• We present simultaneous optical and near-infrared (IR) photometry of the millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 during its low-mass X-ray binary phase. The r'- and K_s-band light curves show rectangular, flat-bottomed dips, similar to the X-ray mode-switching (active-passive state transitions) behaviour observed previously. The cross-correlation function (CCF) of the optical and near-IR data reveals a strong, broad negative anti-correlation at negative lags, a broad positive correlation at positive lags, with a strong, positive narrow correlation superimposed. The shape of the CCF resembles the CCF of black hole X-ray binaries but the time-scales are different. The features can be explained by reprocessing and a hot accretion flow close to the neutron star's magnetospheric radius. The optical emission is dominated by the reprocessed component, whereas the near-IR emission contains the emission from plasmoids in the hot accretion flow and a reprocessed component. The rapid active-passive state transition occurs when the hot accretion flow material is channelled onto the neutron star and is expelled from its magnetosphere. During the transition the optical reprocessing component decreases resulting in the removal of a blue spectral component. The accretion of clumpy material through the magnetic barrier of the neutron star produces the observed near-IR/optical CCF and variability. The dip at negative lags corresponds to the suppression of the near-IR synchrotron component in the hot flow, whereas the broad positive correlation at positive lags is driven by the increased synchrotron emission of the outflowing plasmoids. The narrow peak in the CCF is due to the delayed reprocessed component, enhanced by the increased X-ray emission.
  • We present a detailed X-ray spectral study of the quasar PG 1211+143 based on Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observations collected in a multi-wavelength campaign with UV data using the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST-COS) and radio bands using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We constructed a multi-wavelength ionizing spectral energy distribution using these observations and archival infrared data to create XSTAR photoionization models specific to the PG 1211+143 flux behavior during the epoch of our observations. Our analysis of the Chandra-HETGS spectra yields complex absorption lines from H-like and He-like ions of Ne, Mg and Si which confirm the presence of an ultra-fast outflow (UFO) with a velocity ~ $-$17,300 km s$^{-1}$ (outflow redshift $z_{\rm out}$ ~ $-$0.0561) in the rest frame of PG 1211+143. This absorber is well described by an ionization parameter $\log \xi$ ~ 2.9 erg s$^{-1}$ cm and column density $\log N_{\rm H}$ ~ 21.5 cm$^{-2}$. This corresponds to a stable region of the absorber's thermal stability curve, and furthermore its implied neutral hydrogen column is broadly consistent with a broad Ly$\alpha$ absorption line at a mean outflow velocity of ~ $-$16,980 km s$^{-1}$ detected by our HST-COS observations. Our findings represent the first simultaneous detection of a UFO in both X-ray and UV observations. Our VLA observations provide evidence for an active jet in PG 1211+143, which may be connected to the X-ray and UV outflows; this possibility can be evaluated using very-long-baseline interferometric (VLBI) observations.
  • We model and analyse the secular evolution of stellar bars in spinning dark matter (DM) haloes with the cosmological spin lambda ~ 0 -- 0.09. Using high-resolution stellar and DM numerical simulations, we focus on angular momentum exchange between stellar discs and DM haloes of various axisymmetric shapes --- spherical, oblate and prolate. We find that stellar bars experience a diverse evolution which is guided by the ability of parent haloes to absorb angular momentum lost by the disc through the action of gravitational torques, resonant and non-resonant. We confirm the previous claim that dynamical bar instability is accelerated via resonant angular momentum transfer to the halo. Our main findings relate to the long-term, secular evolution of disc-halo systems: with an increasing lambda, bars experience less growth and dissolve after they pass through the vertical buckling instability. Specifically, with an increasing halo spin, (1) The vertical buckling instability in stellar bars colludes with inability of the inner halo to absorb angular momentum --- this emerges as the main factor weakening or destroying bars in spinning haloes; (2) Bars lose progressively less angular momentum, and their pattern speeds level off; (3) Bars are smaller, and for lambda >= 0.06 cease their growth completely following buckling; (4) Bars in lambda > 0.03 haloes have ratio of corotation-to-bar radii, R_CR / R_b > 2, and represent so-called slow bars which do not show offset dust lanes. We provide a quantitative analysis of angular momentum transfer in disc-halo systems, and explain the reasons for absence of growth in fast spinning haloes and its observational corollaries. We conclude that stellar bar evolution is substantially more complex than anticipated, and bars are not as resilient as has been considered so far.
