• We present a new magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code with the aim of providing accurate numerical solutions to astrophysical phenomena where discontinuities, shock waves, and turbulence are inherently important. The code implements the HLLD approximate Riemann solver, the fifth-order-monotonicity-preserving interpolation (MP5) scheme, and the hyperbolic divergence cleaning method for a magnetic field. This choice of schemes significantly improved numerical accuracy and stability, and saved computational costs in multidimensional problems. Numerical tests of one- and two-dimensional problems showed the advantages of using the high-order scheme by comparing with results from a standard second-order TVD MUSCL scheme. The present code enabled us to explore long-term evolution of a three-dimensional accretion disk around a black hole, in which compressible MHD turbulence caused continuous mass accretion via nonlinear growth of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI). Numerical tests with various computational cell sizes exhibited a convergent picture of the early nonlinear growth of the MRI in a global model, and indicated that the MP5 scheme has more than twice the resolution of the MUSCL scheme in practical applications.
  • We perform global three-dimensional (3D) radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of out- flow from supercritical accretion flow around a 10 Msun black hole. We only solve the outflow part, starting from the axisymmetric 2D simulation data in a nearly steady state but with small perturbations in a sinusoidal form being added in the azimuthal direction. The mass accretion rate onto the black hole is ~10^2 L_E/c^2 in the underlying 2D simulation data and the outflow rate is ~10 L_E/c^2 (with LE and c being the Eddington luminosity and speed of light, respectively). We first confirm the emergence of clumpy outflow, which was discovered by the 2D RHD simulations, above the photosphere located at a few hundreds of Schwarzschild radii (r_S) from the central black hole. As prominent 3D features we find that the clumps have the shape of a torn sheet, rather than a cut string, and that they are rotating around the central black hole with a sub-Keplerian velocity at a distance of ~10^3 r_S from the center. The typical clump size is ~30 r_S or less in the radial direction, and is more elongated in the angular directions, ~hundreds of r_S at most. The sheet separation ranges from 50 to 150 r_S. We expect stochastic time variations when clumps pass across the line of the sight of a distant observer. Variation timescales are estimated to be several seconds for a black hole with mass of ten to several tens of Msun, in rough agreement with the observations of some ultra-luminous X-ray sources.
  • X-ray continuum spectra of super-Eddington accretion flow are studied by means of Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations based on the radiation hydrodynamic simulation data, in which both of thermal and bulk Compton scatterings are taken into account. We compare the calculated spectra of accretion flow around black holes with masses of $M_{\rm BH} = 10, 10^2, 10^3$, and $10^4 M_\odot$ for a fixed mass injection rate (from the computational boundary at $10^3 r_{\rm s}$) of $10^3 L_{\rm Edd}/c^2$ (with $r_{\rm s}$, $L_{\rm Edd}$, and $c$ being the Schwarzschild radius, the Eddington luminosity, and the speed of light, respectively). The soft X-ray spectra exhibit mass dependence in accordance with the standard-disk relation; the maximum surface temperature is scaled as $T \propto M_{\rm BH}^{-1/4}$. The spectra in the hard X-ray bands, by contrast, look quite similar among different models, if we normalize the radiation luminosity by $M_{\rm BH}$. This reflects that the hard component is created by thermal and bulk Compton scattering of soft photons originating from an accretion flow in the over-heated and/or funnel regions, the temperatures of which have no mass dependence. The hard X-ray spectra can be reproduced by a Wien spectrum with temperature of $T\sim 3$ keV accompanied by a hard excess at photon energy above several keV. The excess spectrum can be well fitted with a power law with a photon index of $\Gamma \sim 3$. This feature is in good agreement with that of the recent NuSTAR observations of ULX (Ultra-Luminous X-ray sources).
