• The observed value $\Lambda_{\rm obs}$ of the cosmological constant $\Lambda$ is extremely smaller than theoretical expectations, and the anthropic argument has been proposed as a solution to this problem because galaxies do not form when $\Lambda \gg \Lambda_{\rm obs}$. However, the contemporary galaxy formation theory predicts that stars form even with a high value of $\Lambda / \Lambda_{\rm obs} \sim$ 50, which makes the anthropic argument less persuasive. Here we calculate the probability distribution of $\Lambda$ using a model of cosmological galaxy formation, considering extinction of observers caused by radiation from nearby supernovae. The life survival probability decreases in a large $\Lambda$ universe because of higher stellar density. Using a reasonable rate of lethal supernovae, we find that the mean expectation value of $\Lambda$ can be close to $\Lambda_{\rm obs}$, and hence this effect may be essential to understand the small but nonzero value of $\Lambda$. It is predicted that we are located on the edge of habitable regions about stellar density, which may be tested in future exoplanet studies.
  • Intrinsic alignments (IA), the coherent alignment of intrinsic galaxy orientations, can be a source of a systematic error of weak lensing surveys. The redshift evolution of IA also contains information about the physics of galaxy formation and evolution. This paper presents the first measurement of IA at high redshift, $z\sim 1.4$, using the spectroscopic catalog of blue star-forming galaxies of the FastSound redshift survey, with the galaxy shape information from the Canada-Hawaii-France telescope lensing survey. The IA signal is consistent with zero with power-law amplitudes fitted to the projected correlation functions for density-shape and shape-shape correlation components, $A_{\delta+}=-0.0071\pm 0.1340$ and $A_{++}=-0.0505\pm 0.0848$, respectively. These results are consistent with those obtained from blue galaxies at lower redshifts (e.g., $A_{\delta+}=0.0035_{-0.0389}^{+0.0387}$ and $A_{++}=0.0045_{-0.0168}^{+0.0166}$ at $z=0.51$ from the WiggleZ survey). The upper limit of the constrained IA amplitude corresponds to a few percent contamination to the weak-lensing shear power spectrum, resulting in systematic uncertainties on the cosmological parameter estimations by $-0.052<\Delta \sigma_8<0.039$ and $-0.039<\Delta \Omega_m<0.030$.
  • Detectability of isolated black holes (IBHs) without a companion star but emitting X-rays by accretion from dense interstellar medium (ISM) or molecular cloud gas is investigated. We calculate orbits of IBHs in the Galaxy to derive a realistic spatial distribution of IBHs, for various mean values of kick velocity at their birth $\upsilon_{\rm avg}$. X-ray luminosities of these IBHs are then calculated considering various phases of ISM and molecular clouds, for a wide range of the accretion efficiency $\lambda$ (a ratio of the actual accretion rate to the Bondi rate) that is rather uncertain. It is found that detectable IBHs mostly reside near the Galactic Centre (GC), and hence taking the Galactic structure into account is essential. In the hard X-ray band, where identification of IBHs from other contaminating X-ray sources may be easier, the expected number of IBHs detectable by the past survey by NuSTAR towards GC is at most order unity. However, 30--100 IBHs may be detected by the future survey by FORCE with an optimistic parameter set of $\upsilon_{\rm avg} = 50 \ \mathrm{km\ s^{-1}}$ and $\lambda = 0.1$, implying that it may be possible to detect IBHs or constrain the model parameters.
