• Angular momentum plays very important roles in the formation of PBHs in the matter-dominated phase if it lasts sufficiently long. In fact, most collapsing masses are bounced back due to centrifugal force, since angular momentum significantly grows before collapse. As a consequence, most of the formed PBHs are rapidly rotating near the extreme value $a_{*}=1$, where $a_{*}$ is the nondimensional Kerr parameter at their formation. The smaller the density fluctuation $\sigma_{H}$ at horizon entry is, the stronger the tendency towards the extreme rotation. Combining the effect of angular momentum with that of anisotropy, we estimate the black hole production rate. We find that the production rate suffers from suppression dominantly due to angular momentum for a smaller value of $\sigma_{H}$, while due to anisotrpopy for a larger value of $\sigma_{H}$. We argue that matter domination significantly enhances the production of PBHs despite the suppression. If the matter-dominated phase does not last so long, the effect of the finite duration significantly suppresses PBH formation and weakens the tendency towards large spins. (abridged)
  • The production rate of primordial black holes is often calculated by considering a nearly Gaussian distribution of cosmological perturbations, and assuming that black holes will form in regions where the amplitude of such perturbations exceeds a certain threshold. A threshold $\zeta_{\rm th}$ for the curvature perturbation is somewhat inappropriate for this purpose, because it depends significantly on environmental effects, not essential to the local dynamics. By contrast, a threshold $\delta_{\rm th}$ for the density perturbation at horizon crossing seems to provide a more robust criterion. On the other hand, the density perturbation is known to be bounded above by a maximum limit $\delta_{\rm max}$, and given that $\delta_{\rm th}$ is comparable to $\delta_{\rm max}$, the density perturbation will be far from Gaussian near or above the threshold. In this paper we provide a new plausible estimate for the primordial black hole abundance based on peak theory. In our approach, we assume a Gaussian distribution for the curvature perturbation, while an optimized criterion for PBH formation is imposed, based on the locally averaged density perturbation around the nearly spherically symmetric high peaks. Both variables are related by the full nonlinear expression derived in the long-wavelength approximation of general relativity. We find that the mass spectrum is shifted to larger mass scales by one order of magnitude or so, compared to a conventional calculation. The abundance of PBHs becomes significantly larger than the conventional one, by many orders of magnitude, mainly due to the optimized criterion for PBH formation.
  • A strong gravity naked singular region can give important clues towards understanding classical as well as spontaneous nature of General Relativity. We propose here a model for energy emission from a naked singular region in a self-similar dust spacetime by gluing two self-similar dust solutions at the Cauchy horizon. The energy is defined and evaluated as a surface energy of a null hypersurface, the null shell. Also included are scenarios of spontaneous creation or disappearance of a singularity, end of inflation, black hole formation and bubble nucleation. Our examples investigated here explicitly show that one can model unlimitedly luminous and energetic objects in the framework of General Relativity.
  • We completely classify Friedmann-Lema\^{i}tre-Robertson-Walker solutions with spatial curvature $K=0,\pm 1$ and equation of state $p=w\rho$, according to their conformal structure, singularities and trapping horizons. We do not assume any energy conditions and allow $\rho < 0$, thereby going beyond the usual well-known solutions. For each spatial curvature, there is an initial spacelike big-bang singularity for $w>-1/3$ and $\rho>0$, while no big-bang singularity for $w<-1$ and $\rho>0$. For $K=0$ or $-1$, $-1<w<-1/3$ and $\rho>0$, there is an initial null big-bang singularity. For each spatial curvature, there is a final spacelike future big-rip singularity for $w<-1$ and $\rho>0$, with null geodesics being future complete for $-5/3\le w<-1$ but incomplete for $w<-5/3$. For $w=-1/3$, the expansion speed is constant. For $-1<w<-1/3$ and $K=1$, the universe contracts from infinity, then bounces and expands back to infinity. For $K=0$, the past boundary consists of timelike infinity and a regular null hypersurface for $-5/3<w<-1$, while it consists of past timelike and past null infinities for $w\le -5/3$. For $w<-1$ and $K=1$, the spacetime contracts from an initial spacelike past big-rip singularity, then bounces and blows up at a final spacelike future big-rip singularity. For $w<-1$ and $K=-1$, the past boundary consists of a regular null hypersurface. The trapping horizons are timelike, null and spacelike for $w\in (-1,1/3)$, $w\in \{1/3, -1\}$ and $w\in (-\infty,-1)\cup (1/3,\infty)$, respectively. A negative energy density ($\rho <0$) is possible only for $K=-1$. In this case, for $w>-1/3$, the universe contracts from infinity, then bounces and expands to infinity; for $-1<w<-1/3$, it starts from a big-bang singularity and contracts to a big-crunch singularity; for $w<-1$, it expands from a regular null hypersurface and contracts to another regular null hypersurface.
