• We present a Chandra study of the deeply embedded Serpens South star-forming region, examining cluster structure and disk properties at the earliest stages. In total, 152 X-ray sources are detected. Combined with Spitzer and 2MASS photometry, 66 X-ray sources are reliably matched to an IR counterpart. We identify 21 class I, 6 flat spectrum, 16 class II, and 18 class III young stars; 5 were unclassified. Eighteen sources were variable in X-rays, 8 exhibiting flare-like emission, and one periodic source. The cluster X-ray luminosity distance was estimated, the best match was to the nearer distance of 260pc for the front of the Aquila Rift complex. The $N_{H}$ vs. $A_{K}$ ratio is found to be $\sim$0.68x10$^{22}$, similar to that measured in other young low mass regions, but lower than that measured in the ISM and high mass clusters ($\sim$1.6-2x10$^{22}$). We find the spatial distribution closely follows that of the dense filament from which the stars have formed, with the class II population still strongly associated with the filament. There are four sub-clusters in the field, with three forming knots in the filament, and a fourth to the west, which may not be associated but may be contributing to the distributed class III population. A high percentage of diskless class IIIs (upper limit 30% of classified X-ray sources) in such a young cluster could indicate that processing of disks is influenced by the cluster environment and is not solely time-scale dependent.
  • We present a study of hierarchical structure in the Perseus molecular cloud, from the scale of the entire cloud ($\gtrsim$10 pc) to smaller clumps ($\sim$1 pc), cores ($\sim$0.05-0.1 pc), envelopes ($\sim$300-3000 AU) and protostellar objects ($\sim$15 AU). We use new observations from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) large project "Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES)" to probe the envelopes, and recent single-dish and interferometric observations from the literature for the remaining scales. This is the first study to analyze hierarchical structure over five scales in the same cloud complex. We compare the number of fragments with the number of Jeans masses in each scale to calculate the Jeans efficiency, or the ratio of observed to expected number of fragments. The velocity dispersion is assumed to arise either from purely thermal motions, or from combined thermal and non-thermal motions inferred from observed spectral line widths. For each scale, thermal Jeans fragmentation predicts more fragments than observed, corresponding to inefficient thermal Jeans fragmentation. For the smallest scale, thermal plus non-thermal Jeans fragmentation also predicts too many protostellar objects. However at each of the larger scales thermal plus non-thermal Jeans fragmentation predicts fewer than one fragment, corresponding to no fragmentation into envelopes, cores, and clumps. Over all scales, the results are inconsistent with complete Jeans fragmentation based on either thermal or thermal plus non-thermal motions. They are more nearly consistent with inefficient thermal Jeans fragmentation, where the thermal Jeans efficiency increases from the largest to the smallest scale.
  • We present intensity-corrected Herschel maps at 100 um, 160 um, 250 um, 350 um, and 500 um for 56 isolated low-mass clouds. We determine the zero-point corrections for Herschel PACS and SPIRE maps from the Herschel Science Archive (HSA) using Planck data. Since these HSA maps are small, we cannot correct them using typical methods. Here, we introduce a technique to measure the zero-point corrections for small Herschel maps. We use radial profiles to identify offsets between the observed HSA intensities and the expected intensities from Planck. Most clouds have reliable offset measurements with this technique. In addition, we find that roughly half of the clouds have underestimated HSA-SPIRE intensities in their outer envelopes relative to Planck, even though the HSA-SPIRE maps were previously zero-point corrected. Using our technique, we produce corrected Herschel intensity maps for all 56 clouds and determine their line-of-sight average dust temperatures and optical depths from modified black body fits. The clouds have typical temperatures of ~ 14-20 K and optical depths of ~ 1e-5 - 1e-3. Across the whole sample, we find an anti-correlation between temperature and optical depth. We also find lower temperatures than what was measured in previous Herschel studies, which subtracted out a background level from their intensity maps to circumvent the zero-point correction. Accurate Herschel observations of clouds are key to obtain accurate density and temperature profiles. To make such future analyses possible, intensity-corrected maps for all 56 clouds are publicly available in the electronic version.