  • The Fermi bubbles were possibly created by large injections of energy into the Galactic Center (GC), either by an active galactic nucleus (AGN) or by nuclear starburst more than ~10 Myr ago. However, the origin of the diffuse gamma-ray emission associated with Loop I, a radio continuum loop spanning across 100 deg on the sky, is still being debated. The northern-most part of Loop I, known as the North Polar Spur (NPS), is the brightest arm and is even clearly visible in the ROSAT X-ray sky map. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review on the X-ray observations of the Fermi bubbles and their possible association with the NPS and Loop I structures. Using uniform analysis of archival Suzaku and Swift data, we show that X-ray plasma with kT ~ 0.3 keV and low metal abundance (Z ~ 0.2 Z_solar) is ubiquitous in both the bubbles and Loop I and is naturally interpreted as weakly shock-heated Galactic halo gas. However, the observed asymmetry of the X-ray-emitting gas above and below the GC has still not been resolved; it cannot be fully explained by the inclination of the axis of the Fermi bubbles to the Galactic disk normal. We argue that the NPS and Loop I may be asymmetric remnants of a large explosion that occurred before the event that created the Fermi bubbles, and that the soft gamma-ray emission from Loop I may be due to either pi^0 decay of accelerated protons or electron bremsstrahlung.
  • Most of fast radio bursts (FRB) do not show evidence for repetition, and such non-repeating FRBs may be produced at the time of a merger of binary neutron stars (BNS), provided that the BNS merger rate is close to the high end of the currently possible range. However, the merger environment is polluted by dynamical ejecta, which may prohibit the radio signal to propagate. We examine this by using a general-relativistic simulation of a BNS merger, and show that the ejecta appears about 1 ms after the rotation speed of the merged star becomes the maximum. Therefore there is a time window in which an FRB signal can reach outside, and the short duration of non-repeating FRBs can be explained by screening after ejecta formation. A fraction of BNS mergers may leave a rapidly rotating and stable neutron star, and such objects may be the origin of repeating FRBs like FRB 121102. We show that a merger remnant would appear as a repeating FRB in a time scale of about 1-10 yrs, and expected properties are consistent with the observations of FRB 121102. We construct an FRB rate evolution model including these two populations of repeating and non-repeating FRBs from BNS mergers, and show that the detection rate of repeating FRBs relative to non-repeating ones rapidly increases with improving search sensitivity. This may explain that the only repeating FRB 121102 was discovered by the most sensitive FRB search with Arecibo. Several predictions are made, including appearance of a repeating FRB 1-10 years after a BNS merger that is localized by gravitational wave and subsequent electromagnetic radiation.
  • We present a new theoretical modeling to predict luminosity and spectrum of gamma-ray and neutrino emission of a star-forming galaxy, from star formation rate ($\psi$), gas mass ($M_{\rm gas}$), stellar mass, and disk size, taking into account production, propagation and interactions of cosmic rays. The model reproduces the observed gamma-ray luminosities of nearby galaxies detected by {\it Fermi} better than the simple power-law models as a function of $\psi$ or $\psi M_{\rm gas}$. Then this model is used to predict the cosmic background flux of gamma-ray and neutrinos from star-forming galaxies, by using a semi-analytical model of cosmological galaxy formation that reproduces many observed quantities of local and high-redshift galaxies. Calibration of the model using gamma-ray luminosities of nearby galaxies allows us to make a more reliable prediction than previous studies. In our baseline model star-forming galaxies produce about 20% of isotropic gamma-ray background unresolved by {\it Fermi}, and only 0.5% of IceCube neutrinos. Even with an extreme model assuming a hard injection cosmic-ray spectral index of 2.0 for all galaxies, at most 22% of IceCube neutrinos can be accounted for. These results indicate that it is difficult to explain most of IceCube neutrinos by star-forming galaxies, without violating the gamma-ray constraints from nearby galaxies.
  • In standard general relativity the universe cannot be started with arbitrary initial conditions, because four of the ten components of the Einstein's field equations (EFE) are constraints on initial conditions. In the previous work it was proposed to extend the gravity theory to allow free initial conditions, with a motivation to solve the cosmological constant problem. This was done by setting four constraints on metric variations in the action principle, which is reasonable because the gravity's physical degrees of freedom are at most six. However, there are two problems about this theory; the three constraints in addition to the unimodular condition were introduced without clear physical meanings, and the flat Minkowski spacetime is unstable against perturbations. Here a new set of gravitational field equations is derived by replacing the three constraints with new ones requiring that geodesic paths remain geodesic against metric variations. The instability problem is then naturally solved. Implications for the cosmological constant $\Lambda$ are unchanged; the theory converges into EFE with nonzero $\Lambda$ by inflation, but $\Lambda$ varies on scales much larger than the present Hubble horizon. Then galaxies are formed only in small $\Lambda$ regions, and the cosmological constant problem is solved by the anthropic argument. Because of the increased degrees of freedom in metric dynamics, the theory predicts new non-oscillatory modes of metric anisotropy generated by quantum fluctuation during inflation, and CMB B-mode polarization would be observed differently from the standard predictions by general relativity.