  • A possibility of time-delayed radio brightenings of Sgr A* triggered by the pericenter passage of the G2 cloud is studied by carrying out global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations taking into account the radiative cooling of the tidal debris of the G2 cloud. Magnetic fields in the accretion flow are strongly perturbed and re-organized after the passage of G2. We have found that the magnetic energy in the accretion flow increases by a factor 3-4 in 5-10 years after the pericenter passage of G2 by a dynamo mechanism driven by the magneto-rotational instability. Since this B-field amplification enhances the synchrotron emission from the disk and the outflow, the radio and the infrared luminosity of Sgr A* is expected to increase around A.D. 2020. The time-delay of the radio brightening enables us to determine the rotation axis of the preexisting disk.
  • The formation mechanism of CO clouds observed with NANTEN2 and Mopra telescope toward the stellar cluster Westerlund 2 is studied by three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations taking into account the interstellar cooling. These molecular clouds show a peculiar shape composing of an arc-shaped cloud in one side of a TeV-ray source HESS J1023-575 and a linear distribution of clouds (jet clouds) in another side. We propose that these clouds are formed by the interaction of a jet with interstellar neutral hydrogen (HI) clumps. By studying the dependence of the shape of dense cold clouds formed by shock compression and cooling on the filling factor of HI clumps, we found that the density distribution of HI clumps determines the shape of molecular clouds formed by the jet-cloud interaction; arc-clouds are formed when the filling factor is large. On the other hand, when the filling factor is small, molecular clouds align with the jet. The jet propagates faster in models with small filling factors.
  • Prompted by the recent discovery of pulsed emission from an ultra-luminous X-ray source, M82 X-2 ("ULX-pulsar"), we perform a two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of a super-critical accretion flow onto a neutron star through a narrow accretion column. We set an accretion column with a cone shape filled with tenuous gas with density of $10^{-4} {\rm g}~ {\rm cm}^{-3}$ above a neutron star and solve the two dimensional gas motion and radiative transfer within the column. The side boundaries are set such that radiation can freely escape, while gas cannot. Since the initial gas layer is not in a hydrostatic balance, the column gas falls onto the neutron-star surface, thereby a shock being generated. As a result, the accretion column is composed of two regions: an upper, nearly free-fall region and a lower settling region, as was noted by Basko \& Sunyaev (1976). The average accretion rate is very high; ${\dot M}\sim 10^{2-3} L_{\rm E}/c^2$ (with $L_{\rm E}$ being the Eddington luminosity), and so radiation energy dominates over gas internal energy entirely within the column. Despite the high accretion rate, the radiation flux in the laboratory frame is kept barely below $L_{\rm E}/(4\pi r^2)$ at a distance $r$ in the settling region so that matter can slowly accrete. This adjustment is made possible, since large amount of photons produced via dissipation of kinetic energy of matter can escape through the side boundaries. The total luminosity can greatly exceed $L_{\rm E}$ by several orders of magnitude, whereas the apparent luminosity observed from the top of the column is much less. Due to such highly anisotropic radiation fields, observed flux should exhibit periodic variations with the rotation period, provided that the rotation and magnetic axes are misaligned.
  • Using three-dimensional general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics simulations of accretion flows around stellar mass black holes, we report that the relatively cold disk ($\gtrsim 10^{7}$K) is truncated near the black hole. Hot and less-dense regions, of which the gas temperature is $ \gtrsim 10^9$K and more than ten times higher than the radiation temperature (overheated regions), appear within the truncation radius. The overheated regions also appear above as well as below the disk, and sandwich the cold disk, leading to the effective Compton upscattering. The truncation radius is $\sim 30 r_{\rm g}$ for $\dot{M} \sim L_{\rm Edd}/c^2$, where $r_{\rm g}, \dot M, L_\mathrm{Edd}, c$ are the gravitational radius, mass accretion rate, Eddington luminosity, and light speed. Our results are consistent with observations of very high state, whereby the truncated disk is thought to be embedded in the hot rarefied regions. The truncation radius shifts inward to $\sim 10 r_{\rm g}$ with increasing mass accretion rate $\dot{M} \sim 100 L_{\rm Edd}/c^2$, which is very close to an innermost stable circular orbit. This model corresponds to the slim disk state observed in ultra luminous X-ray sources. Although the overheated regions shrink if the Compton cooling effectively reduces the gas temperature, the sandwich-structure does not disappear at the range of $\dot{M} \lesssim 100L_{\rm Edd}/c^2$. Our simulations also reveal that the gas temperature in the overheated regions depends on black hole spin, which would be due to efficient energy transport from black hole to disks through the Poynting flux, resulting gas heating.