  • Young stellar objects (YSOs) may undergo periods of active accretion (outbursts), during which the protostellar accretion rate is temporarily enhanced by a few orders of magnitude. Whether or not these accretion outburst YSOs possess similar dust/gas reservoirs to each other, and whether or not their dust/gas reservoirs are similar as quiescent YSOs, are issues not yet clarified. The aim of this work is to characterize the millimeter thermal dust emission properties of a statistically significant sample of long and short duration accretion outburst YSOs (i.e., FUors and EXors) and the spectroscopically identified candidates of accretion outbursting YSOs (i.e., FUor-like objects). We have carried out extensive Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations mostly at $\sim$225 GHz (1.33 mm) and $\sim$272 GHz (1.10 mm), from 2008 to 2017. We covered accretion outburst YSOs located at $<$1 kpc distances from the solar system. We analyze all the existing SMA data of such objects, both published and unpublished, in a coherent way to present a millimeter interferometric database of 29 objects. We obtained 21 detections at $>$3-$\sigma$ significance. Detected sources except for the two cases of V883 Ori and NGC 2071 MM3 were observed with $\sim$1$"$ angular resolution. Overall our observed targets show a systematically higher millimeter luminosity distribution than those of the $M_{*}>$0.3 $M_{\odot}$ Class II YSOs in the nearby ($\lesssim$400 pc) low-mass star-forming molecular clouds (e.g., Taurus, Lupus, Upp Scorpio, and Chameleon I). In addition, at 1 mm our observed confirmed binaries or triple-system sources are systematically fainter than the rest of the sources even though their 1 mm fluxes are broadly distributed. We may have detected $\sim$30-60\% millimeter flux variability from V2494 Cyg and V2495 Cyg, from the observations separated by $\sim$1 year.
  • We present new Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of CO(2-1) outflows toward young, embedded protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud as part of the Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES) survey. For 57 Perseus protostars, we characterize the orientation of the outflow angles and compare them with the orientation of the local filaments as derived from $Herschel$ observations. We find that the relative angles between outflows and filaments are inconsistent with purely parallel or purely perpendicular distributions. Instead, the observed distribution of outflow-filament angles are more consistent with either randomly aligned angles or a mix of projected parallel and perpendicular angles. A mix of parallel and perpendicular angles requires perpendicular alignment to be more common by a factor of $\sim$3. Our results show that the observed distributions probably hold regardless of the protostar's multiplicity, age, or the host core's opacity. These observations indicate that the angular momentum axis of a protostar may be independent of the large-scale structure. We discuss the significance of independent protostellar rotation axes in the general picture of filament-based star formation.
  • Context: Understanding how accretion proceeds is a key question of star formation, with important implications for both the physical and chemical evolution of young stellar objects. In particular, very little is known about the accretion variability in the earliest stages of star formation. Aims: To characterise protostellar accretion histories towards individual sources by utilising sublimation and freeze-out chemistry of CO. Methods: A sample of 24 embedded protostars are observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in context of the large program "Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA" (MASSES). The size of the C$^{18}$O emitting region, where CO has sublimated into the gas-phase, is measured towards each source and compared to the expected size of the region given the current luminosity. The SMA observations also include 1.3 mm continuum data, which are used to investigate whether a link can be established between accretion bursts and massive circumstellar disks. Results: Depending on the adopted sublimation temperature of the CO ice, between 20% and 50% of the sources in the sample show extended C$^{18}$O emission indicating that the gas was warm enough in the past that CO sublimated and is currently in the process of refreezing; something which we attribute to a recent accretion burst. Given the fraction of sources with extended C$^{18}$O emission, we estimate an average interval between bursts of 20000-50000 yr, which is consistent with previous estimates. No clear link can be established between the presence of circumstellar disks and accretion bursts, however the three closest known binaries in the sample (projected separations <20 AU) all show evidence of a past accretion burst, indicating that close binary interactions may also play a role in inducing accretion variability.