  • We give the formulation and the general analysis of the rotational accretion problem on $D$-dimensional spherical spacetime and investigate sonic points and critical points. First, we construct the simple two-dimensional rotating accretion flow model in general $D$-dimensional static spherically symmetric spacetime and formulate the problem. The flow forms a two-dimensional disk lying on the equatorial plane and the disk is assumed to be geometrically thin and has uniform distribution in the polar angle directions. Analyzing the critical point of the problem, we give the conditions for the critical point and its classification explicitly and show the coincidence with the sonic point for generic equation of state (EOS). Next, adopting the EOS of ideal photon gas to the analysis, we reveal that there always exists a correspondence between the sonic points and the photon spheres of the spacetime. Our main result is that the sonic point of the rotating accretion flow of ideal photon gas must be on (one of) the unstable photon sphere(s) of the spacetime in arbitrary spacetime dimensions. This paper extends this correspondence for spherical flows shown in the authors' previous work to rotating accretion disks.
  • This paper proposes an image-processing-based method for personalization of calorie consumption assessment during exercising. An experiment is carried out where several actions are required in an exercise called broadcast gymnastics, especially popular in Japan and China. We use Kinect, which captures body actions by separating the body into joints and segments that contain them, to monitor body movements to test the velocity of each body joint and capture the subject's image for calculating the mass of each body joint that differs for each subject. By a kinetic energy formula, we obtain the kinetic energy of each body joint, and calories consumed during exercise are calculated in this process. We evaluate the performance of our method by benchmarking it to Fitbit, a smart watch well-known for health monitoring during exercise. The experimental results in this paper show that our method outperforms a state-of-the-art calorie assessment method, which we base on and improve, in terms of the error rate from Fitbit's ground-truth values.
  • The superspinar proposed by Gimon and Horava is a rapidly rotating compact entity whose exterior is described by the over-spinning Kerr geometry. The compact entity itself is expected to be governed by superstringy effects, and in astrophysical scenarios it can give rise to interesting observable phenomena. Earlier it was suggested that the superspinar may not be stable but we point out here that this does not necessarily follow from earlier studies. We show, by analytically treating the Teukolsky equations by Detwiler's method, that in fact there are infinitely many boundary conditions that make the superspinar stable, and that the modes will decay in time. It follows that we need to know more on the physical nature of the superspinar in order to decide on its stability in physical reality.
  • We consider a head-on collision of two massive particles that move in the equatorial plane of an extremal Kerr black hole, which results in the production of two massless particles. Focusing on a typical case, where both of the colliding particles have zero angular momenta, we show that a massless particle produced in such a collision can escape to infinity with arbitrarily large energy in the near-horizon limit of the collision point. Furthermore, if we assume that the emission of the produced massless particles is isotropic in the center-of-mass frame but confined to the equatorial plane, the escape probability of the produced massless particle approaches $5/12$ and almost all escaping massless particles have arbitrarily large energy at infinity and an impact parameter approaching $2GM/c^2$, where $M$ is the mass of the black hole.
  • This paper presents a design of a non-player character (AI) for promoting balancedness in use of body segments when engaging in full-body motion gaming. In our experiment, we settle a battle between the proposed AI and a player by using FightingICE, a fighting game platform for AI development. A middleware called UKI is used to allow the player to control the game by using body motion instead of the keyboard and mouse. During gameplay, the proposed AI analyze health states of the player; it determines its next action by predicting how each candidate action, recommended by a Monte-Carlo tree search algorithm, will induce the player to move, and how the player's health tends to be affected. Our result demonstrates successful improvement in balancedness in use of body segments on 4 out of 5 subjects.
  • We simulate the spindle gravitational collapse of a collisionless particle system in a 3D numerical relativity code and compare the qualitative results with the old work done by Shapiro and Teukolsky(ST). The simulation starts from the prolate-shaped distribution of particles and a spindle collapse is observed. The peak value and its spatial position of curvature invariants are monitored during the time evolution. We find that the peak value of the Kretschmann invariant takes a maximum at some moment, when there is no apparent horizon, and its value is greater for a finer resolution, which is consistent with what is reported in ST. We also find a similar tendency for the Weyl curvature invariant. Therefore, our results lend support to the formation of a naked singularity as a result of the axially symmetric spindle collapse of a collisionless particle system in the limit of infinite resolution. However, unlike in ST, our code does not break down then but go well beyond.We find that the peak values of the curvature invariants start to gradually decrease with time for a certain period of time. Another notable difference from ST is that, in our case, the peak position of the Kretschmann curvature invariant is always inside the matter distribution.