  • By performing two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations with large computational domain of 5000 Schwarzschild radius, we revealed that wide-angle outflow is launched via the radiation force from the super-critical accretion flows around black holes. The angular size of the outflow, of which the radial velocity (v_r) is over the escape velocity (v_esc), increases with an increase of the distance from the black hole. As a result, the mass is blown away with speed of v_r > v_esc in all direction except for the very vicinity of the equatorial plane, theta=0-85^circ, where theta is the polar angle. The mass ejected from the outer boundary per unit time by the outflow is larger than the mass accretion rate onto the black hole, ~150L_Edd/c^2, where L_Edd and c are the Eddington luminosity and the speed of light. Kinetic power of such wide-angle high-velocity outflow is comparable to the photon luminosity and is a few times larger than the Eddington luminosity. This corresponds to ~10^39-10^40 erg/s for the stellar mass black holes. Our model consistent with the observations of shock excited bubbles observed in some ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs), supporting a hypothesis that ULXs are powered by the super-critical accretion onto stellar mass black holes.
  • The tidal disruption event by a supermassive black hole in Swift J1644+57 can trigger limit-cycle oscillations between a supercritically accreting X-ray bright state and a subcritically accreting X-ray dim state. Time evolution of the debris gas around a black hole with mass $M=10^{6} {\MO}$ is studied by performing axisymmetric, two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations. We assumed the $\alpha$-prescription of viscosity, in which the viscous stress is proportional to the total pressure. The mass supply rate from the outer boundary is assumed to be ${\dot M}_{\rm supply}=100L_{\rm Edd}/c^2$, where $L_{\rm Edd}$ is the Eddington luminosity, and $c$ is the light speed. Since the mass accretion rate decreases inward by outflows driven by radiation pressure, the state transition from a supercritically accreting slim disk state to a subcritically accreting Shakura-Sunyaev disk starts from the inner disk and propagates outward in a timescale of a day. The sudden drop of the X-ray flux observed in Swift J1644+57 in August 2012 can be explained by this transition. As long as ${\dot M}_{\rm supply}$ exceeds the threshold for the existence of a radiation pressure dominant disk, accumulation of the accreting gas in the subcritically accreting region triggers the transition from a gas pressure dominant Shakura-Sunyaev disk to a slim disk. This transition takes place at $t {\sim}~50/({\alpha}/0.1)$ days after the X-ray darkening. We expect that if $\alpha > 0.01$, X-ray emission with luminosity $\gtrsim 10^{44}$ ${\rm erg}{\cdot}{\rm s}^{-1}$ and jet ejection will revive in Swift J1644+57 in 2013--2014.
  • Supercritical accretion flows inevitably produce radiation-pressure driven outflows, which will Compton up-scatter soft photons from the underlying accretion flow, thereby making hard emission. We perform two dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations of supercritical accretion flows and outflows, incorporating such Compton scattering effects, and demonstrate that there appears a new hard spectral state at higher photon luminosities than that of the slim-disk state. In this state, as the photon luminosity increases, the photon index decreases and the fraction of the hard emission increases. The Compton $y$-parameter is of the order of unity (and thus the photon index will be $\sim 2$) when the apparent photon luminosity is ${\sim}30L_{\rm E}$ (with $L_{\rm E}$ being the Eddington luminosity) for nearly face-on sources. This explains the observed spectral hardening of the ULX NGC1313 X-2 in its brightening phase and thus supports the model of supercritical accretion onto stellar mass black holes in this ULX.