  • We detect 20 $z=7.0$ Ly$\alpha$ emitter (LAE) candidates to $L({\rm Ly}\alpha) \geq 2 \times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$ or $0.3$ $L^*_{z=7}$ and in $6.1\times 10^5$ Mpc$^3$ volume in the Subaru Deep Field and the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey field by 82 and 37 hours of Subaru Suprime-Cam narrowband NB973 and reddest optical $y$-band imaging. We compare their Ly$\alpha$ and UV luminosity functions (LFs) and densities and Ly$\alpha$ equivalent widths (EWs) to those of $z=5.7$, 6.6 and 7.3 LAEs from previous Suprime-Cam surveys. The Ly$\alpha$ LF (density) rapidly declines by a factor of $\times$1.5 (1.9) in $L({\rm Ly}\alpha)$ at $z=5.7-6.6$ (160 Myr), $\times$1.5 (1.6) at $z=6.6-7.0$ (60 Myr) at the faint end and $\times$2.0 (3.8) at $z=7.0-7.3$ (40 Myr). Also, in addition to the systematic decrease in EW at $z=5.7-6.6$ previously found, 2/3 of the $z=7.0$ LAEs detected in the UV continuum exhibit lower EWs than the $z=6.6$ ones. Moreover, while the UV LF and density do not evolve at $z=5.7-6.6$, they modestly decline at $z=6.6-7.0$, implying galaxy evolution contributing to the decline of the Ly$\alpha$ LF. Comparison of the $z=7.0$ Ly$\alpha$ LF to the one predicted by an LAE evolution model further reveals that galaxy evolution alone cannot explain all the decline of Ly$\alpha$ LF. If we attribute the discrepancy to Ly$\alpha$ attenuation by neutral hydrogen, the intergalactic medium transmission of Ly$\alpha$ photons at $z=7.0$ would be $T_{{\rm Ly}\alpha}^{\rm IGM} \leq 0.6-0.7$. It is lower (higher) than $T_{{\rm Ly}\alpha}^{\rm IGM}$ at $z=6.6$ (7.3) derived by previous studies, suggesting rapid increase in neutral fraction at $z > 6$.
  • The anthropic principle is one of the possible explanations for the cosmological constant ($\Lambda$) problem. In previous studies, a dark halo mass threshold comparable with our Galaxy must be assumed in galaxy formation to get a reasonably large probability of finding the observed small value, $P(<$$\Lambda_{\rm obs})$, though stars are found in much smaller galaxies as well. Here we examine the anthropic argument by using a semi-analytic model of cosmological galaxy formation, which can reproduce many observations such as galaxy luminosity functions. We calculate the probability distribution of $\Lambda$ by running the model code for a wide range of $\Lambda$, while other cosmological parameters and model parameters for baryonic processes of galaxy formation are kept constant. Assuming that the prior probability distribution is flat per unit $\Lambda$, and that the number of observers is proportional to stellar mass, we find $P(<$$\Lambda_{\rm obs}) = 6.7 \%$ without introducing any galaxy mass threshold. We also investigate the effect of metallicity; we find $P(<$$\Lambda_{\rm obs}) = 9.0 \%$ if observers exist only in galaxies whose metallicity is higher than the solar abundance. If the number of observers is proportional to metallicity, we find $P(<$$\Lambda_{\rm obs}) = 9.7 \%$. Since these probabilities are not extremely small, we conclude that the anthropic argument is a viable explanation, if the value of $\Lambda$ observed in our universe is determined by a probability distribution.