  • We present observations and analysis of the low-mass star-forming region, Taurus Molecular Cloud-1 (TMC-1). CS ($J$=2-1)/N$_2$H$^+$ ($J$=1-0) and C$^{17}$O ($J$=2-1)/C$^{18}$O ($J$=2-1) were observed with FCRAO (Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory) and SRAO (Seoul Radio Astronomy Observatory), respectively. In addition, Spitzer infrared data and 1.2 mm continuum data observed with MAMBO (Max-Planck Millimetre Bolometer) are used. We also perform chemical modeling to investigate the relative molecular distributions of the TMC-1 filament. Based on Spitzer observations, there is no young stellar object along the TMC-1 filament, while five Class II and one Class I young stellar objects are identified outside the filament. The comparison between column densities calculated from dust continuum and C$^{17}$O 2-1 line emission shows that CO is depleted much more significantly in the ammonia peak than in the cyanopolyyne peak, while the column densities calculated from the dust continuum are similar at the two peaks. N$_2$H$^+$ is not depleted much in either peak. According to our chemical calculation, the differential chemical distribution in the two peaks can be explained by different timescales required to reach the same density, i.e., by different dynamical processes.
  • Compact substructure is expected to arise in a starless core as mass becomes concentrated in the central region likely to form a protostar. Additionally, multiple peaks may form if fragmentation occurs. We present ALMA Cycle 2 observations of 60 starless and protostellar cores in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We detect eight compact substructures which are >15 arcsec from the nearest Spitzer YSO. Only one of these has strong evidence for being truly starless after considering ancillary data, e.g., from Herschel and X-ray telescopes. An additional extended emission structure has tentative evidence for starlessness. The number of our detections is consistent with estimates from a combination of synthetic observations of numerical simulations and analytical arguments. This result suggests that a similar ALMA study in the Chamaeleon I cloud, which detected no compact substructure in starless cores, may be due to the peculiar evolutionary state of cores in that cloud.
  • We present a catalog of low-mass dense cores observed with the SHARC-II instrument at 350 microns. Our observations have an effective angular resolution of 10", approximately 2.5 times higher than observations at the same wavelength obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, albeit with lower sensitivity, especially to extended emission. The catalog includes 81 maps covering a total of 164 detected sources. For each detected source, we tabulate basic source properties including position, peak intensity, flux density in fixed apertures, and radius. We examine the uncertainties in the pointing model applied to all SHARC-II data and conservatively find that the model corrections are good to within ~3", approximately 1/3 of the SHARC-II beam. We examine the differences between two array scan modes and find that the instrument calibration, beam size, and beam shape are similar between the two modes. We also show that the same flux densities are measured when sources are observed in the two different modes, indicating that there are no systematic effects introduced into our catalog by utilizing two different scan patterns during the course of taking observations. We find a detection rate of 95% for protostellar cores but only 45% for starless cores, and demonstrate the existence of a SHARC-II detection bias against all but the most massive and compact starless cores. Finally, we discuss the improvements in protostellar classification enabled by these 350 micron observations.
  • We present an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 106 GHz (Band 3) continuum survey of the complete population of dense cores in the Chamaeleon I molecular cloud. We detect a total of 24 continuum sources in 19 different target fields. All previously known Class 0 and Class I protostars in Chamaeleon I are detected, whereas all of the 56 starless cores in our sample are undetected. We show that the Spitzer+Herschel census of protostars in Chamaeleon I is complete, with the rate at which protostellar cores have been misclassified as starless cores calculated as <1/56, or < 2%. We use synthetic observations to show that starless cores collapsing following the turbulent fragmentation scenario are detectable by our ALMA observations when their central densities exceed ~10^8 cm^-3, with the exact density dependent on the viewing geometry. Bonnor-Ebert spheres, on the other hand, remain undetected to central densities at least as high as 10^10 cm^-3. Our starless core non-detections are used to infer that either the star formation rate is declining in Chamaeleon I and most of the starless cores are not collapsing, matching the findings of previous studies, or that the evolution of starless cores are more accurately described by models that develop less substructure than predicted by the turbulent fragmentation scenario, such as Bonnor-Ebert spheres. We outline future work necessary to distinguish between these two possibilities.