  • We present optical and near-IR Integral Field Unit (IFU) and ALMA band 6 observations of the nearby dual Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) Mrk 463. At a distance of 210 Mpc, and a nuclear separation of $\sim$4 kpc, Mrk 463 is an excellent laboratory to study the gas dynamics, star formation processes and supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion in a late-stage gas-rich major galaxy merger. The IFU observations reveal a complex morphology, including tidal tails, star-forming clumps, and emission line regions. The optical data, which map the full extent of the merger, show evidence for a biconical outflow and material outflowing at $>$600 km s$^{-1}$, both associated with the Mrk 463E nucleus, together with large scale gradients likely related to the ongoing galaxy merger. We further find an emission line region $\sim$11 kpc south of Mrk 463E that is consistent with being photoionized by an AGN. Compared to the current AGN luminosity, the energy budget of the cloud implies a luminosity drop in Mrk 463E by a factor 3-20 over the last 40,000 years. The ALMA observations of $^{12}$CO(2-1) and adjacent 1mm continuum reveal the presence of $\sim$10$^{9}$M$_\odot$ in molecular gas in the system. The molecular gas shows velocity gradients of $\sim$800 km/s and $\sim$400 km/s around the Mrk 463E and 463W nuclei, respectively. We conclude that in this system the infall of $\sim$100s $M_\odot$/yr of molecular gas is in rough balance with the removal of ionized gas by a biconical outflow being fueled by a relatively small, $<$0.01% of accretion onto each SMBH.
  • Inelastic neutron scattering instruments require very low background; therefore the proper shielding for suppressing the scattered neutron background, both from elastic and inelastic scattering is essential. The detailed understanding of the background scattering sources is required for effective suppression. The Multi-Grid thermal neutron detector is an Ar/CO$_{2}$ gas filled detector with a $^{10}$B$_{4}$C neutron converter coated on aluminium substrates. It is a large-area detector design that will equip inelastic neutron spectrometers at the European Spallation Source (ESS). To this end a parameterised Geant4 model is built for the Multi-Grid detector. This is the first time thermal neutron scattering background sources have been modelled in a detailed simulation of detector response. The model is validated via comparison with measured data of prototypes installed on the IN6 instrument at ILL and on the CNCS instrument at SNS. The effect of scattering originating in detector components is smaller than effects originating elsewhere.
  • Sulphur-bearing volatiles are observed to be significantly depleted in interstellar and circumstellar regions. This missing sulphur is postulated to be mostly locked up in refractory form. With ALMA we have detected sulphur monoxide (SO), a known shock tracer, in the HD 100546 protoplanetary disk. Two rotational transitions: $J=7_{7}-6_{6}$ (301.286 GHz) and $J=7_8-6_7$ (304.078 GHz) are detected in their respective integrated intensity maps. The stacking of these transitions results in a clear 5$\sigma$ detection in the stacked line profile. The emission is compact but is spectrally resolved and the line profile has two components. One component peaks at the source velocity and the other is blue-shifted by 5 km s$^{-1}$. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the SO emission are not consistent with that expected from a purely Keplerian disk. We detect additional blue-shifted emission that we attribute to a disk wind. The disk component was simulated using LIME and a physical disk structure. The disk emission is asymmetric and best fit by a wedge of emission in the north east region of the disk coincident with a `hot-spot' observed in the CO $J=3-2$ line. The favoured hypothesis is that a possible inner disk warp (seen in CO emission) directly exposes the north-east side of the disk to heating by the central star, creating locally the conditions to launch a disk wind. Chemical models of a disk wind will help to elucidate why the wind is particularly highlighted in SO emission and whether a refractory source of sulphur is needed. An alternative explanation is that the SO is tracing an accretion shock from a circumplanetary disk associated with the proposed protoplanet embedded in the disk at 50 au. We also report a non-detection of SO in the protoplanetary disk around HD 97048.
  • We present results for the renormalization of gauge invariant nonlocal fermion operators which contain a Wilson line, to one loop level in lattice perturbation theory. Our calculations have been performed for Wilson/clover fermions and a wide class of Symanzik improved gluon actions. The extended nature of such `long-link' operators results in a nontrivial renormalization, including contributions which diverge linearly as well as logarithmically with the lattice spacing, along with additional finite factors. We present nonperturbative prescriptions to extract the linearly divergent contributions.