  • Deriving the Einstein field equations (EFE) with matter fluid from the action principle is not straightforward, because mass conservation must be added as an additional constraint to make rest-frame mass density variable in reaction to metric variation. This can be avoided by introducing a constraint $\delta(\sqrt{-g}) = 0$ to metric variations $\delta g^{\mu\nu}$, and then the cosmological constant $\Lambda$ emerges as an integration constant. This is a removal of one of the four constraints on initial conditions forced by EFE at the birth of the universe, and it may imply that EFE are unnecessarily restrictive about initial conditions. I then adopt a principle that the theory of gravity should be able to solve time evolution starting from arbitrary inhomogeneous initial conditions about spacetime and matter. The equations of gravitational fields satisfying this principle are obtained, by setting four auxiliary constraints on $\delta g^{\mu\nu}$ to extract six degrees of freedom for gravity. The cost of achieving this is a loss of general covariance, but these equations constitute a consistent theory if they hold in the special coordinate systems that can be uniquely specified with respect to the initial space-like hypersurface when the universe was born. This theory predicts that gravity is described by EFE with non-zero $\Lambda$ in a homogeneous patch of the universe created by inflation, but $\Lambda$ changes continuously across different patches. Then both the smallness and coincidence problems of the cosmological constant are solved by the anthropic argument. This is just a result of inhomogeneous initial conditions, not requiring any change of the fundamental physical laws in different patches.
  • Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are a mysterious flash phenomenon detected in radio wavelengths with a duration of only a few milliseconds, and they may also have prompt gamma-ray flashes. Here we carry out a blind search for msec-duration gamma-ray flashes using the 7-year Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) all-sky gamma-ray data. About 100 flash candidates are detected, but after removing those associated with bright steady point sources, we find no flash events at high Galactic latitude region (|b|>20 deg). Events at lower latitude regions are consistent with statistical flukes originating from the diffuse gamma-ray background. From these results, we place an upper limit on the GeV gamma-ray to radio flux ratio of FRBs as xi \equiv (nu L_nu)_gamma / (nu L_nu)_radio < 10^8, depending on the assumed FRB rate evolution. This limit is comparable with the largest value found for pulsars, though xi of pulsars is distributed in a wide range. We also compare this limit with the spectral energy distribution of the 2004 giant flare of the magnetar SGR 1806-20.
  • We present basic properties of $\sim$3,300 emission line galaxies detected by the FastSound survey, which are mostly H$\alpha$ emitters at $z \sim$ 1.2-1.5 in the total area of about 20 deg$^2$, with the H$\alpha$ flux sensitivity limit of $\sim 1.6 \times 10^{-16} \rm erg \ cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ at 4.5 sigma. This paper presents the catalogs of the FastSound emission lines and galaxies, which will be open to the public in the near future. We also present basic properties of typical FastSound H$\alpha$ emitters, which have H$\alpha$ luminosities of $10^{41.8}$-$10^{43.3}$ erg/s, SFRs of 20--500 $M_\odot$/yr, and stellar masses of $10^{10.0}$--$10^{11.3}$ $M_\odot$. The 3D distribution maps for the four fields of CFHTLS W1--4 are presented, clearly showing large scale clustering of galaxies at the scale of $\sim$ 100--600 comoving Mpc. Based on 1,105 galaxies with detections of multiple emission lines, we estimate that contamination of non-H$\alpha$ lines is about 4% in the single-line emission galaxies, which are mostly [OIII]$\lambda$5007. This contamination fraction is also confirmed by the stacked spectrum of all the FastSound spectra, in which H$\alpha$, [NII]$\lambda \lambda$6548,6583, [SII]$\lambda \lambda$6717, 6731, and [OI]$\lambda \lambda$6300,6364 are seen.