  • We investigate the alignment between outflow axes in nine of the youngest binary/multiple systems in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. These systems have typical member spacing larger than 1000 AU. For outflow identification, we use 12CO(2-1) and 12CO(3-2) data from a large survey with the Sub- millimeter Array: Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES). The distribution of outflow orientations in the binary pairs is consistent with random or preferentially anti-aligned distributions, demonstrating that these outflows are misaligned. This result suggests that these systems are possibly formed in environments where the distribution of angular momentum is complex and disordered, and these systems do not come from the same co-rotating structures or from an initial cloud with aligned vectors of angular momentum.
  • We present continuum and molecular line observations at 230 GHz and 345 GHz from the Sub-millimeter Array (SMA) toward three protostars in the Perseus L1448N region. The data are from the large project "Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA" (MASSES). Three dust continuum sources, Source B, Source NW, and Source A, are detected at both frequencies. These sources have corresponding emission peaks in C18O (J=2-1), 13CO (J=2-1), and HCO+ (J=4-3), and have offsets with N2D+ (J=3-2) peaks. High angular resolution data from a complimentary continuum survey with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array show that Source B is associated with three 8 mm continuum objects, Source NW with two, and Source A remains single. These results suggest that multiplicity in L1448N exists at different spatial scales from a few thousand AU to < 100 AU. Velocity gradients in each source obtained from two-dimensional fits to the SMA C18O emission are found to be perpendicular to within 20 degrees of the outflow directions as revealed by 12CO (J=2-1). We have observed that Sources B and NW with multiplicity have higher densities than Source A without multiplicity. This suggests that thermal Jeans fragmentation can be relevant in the fragmentation process. However, we have not observed a difference in the ratio between rotational and gravitational energy between sources with and without multiplicity. We also have not observed a trend between non-thermal velocity dispersions and the level of fragmentation. Our study has provided the first direct and comprehensive comparison between multiplicity and core properties in low-mass protostars, although based on small number statistics.
  • We present a CARMA 1.3 mm continuum survey toward 9 Class 0 protostars in the Perseus molecular cloud at $\sim$0.3$^{\prime\prime}$ (70 AU) resolution. This study approximately doubles the number of Class 0 protostars observed with spatial resolutions $<$ 100 AU at millimeter wavelengths, enabling the presence of protostellar disks and proto-binary systems to be probed. We detect flattened structures with radii $>$ 100 AU around 2 sources (L1448 IRS2 and Per-emb-14) and these sources may be strong disk candidates. Marginally-resolved structures with position angles within 30$^{\circ}$ of perpendicular to the outflow are found toward 3 protostars (L1448 IRS3C, IRAS 03282+3035, and L1448C) and are considered disk candidates. Two others (L1448 IRS3B and IRAS 03292+3039) have resolved structure, possibly indicative of massive inner envelopes or disks; L1448 IRS3B also has a companion separated by 0.9$^{\prime\prime}$ ($\sim$210 AU). IC348-MMS does not have well-resolved structure and the candidate first hydrostatic core L1451-MMS is marginally resolved on 1$^{\prime\prime}$ scales. The strong disk candidate sources were followed-up with C$^{18}$O ($J=2\rightarrow1$) observations, detecting velocity gradients consistent with rotation, but it is unclear if the rotation is Keplerian. We compare the observed visibility amplitudes to radiative transfer models, finding that visibility amplitude ratios suggest a compact component (possibly a disk) is necessary for 5 of 9 Class 0 sources; envelopes alone may explain the other 4 systems. We conclude that there is evidence for the formation of large disks in the Class 0 phase with a range of radii and masses dependent upon their initial formation conditions.