  • We present a photometric $J$-band variability study of GU Psc b, a T3.5 co-moving planetary-mass companion (9-13$M_{\rm{Jup}}$) to a young ($\sim$150 Myr) M3 member of the AB Doradus Moving Group. The large separation between GU Psc b and its host star (42") provides a rare opportunity to study the photometric variability of a planetary-mass companion. The study presented here is based on observations obtained from 2013 to 2014 over three nights with durations of 5-6 hr each with the WIRCam imager at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Photometric variability with a peak-to-peak amplitude of $4\pm1$% at a timescale of $\sim$6 hr was marginally detected on 2014 October 11. No high-significance variability was detected on 2013 December 22 and 2014 October 10. The amplitude and timescale of the variability seen here, as well as its evolving nature, is comparable to what was observed for a variety of field T dwarfs and suggests that mechanisms invoked to explain brown dwarf variability may be applicable to low-gravity objects such as GU Psc b. Rotation-induced photometric variability due to the formation and dissipation of atmospheric features such as clouds is a plausible hypothesis for the tentative variation detected here. Additional photometric measurements, particularly on longer timescales, will be required to confirm and characterize the variability of GU Psc b, determine its periodicity and to potentially measure its rotation period.
  • With an eye toward the precision physics of the LHC, such as the recent measurement of $M_W$ by the ATLAS Collaboration, we present here systematic studies relevant to the assessment of the expected size of multiple photon radiative effects in heavy gauge boson production with decay to charged lepton pairs. We use the new version 4.22 of ${\cal KK}$MC-hh so that we have CEEX EW exact ${\cal O}(\alpha^2 L)$ corrections in a hadronic MC and control over the corresponding EW initial-final interference (IFI) effects as well. In this way, we illustrate the interplay between cuts of the type used in the measurement of $M_W$ at the LHC and the sizes of the expected responses of the attendant higher order corrections. We find that there are per cent to per mille level effects in the initial-state radiation, fractional per mille level effects in the IFI and per mille level effects in the over-all ${\cal O}(\alpha^2 L)$ corrections that any treatment of EW corrections at the per mille level should consider. Our results have direct applicability to current LHC experimental data analyses.
  • We report on the detection of three strong HI absorbers originating in the outskirts (i.e., impact parameter, $\rho_{\rm cl} \approx (1.6-4.7) r_{500}$) of three massive ($M_{500}\sim3\times10^{14} M_{\odot}$) clusters of galaxies at redshift $z_{\rm cl} \approx 0.46$, in the $Hubble Space Telescope$ Cosmic Origins Spectrograph ($HST$/COS) spectra of 3 background UV-bright quasars. These clusters were discovered by the 2500 deg$^2$ South Pole Telescope Sunyaev$-$Zel'dovich (SZ) effect survey. All three COS spectra show partial Lyman limit absorber with $N(HI) > 10^{16.5} \ \rm cm^{-2}$ near the photometric redshifts ($|\Delta z/(1+z)| \approx 0.03$) of the clusters. The compound probability of random occurrence of all three absorbers is $<0.02$%, indicating that the absorbers are most likely related to the targeted clusters. We find that the outskirts of these SZ-selected clusters are remarkably rich in cool gas compared to existing observations of other clusters in the literature. The effective Doppler parameters of the Lyman series lines, obtained using single cloud curve-of-growth (COG) analysis, suggest a non-thermal/turbulent velocity of a few $\times10 \ \rm km s^{-1}$ in the absorbing gas. We emphasize the need for uniform galaxy surveys around these fields and for more UV observations of QSO-cluster pairs in general in order to improve the statistics and gain further insights into the unexplored territory of the largest collapsed cosmic structures.
  • This thesis describes a study to perform change detection on Very High Resolution satellite images using image fusion based on 2D Discrete Wavelet Transform and Fuzzy C-Means clustering algorithm. Multiple other methods are also quantitatively and qualitatively compared in this study.
