• Inclusion of heavy metal atoms in a polymer backbone allows transitions between the singlet and triplet manifolds. Interfacial dissociation of triplet excitons constitutes a viable mechanism for enhancing photovoltaic (PV) efficiencies in polymer heterojunction-based solar cells. The PV efficiency from polymer solar cells utilizing a ladder-type poly (para-phenylene) polymer (PhLPPP) with trace quantity of Pd atoms and a fullerene derivative (PCBM) is much higher than its counterpart (MeLPPP) with no Pd atom. Evidence is presented for the formation of a weak ground-state charge-transfer complex (CTC) in the blended films of the polymer and PCBM, using photo-induced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy. The CTC state in MeLPPP:PCBM has a singlet character to it, resulting in a radiative recombination. In contrast, the CTC states in PhLPPP:PCBM are more localized with a triplet character. An absorption peak at 1.65 eV is observed in PhLPPP:PCBM blend in the PIA, which may be converted to weakly-bound polaron-pairs, contributing to the enhancement of PV efficiency.
  • Ethyl-hexyl substituted polyfluorene (PF) with its high level of molecular disorder can be described very well by one-carrier space-charge-limited conduction for a discrete set of trap levels with energy $\sim$ 0.5 eV above the valence band edge. Sweeping the bias above the trap-filling limit in the as-is polymer generates a new set of exponential traps, which is clearly seen in the density of states calculations. The trapped charges in the new set of traps have very long lifetimes and can be detrapped by photoexcitation. Thermal cycling the PF film to a crystalline phase prevents creation of additional traps at higher voltages.
  • We present a non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study at the carbon K-edge on aligned poly[9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-fluorene-2,7-diyl] and show that the x-ray Raman scattering technique can be used as a practical alternative to x-ray absorption measurements. We demonstrate that this novel method can be applied to studies on aligned $\pi$-conjugated polymers complementing diffraction and optical studies. Combining the experimental data and a very recently proposed theoretical scheme we demonstrate a unique property of x-ray Raman scattering by performing the symmetry decomposition on the density of unoccupied electronic states into $s$- and $p$-type symmetry contributions.
  • We explore the possibility that hyperfine interaction causes the recently discovered organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) effect. Our study employs both experiment and theoretical modelling. An excitonic pair mechanism model based on hyperfine interaction, previously suggested by others to explain magnetic field effects in organics, is examined. Whereas this model can explain a few key aspects of the experimental data, we, however, uncover several fundamental contradictions as well. By varying the injection efficiency for minority carriers in the devices, we show experimentally that OMAR is only weakly dependent on the ratio between excitons formed and carriers injected, likely excluding any excitonic effect as the origin of OMAR.
  • We present studies of the photoluminescence (PL), absorption and Raman scattering from poly[2,7-(9,9'-bis(2-ethylhexyl))fluorene] under hydrostatic pressures of 0-100 kbar at room temperature. The well-defined PL and associated vibronics that are observed at atmospheric pressure change dramatically around 20 kbar in the bulk sample and at around 35 kbar for the thin film sample. Beyond these pressures the PL emission from the backbone is swamped by strong peaks due to aggregates and keto defects in the 2.1-2.6 eV region. The Raman peaks shift to higher energies and exhibit unexpected antiresonance lineshapes at higher pressures, indicating a strong electron-phonon interaction.
  • We present photoluminescence studies as a function of temperature from a series of conjugated polymers and a conjugated molecule with distinctly different backbone conformations. The organic materials investigated here are: planar methylated ladder type poly para-phenylene, semi-planar polyfluorene, and non-planar para hexaphenyl. In the longer-chain polymers the photoluminescence transition energies blue shift with increasing temperatures. The conjugated molecules, on the other hand, red shift their transition energies with increasing temperatures. Empirical models that explain the temperature dependence of the band gap energies in inorganic semiconductors can be extended to explain the temperature dependence of the transition energies in conjugated molecules.