  • We present a multi-wavelength observational study of a low-mass star-forming region, L1251-C, with observational results at wavelengths from the near-infrared to the millimeter. Spitzer Space Telescope observations confirmed that IRAS 22343+7501 is a small group of protostellar objects. The extended emission to east-west direction with its intensity peak at the center of L1251A has been detected at 350 and 850 micron with the CSO and JCMT telescopes, tracing dense envelope materials around L1251A. The single-dish data from the KVN and TRAO telescopes show inconsistencies between the intensity peaks of several molecular line emission and that of the continuum emission, suggesting complex distributions of molecular abundances around L1251A. The SMA interferometer data, however, show intensity peaks of CO 2-1 and 13CO 2-1 located at the position of IRS 1, which is both the brightest source in IRAC image and the weakest source in the 1.3 mm dust continuum map. IRS 1 is the strongest candidate for the driving source of the newly detected compact CO 2-1 outflow. Over the whole region (14' by 14') of L125l-C, 3 Class I and 16 Class II sources have been detected, including three YSOs in L1251A. A comparison with the average projected distance among 19 YSOs in L1251-C and that among 3 YSOs in L1251A suggests L1251-C is an example of low-mass cluster formation, where protostellar objects are forming in a small group.
  • A fundamental question about the early evolution of low-mass protostars is when circumstellar disks may form. High angular resolution observations of molecular transitions in the (sub)millimeter wavelength windows make it possible to investigate the kinematics of the gas around newly-formed stars, for example to identify the presence of rotation and infall. IRAS 16293-2422 was observed with the extended Submillimeter Array (eSMA) resulting in subarcsecond resolution (0.46" x 0.29", i.e. $\sim$ 55 $\times$ 35~AU) images of compact emission from the C$^{17}$O (3-2) and C$^{34}$S (7-6) transitions at 337~GHz (0.89~mm). To recover the more extended emission we have combined the eSMA data with SMA observations of the same molecules. The emission of C$^{17}$O (3-2) and C$^{34}$S (7-6) both show a velocity gradient oriented along a northeast-southwest direction with respect to the continuum marking the location of one of the components of the binary, IRAS16293A. Our combined eSMA and SMA observations show that the velocity field on the 50--400~AU scales is consistent with a rotating structure. It cannot be explained by simple Keplerian rotation around a single point mass but rather needs to take into account the enclosed envelope mass at the radii where the observed lines are excited. We suggest that IRAS 16293-2422 could be among the best candidates to observe a pseudo-disk with future high angular resolution observations.
  • We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70 and 160 micron observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 sq-deg with IRAC and 10.47 sq-deg with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkHalpha 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the fraction of YSOs in the region with disks relative to an estimate of the diskless YSO population. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15 - 20 times fewer stars.
  • We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 um dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.5 arcsec, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64+/-0.08 and 0.91+/-0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I YSOs, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among MS stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50+/-0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I YSOs (0.31+/-0.07) and MS stars (< 0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary systems shows a general trend in which companion star fraction increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67%+/-8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation.
  • One puzzle in understanding how stars form in clusters is the source of mass -- is all of the mass in place before the first stars are born, or is there an extended period when the cluster accretes material which can continuously fuel the star formation process? We use a multi-line spectral survey of the southern filament associated with the Serpens South embedded cluster-forming region in order to determine if mass is accreting from the filament onto the cluster, and whether the accretion rate is significant. Our analysis suggests that material is flowing along the filament's long axis at a rate of ~30Msol/Myr (inferred from the N2H+ velocity gradient along the filament), and radially contracting onto the filament at ~130Msol/Myr (inferred from HNC self-absorption). These accretion rates are sufficient to supply mass to the central cluster at a similar rate to the current star formation rate in the cluster. Filamentary accretion flows may therefore be very important in the ongoing evolution of this cluster.
  • We have mapped the Auriga/California molecular cloud with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE cameras and the Bolocam 1.1 mm camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) with the eventual goal of quantifying the star formation and cloud structure in this Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) that is comparable in size and mass to the Orion GMC, but which appears to be forming far fewer stars. We have tabulated 60 compact 70/160um sources that are likely pre-main-sequence objects and correlated those with Spitzer and WISE mid-IR sources. At 1.1 mm we find 18 cold, compact sources and discuss their properties. The most important result from this part of our study is that we find a modest number of additional compact young objects beyond those identified at shorter wavelengths with Spitzer. We also describe the dust column density and temperature structure derived from our photometric maps. The column density peaks at a few x 10^22 cm^-2 (N_H2) and is distributed in a clear filamentary structure along which nearly all the pre-main-sequence objects are found. We compare the YSO surface density to the gas column density and find a strong non-linear correlation between them. The dust temperature in the densest parts of the filaments drops to ~10K from values ~ 14--15K in the low density parts of the cloud. We also derive the cumulative mass fraction and probability density function of material in the cloud which we compare with similar data on other star-forming clouds.