  • Gravitational lensing is a good probe into the topological structure of dark gravitating celestial objects. In this paper, we investigate the light curve of a light ray that passes through the throat of an Ellis wormhole, the simplest example of traversable wormholes. The method developed here is also applicable to other traversable wormholes. To study whether the light curve of a light ray that passes through a wormhole throat is distinguishable from that which does not, we also calculate light curves without the passage of a throat for an Ellis wormhole, a Schwarzschild black hole, and an ultrastatic wormhole with the spatial geometry identical to that of the Schwarzschild black hole in the following two cases: (i) "microlensing," where the source, lens, and observer are almost aligned in this order and the light ray starts at the source, refracts in the weak gravitational field of the lens with a small deflection angle, and reaches the observer, and (ii) "retrolensing," where the source, observer, and lens are almost aligned in this order, and the light ray starts at the source, refracts in the vicinity of the light sphere of the lens with a deflection angle very close to $\pi$, and reaches the observer. We find that the light curve of the light ray that passes through the throat of the Ellis wormhole is clearly distinguishable from that by the microlensing but not from that by the retrolensing. This is because the light curve of a light ray that passes by a light sphere of a lens with a large deflection angle has common characters, irrespective of the details of the lens object. This implies that the light curves of the light rays that pass through the throat of more general traversable wormholes are qualitatively the same as that of the Ellis wormhole.
  • We investigate primordial black hole formation in the matter-dominated phase of the Universe, where nonspherical effects in gravitational collapse play a crucial role. This is in contrast to the black hole formation in a radiation-dominated era. We apply the Zel'dovich approximation, Thorne's hoop conjecture, and Doroshkevich's probability distribution and subsequently derive the production probability $\beta_{0}$ of primordial black holes. The numerical result obtained is applicable even if the density fluctuation $\sigma$ at horizon entry is of the order of unity. For $\sigma\ll 1$, we find a semi-analytic formula $\beta_{0}\simeq 0.05556 \sigma^{5}$, which is comparable with the Khlopov-Polnarev formula. We find that the production probability in the matter-dominated era is much larger than that in the radiation-dominated era for $\sigma\lesssim 0.05$, while they are comparable with each other for $\sigma\gtrsim 0.05$. We also discuss how $\sigma$ can be written in terms of primordial curvature perturbations.
  • We construct spacetimes which provide spherical and nonspherical models of black hole formation in the flat Friedmann--Lemaitre--Robertson--Walker (FLRW) universe with the Lemaitre--Tolman--Bondi solution and the Szekeres quasispherical solution, respectively. These dust solutions may contain both shell-crossing and shell-focusing naked singularities. These singularities can be physically regarded as the breakdown of dust description, where strong pressure gradient force plays a role. We adopt the simultaneous big bang condition to extract a growing mode of adiabatic perturbation in the flat FLRW universe. If the density perturbation has a sufficiently homogeneous central region and a sufficiently sharp transition to the background FLRW universe, its central shell-focusing singularity is globally covered. If the density concentration is sufficiently large, no shell-crossing singularity appears and a black hole is formed. If the density concentration is not sufficiently large, a shell-crossing singularity appears. In this case, a large dipole moment significantly advances shell-crossing singularities and they tend to appear before the black hole formation. In contrast, a shell-crossing singularity unavoidably appears in the spherical and nonspherical evolution of cosmological voids. The present analysis is general and applicable to cosmological nonlinear structure formation described by these dust solutions.
  • We study the self-similar motion of a string in a self-similar spacetime by introducing the concept of a self-similar string, which is defined as the world sheet to which a homothetic vector field is tangent. It is shown that in Nambu-Goto theory, the equations of motion for a self-similar string reduce to those for a particle. Moreover, under certain conditions such as the hypersurface orthogonality of the homothetic vector field, the equations of motion for a self-similar string simplify to the geodesic equations on a (pseudo) Riemannian space. As a concrete example, we investigate a self-similar Nambu-Goto string in a spatially flat Friedmann-Lema\^itre-Robertson-Walker expanding universe with self-similarity and obtain solutions of open and closed strings, which have various nontrivial configurations depending on the rate of the cosmic expansion. For instance, we obtain a circular solution that evolves linearly in the cosmic time while keeping its configuration by the balance between the effects of the cosmic expansion and string tension. We also show the instability for linear radial perturbation of the circular solutions.