  • We measure the redshift-space correlation function from a spectroscopic sample of 2783 emission line galaxies from the FastSound survey. The survey, which uses the Subaru Telescope and covers the redshift ranges of $1.19<z<1.55$, is the first cosmological study at such high redshifts. We detect clear anisotropy due to redshift-space distortions (RSD) both in the correlation function as a function of separations parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight and its quadrupole moment. RSD has been extensively used to test general relativity on cosmological scales at $z<1$. Adopting a LCDM cosmology with the fixed expansion history and no velocity dispersion $\sigma_{\rm v}=0$, and using the RSD measurements on scales above 8Mpc/h, we obtain the first constraint on the growth rate at the redshift, $f(z)\sigma_8(z)=0.482\pm 0.116$ at $z\sim 1.4$ after marginalizing over the galaxy bias parameter $b(z)\sigma_8(z)$. This corresponds to $4.2\sigma$ detection of RSD. Our constraint is consistent with the prediction of general relativity $f\sigma_8\sim 0.392$ within the $1-\sigma$ confidence level. When we allow $\sigma_{\rm v}$ to vary and marginalize it over, the growth rate constraint becomes $f\sigma_8=0.494^{+0.126}_{-0.120}$. We also demonstrate that by combining with the low-z constraints on $f\sigma_8$, high-z galaxy surveys like the FastSound can be useful to distinguish modified gravity models without relying on CMB anisotropy experiments.
  • The unprecedentedly bright afterglow of Swift GRB 130606A at z = 5.91 gave us a unique opportunity to probe the reionization era by high precision analyses of the redward damping wing of Ly alpha absorption, but the reported constraints on the neutral hydrogen fraction (f_HI) in intergalactic medium (IGM) derived from spectra taken by different telescopes are in contradiction. Here we examine the origin of this discrepancy by analyzing the spectrum taken by VLT with our own analysis code previously used to fit the Subaru spectrum. Though the VLT team reported no evidence for IGM HI using the VLT spectrum, we confirmed our previous result of preferring non-zero IGM HI (the best-fit f_HI ~ 0.06, when IGM HI extends to the GRB redshift). The fit residuals of the VLT spectrum by the model without IGM HI show the same systematic trend as the Subaru spectrum. We consider that the likely origin of the discrepancy between the two teams is the difference of the wavelength ranges adopted in the fittings; our wavelength range is wider than that of the VLT team, and also we avoided the shortest wavelength range of deep Ly alpha absorption (lambda_obs < 8426 A), because this region is dominated by HI in the host galaxy and the systematic uncertainty about host HI velocity distribution is large. We also study the sensitivity of these results to the adopted Ly alpha cross section formulae, ranging from the classical Lorentzian function to the most recent one taking into account fully quantum mechanical scattering. It is found that the preference for non-zero IGM HI is robust against the choice of the cross section formulae, but it is quantitatively not negligible and hence one should be careful in future analyses.
  • We present the results from a large near-infrared spectroscopic survey with Subaru/FMOS (\textit{FastSound}) consisting of $\sim$ 4,000 galaxies at $z\sim1.4$ with significant H$\alpha$ detection. We measure the gas-phase metallicity from the [N~{\sc ii}]$\lambda$6583/H$\alpha$ emission line ratio of the composite spectra in various stellar mass and star-formation rate bins. The resulting mass-metallicity relation generally agrees with previous studies obtained in a similar redshift range to that of our sample. No clear dependence of the mass-metallicity relation with star-formation rate is found. Our result at $z\sim1.4$ is roughly in agreement with the fundamental metallicity relation at $z\sim0.1$ with fiber aperture corrected star-formation rate. We detect significant [S~{\sc ii}]$\lambda\lambda$6716,6731 emission lines from the composite spectra. The electron density estimated from the [S~{\sc ii}]$\lambda\lambda$6716,6731 line ratio ranges from 10 -- 500 cm$^{-3}$, which generally agrees with that of local galaxies. On the other hand, the distribution of our sample on [N~{\sc ii}]$\lambda$6583/H$\alpha$ vs. [S~{\sc ii}]$\lambda\lambda$6716,6731/H$\alpha$ is different from that found locally. We estimate the nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio (N/O) from the N2S2 index, and find that the N/O in galaxies at $z\sim1.4$ is significantly higher than the local values at a fixed metallicity and stellar mass. The metallicity at $z\sim1.4$ recalculated with this N/O enhancement taken into account decreases by 0.1 -- 0.2 dex. The resulting metallicity is lower than the local fundamental metallicity relation.