  • Glycolaldehyde (HCOCH2OH) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. In this paper we present the first detection of 13 transitions of glycolaldehyde around a solar-type young star, through Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 at 220 GHz (6 transitions) and 690 GHz (7 transitions). The glycolaldehyde lines have their origin in warm (200-300 K) gas close to the individual components of the binary. Glycolaldehyde co-exists with its isomer, methyl formate (HCOOCH3), which is a factor 10-15 more abundant toward the two sources. The data also show a tentative detection of ethylene glycol, the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde. In the 690 GHz data, the seven transitions predicted to have the highest optical depths based on modeling of the 220 GHz lines all show red-shifted absorption profiles toward one of the components in the binary (IRAS16293B) indicative of infall and emission at the systemic velocity offset from this by about 0.2" (25 AU). We discuss the constraints on the chemical formation of glycolaldehyde and other organic species - in particular, in the context of laboratory experiments of photochemistry of methanol-containing ices. The relative abundances appear to be consistent with UV photochemistry of a CH3OH-CO mixed ice that has undergone mild heating. The order of magnitude increase in line density in these early ALMA data illustrate its huge potential to reveal the full chemical complexity associated with the formation of solar system analogs.
  • We present 230 GHz Submillimeter Array continuum and molecular line observations of the newly discovered FUor candidate HBC722. We report the detection of seven 1.3 mm continuum sources in the vicinity of HBC722, none of which correspond to HBC722 itself. We compile infrared and submillimeter continuum photometry of each source from previous studies and conclude that three are Class 0 embedded protostars, one is a Class I embedded protostar, one is a Class I/II transition object, and two are either starless cores or very young, very low luminosity protostars or first hydrostatic cores. We detect a northwest-southeast outflow, consistent with the previous detection of such an outflow in low-resolution, single-dish observations, and note that its axis may be precessing. We show that this outflow is centered on and driven by one of the nearby Class 0 sources rather than HBC722, and find no conclusive evidence that HBC722 itself is driving an outflow. The non-detection of HBC722 in the 1.3 mm continuum observations suggests an upper limit of 0.02 solar masses for the mass of the circumstellar disk. This limit is consistent with typical T Tauri disks and with a disk that provides sufficient mass to power the burst.
  • We present high spatial (<300 AU) and spectral (0.07 km/s) resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the dense starless cluster core Oph A-N6, in the 1 mm dust continuum and the 3-2 line of N2H+ and N2D+. The dust continuum observations reveal a compact source not seen in single-dish observations, of size ~1000 AU and mass 0.005-0.01 M\odot. The combined line and single-dish observations reveal a core of size 3000 \times 1400 AU elongated in a NW-SE direction, with almost no variation in either line width or line center velocity across the map, and very small non-thermal motions. The deuterium fraction has a peak value of ~0.15 and is >0.05 over much of the core. The N2H+ column density profile across the major axis of Oph A-N6 is well represented by an isothermal cylinder, with temperature 20 K, peak density 7.1 \times 10^6 cm^{-3}, and N2H+ abundance 2.7 \times 10^{-10}. The mass of Oph A-N6 is estimated to be 0.29 M\odot, compared to a value of 0.18 M\odot from the isothermal cylinder analysis, and 0.63 M\odot for the critical mass for fragmentation of an isothermal cylinder. Compared to isolated low-mass cores, Oph A-N6 shows similar narrow line widths and small velocity variation, with a deuterium fraction similar to "evolved" dense cores. It is significantly smaller than isolated cores, with larger peak column and volume density. The available evidence suggests Oph A-N6 has formed through the fragmentation of the Oph A filament and is the precursor to a low-mass star. The dust continuum emission suggests it may already have begun to form a star.