  • In an accretion of fluid, its velocity may transit from subsonic to supersonic. The point at which such transition occurs is called sonic point and often mathematically special. We consider a steady-state and spherically symmetric accretion problem of ideal photon gas in general static spherically symmetric spacetime neglecting back reaction. Our main result is that the EOS of ideal photon gas leads to correspondence between its sonic point and the photon sphere of the spacetime in general situations. Despite of the dependence of the EOS on the dimension of spacetime, this correspondence holds for spacetimes of arbitrary dimensions.
  • We propose a consistent analytic approach to the efficiency of collisional Penrose process in the vicinity of a maximally rotating Kerr black hole. We focus on a collision with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy, which occurs if either of the colliding particles has its angular momentum fine-tuned to the critical value to enter the horizon. We show that if the fine-tuned particle is ingoing on the collision, the upper limit of the efficiency is $(2+\sqrt{3})(2-\sqrt{2})\simeq 2.186$, while if the fine-tuned particle is bounced back before the collision, the upper limit is $(2+\sqrt{3})^{2}\simeq 13.93$. Despite earlier claims, the former can be attained for inverse Compton scattering if the fine-tuned particle is massive and starts at rest at infinity, while the latter can be attained for various particle reactions, such as inverse Compton scattering and pair annihilation, if the fine-tuned particle is either massless or highly relativistic at infinity. We discuss the difference between the present and earlier analyses.
  • Vacuum excitation by time-varying boundary conditions is not only of fundamental importance but also has recently been confirmed in a laboratory experiment. In this paper, we study the vacuum excitation of a scalar field by the instantaneous appearance and disappearance of a both-sided Dirichlet wall in the middle of a 1D cavity, as toy models of bifurcating and merging spacetimes, respectively. It is shown that the energy flux emitted positively diverges on the null lines emanating from the appearance and disappearance events, which is analogous to the result of Anderson and DeWitt. This result suggests that the semiclassical effect prevents the spacetime both from bifurcating and merging. In addition, we argue that the diverging flux in the disappearance case plays an interesting role to compensate for the lowness of ambient energy density after the disappearance, which is lower than the zero-point level.
  • The origin of the ultra-high-energy particles we receive on the Earth from the outer space such as EeV cosmic rays and PeV neutrinos remains an enigma. All mechanisms known to us currently make use of electromagnetic interaction to accelerate charged particles. In this paper we propose a mechanism exclusively based on gravity rather than electromagnetic interaction. We show that it is possible to generate ultra-high-energy particles starting from particles with moderate energies using the collisional Penrose process in an overspinning Kerr spacetime transcending the Kerr bound only by an infinitesimal amount, i.e., with the Kerr parameter $a=M(1+\epsilon)$, where we take the limit $\epsilon \rightarrow 0^+$. We consider two massive particles starting from rest at infinity that collide at $r=M$ with divergent center-of-mass energy and produce two massless particles. We show that massless particles produced in the collision can escape to infinity with the ultra-high energies exploiting the collisional Penrose process with the divergent efficiency $\eta \sim {1}/{\sqrt{\epsilon}} \rightarrow \infty$. Assuming the isotropic emission of massless particles in the center-of-mass frame of the colliding particles, we show that half of the particles created in the collisions escape to infinity with the divergent energies. To a distant observer, ultra-high-energy particles appear to originate from a bright spot which is at the angular location $\xi \sim {2M}/{r_{obs}}$ with respect to the singularity on the side which is rotating towards the observer. We show that the anisotropy in emission in the center-of-mass frame, which is dictated by the differential cross-section of underlying particle physics process, leaves a district signature on the spectrum of ultra-high-energy massless particles. Thus, it provides a unique probe into fundamental particle physics.
  • This paper presents a procedural generation method that creates visually attractive levels for the Angry Birds game. Besides being an immensely popular mobile game, Angry Birds has recently become a test bed for various artificial intelligence technologies. We propose a new approach for procedurally generating Angry Birds levels using Chinese style and Japanese style building structures. A conducted experiment confirms the effectiveness of our approach with statistical significance.
  • Primordial black holes (PBHs) are those which may have formed in the early Universe and affected the subsequent evolution of the Universe through their Hawking radiation and gravitational field. To constrain the early Universe from the observational constraint on the abundance of PBHs, it is essential to determine the formation threshold for primordial cosmological fluctuations, which are naturally described by cosmological long-wavelength solutions. I will briefly review our recent analytical and numerical results on the PBH formation.
