• In this article, inspired by Shi, et al. we investigate the optimal portfolio selection with one risk-free asset and one risky asset in a multiple period setting under cumulative prospect theory (CPT). Compared with their study, our novelty is that we consider a stochastic benchmark, and portfolio constraints. We test the sensitivity of the optimal CPT-investment strategies to different model parameters by performing a numerical analysis.
  • We study the Merton problem of optimal consumption-investment for the case of two investors sharing a final wealth. The typical example would be a husband and wife sharing a portfolio looking to optimize the expected utility of consumption and final wealth. Each agent has different utility function and discount factor. An explicit formulation for the optimal consumptions and portfolio can be obtained in the case of a complete market. The problem is shown to be equivalent to maximizing three different utilities separately with separate initial wealths. We study a numerical example where the market price of risk is assumed to be mean reverting, and provide insights on the influence of risk aversion or discount rates on the initial optimal allocation.
  • This work considers a stochastic model in which the uncertainty is driven by a multidimensional Brownian motion. The market price of risk process makes the transition between real world probability measure and risk neutral probability measure. Traditionally, the martingale representation formulas under the risk neutral probability measure requires the market price of risk process to be bounded. However, in several financial models the boundedness assumption of the market price of risk fails. One example is a stock price model with the market price of risk following an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. This work extends Clark-Haussmann formula to underlying stochastic processes which fail to satisfy the standard requirements. Our result can be applied to hedging and optimal investment in stock markets with unbounded market price of risk.
  • We prove that the Omega measure, which considers all moments when assessing portfolio performance, is equivalent to the widely used Sharpe ratio under jointly elliptic distributions of returns. Portfolio optimization of the Sharpe ratio is then explored, with an active-set algorithm presented for markets prohibiting short sales. When asymmetric returns are considered we show that the Omega measure and Sharpe ratio lead to different optimal portfolios.
  • The model of this paper gives a convenient strategy that a bank in the federal funds market can use in order to maximize its profit in a contemporaneous reserve requirement (CRR) regime. The reserve requirements are determined by the demand deposit process, modelled as a Brownian motion with drift. We propose a new model in which the cumulative funds purchases and sales are discounted at possible different rates. We formulate and solve the problem of finding the bank's optimal strategy. The model can be extended to involve the bank's asset size and we obtain that, under some conditions, the optimal upper barrier for fund sales is a linear function of the asset size. As a consequence, the bank net purchase amount is linear in the asset size.
  • We consider the problem of minimizing capital at risk in the Black-Scholes setting. The portfolio problem is studied given the possibility that a correlation constraint between the portfolio and a financial index is imposed. The optimal portfolio is obtained in closed form. The effects of the correlation constraint are explored; it turns out that this portfolio constraint leads to a more diversified portfolio.
  • In this paper, we propose an equilibrium pricing model in a dynamic multi-period stochastic framework with uncertain income streams. In an incomplete market, there exist two traded risky assets (e.g. stock/commodity and weather derivative) and a non-traded underlying (e.g. temperature). The risk preferences are of exponential (CARA) type with a stochastic coefficient of risk aversion. Both time consistent and time inconsistent trading strategies are considered. We obtain the equilibriums prices of a contingent claim written on the risky asset and non-traded underlying. By running numerical experiments we examine how the equilibriums prices vary in response to changes in model parameters.
  • This paper considers the portfolio management problem of optimal investment, consumption and life insurance. We are concerned with time inconsistency of optimal strategies. Natural assumptions, like different discount rates for consumption and life insurance, or a time varying aggregation rate lead to time inconsistency. As a consequence, the optimal strategies are not implementable. We focus on hyperbolic discounting, which has received much attention lately, especially in the area of behavioural finance. Following [10], we consider the resulting problem as a leader-follower game between successive selves, each of whom can commit for an infinitesimally small amount of time. We then define policies as subgame perfect equilibrium strategies. Policies are characterized by an integral equation which is shown to have a solution. Although we work on CRRA preference paradigm, our results can be extended for more general preferences as long as the equations admit solutions. Numerical simulations reveal that for the Merton problem with hyperbolic discounting, the consumption increases up to a certain time, after which it decreases; this pattern does not occur in the case of exponential discounting, and is therefore known in the litterature as the "consumption puzzle". Other numerical experiments explore the effect of time varying aggregation rate on the insurance premium.
  • In this paper, we investigate the Merton portfolio management problem in the context of non-exponential discounting. This gives rise to time-inconsistency of the decision-maker. If the decision-maker at time t=0 can commit his/her successors, he/she can choose the policy that is optimal from his/her point of view, and constrain the others to abide by it, although they do not see it as optimal for them. If there is no commitment mechanism, one must seek a subgame-perfect equilibrium strategy between the successive decision-makers. In the line of the earlier work by Ekeland and Lazrak we give a precise definition of equilibrium strategies in the context of the portfolio management problem, with finite horizon, we characterize it by a system of partial differential equations, and we show existence in the case when the utility is CRRA and the terminal time T is small. We also investigate the infinite-horizon case and we give two different explicit solutions in the case when the utility is CRRA (in contrast with the case of exponential discount, where there is only one). Some of our results are proved under the assumption that the discount function h(t) is a linear combination of two exponentials, or is the product of an exponential by a linear function.
  • We investigate the ergodic problem of growth-rate maximization under a class of risk constraints in the context of incomplete, It\^{o}-process models of financial markets with random ergodic coefficients. Including {\em value-at-risk} (VaR), {\em tail-value-at-risk} (TVaR), and {\em limited expected loss} (LEL), these constraints can be both wealth-dependent(relative) and wealth-independent (absolute). The optimal policy is shown to exist in an appropriate admissibility class, and can be obtained explicitly by uniform, state-dependent scaling down of the unconstrained (Merton) optimal portfolio. This implies that the risk-constrained wealth-growth optimizer locally behaves like a CRRA-investor, with the relative risk-aversion coefficient depending on the current values of the market coefficients.