  • It remains a key challenge to establish the molecular content of different components of low-mass protostars, like their envelopes and disks, and how this depends on the evolutionary stage and/or environment of the young stars. Observations at submillimeter wavelengths provide a direct possibility to study the chemical composition of low-mass protostars through transitions probing temperatures up to a few hundred K in the gas surrounding these sources. This paper presents a large molecular line survey of the deeply embedded protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) - including images of individual lines down to approximately 1.5-3" (190-380 AU) resolution. More than 500 individual transitions are identified related to 54 molecular species (including isotopologues) probing temperatures up to about 550 K. Strong chemical differences are found between the two components in the protostellar system with a separation between, in particular, the sulfur- and nitrogen-bearing species and oxygen-bearing complex organics. The action of protostellar outflow on the ambient envelope material is seen in images of CO and SiO and appear to influence a number of other species, including (deuterated) water, HDO. The effects of cold gas-phase chemistry is directly imaged through maps of CO, N2D+ and DCO+, showing enhancements of first DCO+ and subsequently N2D+ in the outer envelope where CO freezes-out on dust grains.
  • We present new 230 GHz Submillimeter Array observations of the candidate first hydrostatic core Per-Bolo 58. We report the detection of a 1.3 mm continuum source and a bipolar molecular outflow, both centered on the position of the candidate first hydrostatic core. The continuum detection has a total flux density of 26.6 +/- 4.0 mJy, from which we calculate a total (gas and dust) mass of 0.11 +/- 0.05 Msun and a mean number density of 2.0 +/- 1.6 X 10^7 cm-3. There is some evidence for the existence of an unresolved component in the continuum detection, but longer-baseline observations are required in order to confirm the presence of this component and determine whether its origin lies in a circumstellar disk or in the dense inner envelope. The bipolar molecular outflow is observed along a nearly due east-west axis. The outflow is slow (characteristic velocity of 2.9 km/s), shows a jet-like morphology (opening semi-angles ~8 degrees for both lobes), and extends to the edges of the primary beam. We calculate the kinematic and dynamic properties of the outflow in the standard manner and compare them to several other protostars and candidate first hydrostatic cores with similarly low luminosities. We discuss the evidence both in support of and against the possibility that Per-Bolo 58 is a first hydrostatic core, and we outline future work needed to further evaluate the evolutionary status of this object.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC and MIPS observations of a 0.85 deg^2 field including the Corona Australis (CrA) star-forming region. At a distance of 130 pc, CrA is one of the closest regions known to be actively forming stars, particularly within its embedded association, the Coronet. Using the Spitzer data, we identify 51 young stellar objects (YSOs) in CrA which include sources in the well-studied Coronet cluster as well as distributed throughout the molecular cloud. Twelve of the YSOs discussed are new candidates, one of which is located in the Coronet. Known YSOs retrieved from the literature are also added to the list, and a total of 116 candidate YSOs in CrA are compiled. Based on these YSO candidates, the star formation rate is computed to be 12 M_o Myr^-1, similar to that of the Lupus clouds. A clustering analysis was also performed, finding that the main cluster core, consisting of 68 members, is elongated (having an aspect ratio of 2.36), with a circular radius of 0.59 pc and mean surface density of 150 pc^-2. In addition, we analyze outflows and jets in CrA by means of new CO and H_2 data. We present 1.3 mm interferometric continuum observations made with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) covering R CrA, IRS 5, IRS 7, and IRAS 18595-3712 (IRAS 32). We also present multi-epoch H_2 maps and detect jets and outflows, study their proper motions, and identify exciting sources. The Spitzer and ISAAC/VLT observations of IRAS 32 show a bipolar precessing jet, which drives a CO (2-1) outflow detected in the SMA observations. There is also clear evidence for a parsec-scale precessing outflow, E-W oriented, and originating in the SMA 2 region, likely driven by SMA 2 or IRS 7A.