  • The center-of-mass energy of two particles can become arbitrarily large if they collide near the event horizon of an extremal Kerr black hole, which is called the Ba$\rm \tilde n$ados-Silk-West (BSW) effect. We consider such a high-energy collision of two particles which started from infinity and follow geodesics in the equatorial plane and investigate the energy extraction from such a high-energy particle collision and the production of particles in the equatorial plane. We analytically show that, on the one hand, if the produced particles are as massive as the colliding particles, the energy-extraction efficiency is bounded by $2.19$ approximately. On the other hand, if a very massive particle is to be produced as a result of the high-energy collision, which has negative energy and necessarily falls into the black hole, the upper limit of the energy-extraction efficiency is increased to $(2+\sqrt{3})^2 \simeq 13.9$. Thus, higher efficiency of the energy extraction, which is typically as large as 10, provides strong evidence for the production of a heavy particle.
  • The effect of the Gauss-Bonnet term on the existence and dynamical stability of thin-shell wormholes as negative tension branes is studied in the arbitrary dimensional spherically, planar, and hyperbolically symmetric spacetimes. We consider radial perturbations against the shell for the solutions which have the Z${}_2$ symmetry and admit the general relativistic limit. It is shown that the Gauss-Bonnet term shrinks the parameter region admitting static wormholes. The effect of the Gauss-Bonnet term on the stability depends on the spacetime symmetry. For planar symmetric wormholes, the Gauss-Bonnet term does not affect their stability. If the coupling constant is positive but small, the Gauss-Bonnet term tends to destabilize spherically symmetric wormholes, while it stabilizes hypebolically symmetric wormholes. The Gauss-Bonnet term can destabilize hypebolically symmetric wormholes as a non-perturbative effect, however, spherically symmetric wormholes cannot be stable.
  • We make a critical comparison between ultra-high energy particle collisions around an extremal Kerr black hole and that around an over-spinning Kerr singularity, mainly focusing on the issue of the timescale of collisions. We show that the time required for two massive particles with the proton mass or two massless particles of GeV energies to collide around the Kerr black hole with Planck energy is several orders of magnitude longer than the age of the Universe for astro-physically relevant masses of black holes, whereas time required in the over-spinning case is of the order of ten million years which is much shorter than the age of the Universe. Thus from the point of view of observation of Planck scale collisions, the over-spinning Kerr geometry, subject to their occurrence, has distinct advantage over their black hole counterparts.
  • We construct cosmological long-wavelength solutions without symmetry in general gauge conditions compatible with the long-wavelength scheme. We then specify the relationship among the solutions in different time slicings. Applying this general framework to spherical symmetry, we derive the correspondence relation between long-wavelength solutions in the constant mean curvature slicing with conformally flat spatial coordinates and asymptotic quasihomogeneous solutions in the comoving gauge and compare the numerical results of PBH formation in these two different approaches. To discuss the PBH formation, it is convenient and conventional to use $\tilde{\delta}_{c}$, the value which the averaged density perturbation at threshold in the comoving slicing would take at horizon entry in the lowest-order long-wavelength expansion. We numerically find that within compensated models, the sharper the transition from the overdense region to the FRW universe is, the larger the $\tilde{\delta}_{c}$ becomes. We suggest that, for the equation of state $p=(\Gamma-1)\rho$, we can apply the analytic formulas for the minimum $\tilde{\delta}_{c, {\rm min}}\simeq [3\Gamma/(3\Gamma+2)]\sin^{2}\left[\pi\sqrt{\Gamma-1}/(3\Gamma-2)\right]$ and the maximum $\tilde{\delta}_{c, {\rm max}}\simeq 3\Gamma/(3\Gamma+2)$. As for the threshold peak value of the curvature variable $\psi_{0,c}$, we find that the sharper the transition is, the smaller the $\psi_{0,c}$ becomes. We analytically explain this feature. Using simplified models, we also analytically deduce an environmental effect that $\psi_{0,c}$ can be significantly larger (smaller) if the underlying density perturbation of much longer wavelength is positive (negative).
  • The angular momentum of the Kerr singularity should not be larger than a threshold value so that it is enclosed by an event horizon: The Kerr singularity with the angular momentum exceeding the threshold value is naked. This fact suggests that if the cosmic censorship exists in our Universe, an over-spinning body without releasing its angular momentum cannot collapse to spacetime singularities. A simple kinematical estimate of two particles approaching each other supports this expectation and suggests the existence of a minimum size of an over-spinning body. But this does not imply that the geometry near the naked singularity cannot appear. By analyzing initial data, i.e., a snapshot of a spinning body, we see that an over-spinning body may produce a geometry close to the Kerr naked singularity around itself at least as a transient configuration.