  • FastSound is a galaxy redshift survey using the near-infrared Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope, targeting H$\alpha$ emitters at $z \sim 1.18$--$1.54$ down to the sensitivity limit of H$\alpha$ flux $\sim 2 \times 10^{-16} \ \rm erg \ cm^{-2} s^{-1}$. The primary goal of the survey is to detect redshift space distortions (RSD), to test General Relativity by measuring the growth rate of large scale structure and to constrain modified gravity models for the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. The target galaxies were selected based on photometric redshifts and H$\alpha$ flux estimates calculated by fitting spectral energy distribution (SED) models to the five optical magnitudes of the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) Wide catalog. The survey started in March 2012, and all the observations were completed in July 2014. In total, we achieved $121$ pointings of FMOS (each pointing has a $30$ arcmin diameter circular footprint) covering $20.6$ deg$^2$ by tiling the four fields of the CFHTLS Wide in a hexagonal pattern. Emission lines were detected from $\sim 4,000$ star forming galaxies by an automatic line detection algorithm applied to 2D spectral images. This is the first in a series of papers based on FastSound data, and we describe the details of the survey design, target selection, observations, data reduction, and emission line detections.
  • The Fermi bubbles are gigantic gamma-ray structures in our Galaxy. The physical origin of the bubbles is still under debate. The leading scenarios can be divided into two categories. One is the nuclear star forming activity similar to extragalactic starburst galaxies and the other is the past active galactic nucleus (AGN) like activity of the Galactic center supermassive black hole. In this paper, we propose that metal abundance measurements will provide an important clue to probe their origin. Based on a simple spherically symmetric bubble model, we find that the generated metallicity and abundance pattern of the bubbles' gas strongly depend on assumed star formation or AGN activities. Star formation scenarios predict higher metallicities and abundance ratios of [O/Fe] and [Ne/Fe] than AGN scenarios do because of supernovae ejecta. Furthermore, the resultant abundance depends on the gamma-ray emission process because different mass injection histories are required for the different gamma-ray emission processes due to the acceleration and cooling time scales of non-thermal particles. Future X-ray missions such as ASTRO-H and Athena will give a clue to probe the origin of the bubbles through abundance measurements with their high energy resolution instruments.
  • We describe the development of automated emission line detection software for the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS), which is a near-infrared spectrograph fed by $400$ fibers from the $0.2$ deg$^2$ prime focus field of view of the Subaru Telescope. The software, FIELD (FMOS software for Image-based Emission Line Detection), is developed and tested mainly for the FastSound survey, which is targeting H$\alpha$ emitting galaxies at $z \sim 1.3$ to measure the redshift space distortion as a test of general relativity beyond $z \sim 1$. The basic algorithm is to calculate the line signal-to-noise ratio ($S/N$) along the wavelength direction, given by a 2-D convolution of the spectral image and a detection kernel representing a typical emission line profile. A unique feature of FMOS is its use of OH airglow suppression masks, requiring the use of flat-field images to suppress noise around the mask regions. Bad pixels on the detectors and pixels affected by cosmic-rays are efficiently removed by using the information obtained from the FMOS analysis pipeline. We limit the range of acceptable line-shape parameters for the detected candidates to further improve the reliability of line detection. The final performance of line detection is tested using a subset of the FastSound data; the false detection rate of spurious objects is examined by using inverted frames obtained by exchanging object and sky frames. The false detection rate is $< 1$\% at $S/N > 5$, allowing an efficient and objective emission line search for FMOS data at the line flux level of $\gtrsim 1.0 \times 10^{-16}$[erg/cm$^2$/s].
