncertainties on the actual measurements to be presented in a future paper.
  • The arrival times, positions, and fluxes of multiple images in strong lens systems can be used to infer the presence of dark subhalos in the deflector, and thus test predictions of cold dark matter models. However, gravitational lensing does not distinguish between perturbations to a smooth gravitational potential arising from baryonic and non-baryonic mass. In this work, we quantify the extent to which the stellar mass distribution of a deflector can reproduce flux ratio and astrometric anomalies typically associated with the presence of a dark matter subhalo. Using Hubble Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies, we simulate strong lens systems with real distributions of stellar mass as they would be observed at redshift $z_d=0.5$. We add a dark matter halo and external shear to account for the smooth dark matter field, omitting dark substructure, and use a Monte Carlo procedure to characterize the distributions of image positions, time delays, and flux ratios for a compact background source of diameter 5 pc. By convolving high-resolution images of real galaxies with a Gaussian PSF, we simulate the most detailed smooth potential one could construct given high quality data, and find scatter in flux ratios of $\approx 10\%$, which we interpret as a typical deviation from a smooth potential caused by large and small scale structure in the lensing galaxy. We demonstrate that the flux ratio anomalies arising from galaxy-scale baryonic structure can be minimized by selecting the most massive and round deflectors, and by simultaneously modeling flux ratio and astrometric data.