  • We discuss how we can detect and identify counterparts of fast radio bursts (FRBs) in future optical follow up observations of FRBs if real-time alert of FRBs becomes available. We consider kilonovae as candidates of FRB optical counterparts, as expected in the case that FRBs originate from mergers of double neutron star binaries. Although theoretical predictions on luminosities of kilonovae are still highly uncertain, recent models suggest that kilonovae can be detected at redshifts up to z $\sim$ 0.3 within the range of the uncertainties. We expect $\sim$ 1--5 unrelated supernovae (SNe) down to a similar variability magnitude in 5 days interval within the typical error radius of a FRB. We show that, however, a kilonova can be distinguished from these SNe by its rapid decay and/or color evolution, making it possible to verify the existence of a kilonova associated with a FRB. We also discuss the case that SNe Ia are FRB optical counterparts, as it might be if FRBs originate from double white dwarf binaries. Verification of this scenario is also possible, since the chance probability of finding a SNe Ia having consistent explosion time with that of a FRB within the FRB error region is small (typically $\lesssim$ 0.01).
  • We present a new version of a semi-analytic model of cosmological galaxy formation, incorporating a star formation law with a feedback depending on the galaxy-scale mean dust opacity and metallicity, motivated by recent observations of star formation in nearby galaxies and theoretical considerations. This new model is used to investigate the effect of such a feedback on shaping the galaxy luminosity function and its evolution. Star formation activity is significantly suppressed in dwarf galaxies by the new feedback effect, and the faint-end slope of local luminosity functions can be reproduced with a reasonable strength of supernova feedback, which is in contrast to the previous models that require a rather extreme strength of supernova feedback. Our model can also reproduce the early appearance of massive galaxies manifested in the bright-end of high redshift K-band luminosity functions. Though some of the previous models also succeeded in reproducing this, they assumed a star formation law depending on the galaxy-scale dynamical time, which is not supported by observations. We argue that the feedback depending on dust opacity (or metal column density) is essential, rather than that simply depending on gas column density, to get these results.
  • The unprecedentedly bright optical afterglow of GRB 130606A located by Swift at a redshift close to the reionization era (z = 5.913) provides a new opportunity to probe the ionization status of intergalactic medium (IGM). Here we present an analysis of the red Ly alpha damping wing of the afterglow spectrum taken by Subaru/FOCAS during 10.4-13.2 hr after the burst. We find that the minimal model including only the baseline power-law and HI absorption in the host galaxy does not give a good fit, leaving residuals showing concave curvature in 8400-8900 A with an amplitude of about 0.6% of the flux. Such a curvature in the short wavelength range cannot be explained either by extinction at the host with standard extinction curves, intrinsic curvature of afterglow spectra, or by the known systematic uncertainties in the observed spectrum. The red damping wing by intervening HI gas outside the host can reduce the residual by about 3 sigma statistical significance. We find that a damped Ly alpha system is not favored as the origin of this intervening HI absorption, from the observed Ly beta and metal absorption features. Therefore absorption by diffuse IGM remains as a plausible explanation. A fit by a simple uniform IGM model requires HI neutral fraction of f_HI ~ 0.1-0.5 depending on the distance to the GRB host, implying high f_HI IGM associated with the observed dark Gunn-Peterson (GP) troughs. This gives a new evidence that the reionization is not yet complete at z ~ 6.
  • We present measurements of the rates of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae derived from the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS). We carried out repeat deep imaging observations with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope, and detected 1040 variable objects over 0.918 deg$^2$ in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field. From the imaging observations, light curves in the observed $i'$-band are constructed for all objects, and we fit the observed light curves with template light curves. Out of the 1040 variable objects detected by the SXDS, 39 objects over the redshift range $0.2 < z < 1.4$ are classified as Type Ia supernovae using the light curves. These are among the most distant SN Ia rate measurements to date. We find that the Type Ia supernova rate increase up to $z \sim 0.8$ and may then flatten at higher redshift. The rates can be fitted by a simple power law, $r_V(z)=r_0(1+z)^\alpha$ with $r_0=0.20^{+0.52}_{-0.16}$(stat.)$^{+0.26}_{-0.07}$(syst.)$\times 10^{-4} {\rm yr}^{-1}{\rm Mpc}^{-3}$, and $\alpha=2.04^{+1.84}_{-1.96}$(stat.)$^{+2.11}_{-0.86}$(syst.).
  • The efficient selection of high-redshift emission galaxies is important for future large galaxy redshift surveys for cosmology. Here we describe the target selection methods for the FastSound project, a redshift survey for H alpha emitting galaxies at z=1.2-1.5 using Subaru/FMOS to measure the linear growth rate f\sigma 8 via Redshift Space Distortion (RSD) and constrain the theory of gravity. To select ~400 target galaxies in the 0.2 deg^2 FMOS field-of-view from photometric data of CFHTLS-Wide (u*g'r'i'z'), we test several different methods based on color-color diagrams or photometric redshift estimates from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We also test the improvement in selection efficiency that can be achieved by adding near-infrared data from the UKIDSS DXS (J). The success rates of H alpha detection with FMOS averaged over two observed fields using these methods are 11.3% (color-color, optical), 13.6% (color-color, optical+NIR), 17.3% (photo-z, optical), and 15.1% (photo-z, optical+NIR). Selection from photometric redshifts tends to give a better efficiency than color-based methods, although there is no significant improvement by adding J band data within the statistical scatter. We also investigate the main limiting factors for the success rate, by using the sample of the HiZELS H alpha emitters that were selected by narrow-band imaging. Although the number density of total H alpha emitters having higher H alpha fluxes than the FMOS sensitivity is comparable with the FMOS fiber density, the limited accuracy of photometric redshift and H alpha flux estimations have comparable effects on the success rate of <~20% obtained from SED fitting.
  • Fast radio bursts (FRBs) at cosmological distances have recently been discovered, whose duration is about milliseconds. We argue that the observed short duration is difficult to explain by giant flares of soft gamma-ray repeaters, though their event rate and energetics are consistent with FRBs. Here we discuss binary neutron star (NS-NS) mergers as a possible origin of FRBs. The FRB rate is within the plausible range of NS-NS merger rate and its cosmological evolution, while a large fraction of NS-NS mergers must produce observable FRBs. A likely radiation mechanism is coherent radio emission like radio pulsars, by magnetic braking when magnetic fields of neutron stars are synchronized to binary rotation at the time of coalescence. Magnetic fields of the standard strength (~ 10^{12-13} G) can explain the observed FRB fluxes, if the conversion efficiency from magnetic braking energy loss to radio emission is similar to that of isolated radio pulsars. Corresponding gamma-ray emission is difficult to detect by current or past gamma-ray burst satellites. Since FRBs tell us the exact time of mergers, a correlated search would significantly improve the effective sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors.
  • The growth rate of matter density perturbations has been measured from redshift-space distortion (RSD) in the galaxy power spectrum. We constrain the model parameter space for representative modified gravity models to explain the dark energy problem, by using the recent data of f_m(z)sigma_8(z) at the redshifts z = 0.06--0.8 measured by WiggleZ, SDSS LRG, BOSS, and 6dFGRS. We first test the Hu-Sawicki's f(R) dark energy model, and find that only the parameter region close to the standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter (Lambda-CDM) model is allowed (lambda > 12 and 5 for n = 1.5 and 2, respectively, at 95% CL). We then investigate the covariant Galileon model and show that the parameter space consistent with the background expansion history is excluded by the RSD data at more than 10 sigma because of the too large growth rate predicted by the theory. Finally, we consider the extended Galileon scenario, and we find that, in contrast to the covariant Galileon, there is a model parameter space for a tracker solution that is consistent with the RSD data within a 2 sigma level.