  • We report on the X-ray monitoring programme (covering slightly more than 11 days) carried out jointly by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR on the intermediate Seyfert galaxy Mrk 915. The light curves extracted in different energy ranges show a variation in intensity but not a significant change in spectral shape. The X-ray spectra reveal the presence of a two-phase warm absorber: a fully covering mildly ionized structure [log xi/(erg cm/s)~2.3, NH~1.3x10^21 cm-2] and a partial covering (~90 per cent) lower ionized one [log xi/(erg cm/s)~0.6, NH~2x10^22 cm-2]. A reflection component from distant matter is also present. Finally, a high-column density (NH~1.5x10^23 cm-2) distribution of neutral matter covering a small fraction of the central region is observed, almost constant, in all observations. Main driver of the variations observed between the datasets is a decrease in the intrinsic emission by a factor of ~1.5. Slight variations in the partial covering ionized absorber are detected, while the data are consistent with no variation of the total covering absorber. The most likely interpretation of the present data locates this complex absorber closer to the central source than the narrow line region, possibly in the broad line region, in the innermost part of the torus, or in between. The neutral obscurer may either be part of this same stratified structure or associated with the walls of the torus, grazed by (and partially intercepting) the line of sight.
  • We report new spectroscopic observations obtained with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System of 308 red giants (RGs) located in two fields near the photometric center of the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud. This sample consists of 131 stars observed in previous studies (in one field) and 177 newly-observed stars (in the second field) selected specifically to more reliably establish the metallicity and age distributions of the bar. For each star, we measure its heliocentric line-of-sight velocity, surface gravity and metallicity from its high-resolution spectrum (effective temperatures come from photometric colors). The spectroscopic Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams---modulo small offsets in surface gravities---reveal good agreement with model isochrones. The mean metallicity of the 177-RG sample is $\rm [Fe/H]=-0.76\pm0.02$ with a metallicity dispersion $\sigma=0.28\pm0.03$. The corresponding metallicity distribution---corrected for selection effects---is well fitted by two Gaussian components: one metal-rich with a mean $-0.66\pm0.02$ and a standard deviation $0.17\pm0.01$, and the other metal-poor with $-1.20\pm0.24$ and $0.41\pm0.06$. The metal-rich and metal-poor populations contain approximately 85% and 15% of stars, respectively. We also confirm the velocity dispersion in the bar center decreases significantly from $31.2\pm4.3$ to $18.7\pm1.9$ km s$^{-1}$ with increasing metallicity over the range $-2.09$ to $-0.38$. Individual stellar masses are estimated using the spectroscopic surface gravities and the known luminosities. We find that lower mass hence older RGs have larger metallicity dispersion and lower mean metallicity than the higher-mass, younger RGs. The estimated masses, however, extend to implausibly low values ($\rm \sim 0.1~M_{\odot}$) making it impossible to obtain an absolute age-metallicity or age distribution of the bar.
  • We report the first molecular line survey of Supernova 1987A in the millimetre wavelength range. In the ALMA 210--300 and 340--360 GHz spectra, we detected cold (20--170 K) CO, 28SiO, HCO+ and SO, with weaker lines of 29SiO from ejecta. This is the first identification of HCO+ and SO in a young supernova remnant. We find a dip in the J=6--5 and 5--4 SiO line profiles, suggesting that the ejecta morphology is likely elongated. The difference of the CO and SiO line profiles is consistent with hydrodynamic simulations, which show that Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities cause mixing of gas, with heavier elements much more disturbed, making more elongated structure. We obtained isotopologue ratios of 28SiO/29SiO>13, 28SiO/30SiO>14, and 12CO/13CO>21, with the most likely limits of 28SiO/29SiO>128, 28SiO/30SiO>189. Low 29Si and 30Si abundances in SN 1987A are consistent with nucleosynthesis models that show inefficient formation of neutron-rich isotopes in a low metallicity environment, such as the Large Magellanic Cloud. The deduced large mass of HCO+ (~5x10^-6 Msun) and small SiS mass (<6x10^-5 Msun) might be explained by some mixing of elements immediately after the explosion. The mixing might have caused some hydrogen from the envelope to sink into carbon and oxygen-rich zones after the explosion, enabling the formation of a substantial mass of HCO+. Oxygen atoms may have penetrated into silicon and sulphur zones, suppressing formation of SiS. Our ALMA observations open up a new window to investigate chemistry, dynamics and explosive-nucleosynthesis in supernovae.
  • Recent data on the transverse single spin asymmetry $A_N$ measured by the STAR Collaboration for $p^\uparrow \, p \to W^\pm/Z^0 \, X$ reactions at RHIC allow the first investigation of the Sivers function in Drell-Yan processes and of its expected sign change with respect to SIDIS processes. A new extraction of the Sivers functions from the latest SIDIS data is performed and a critical assessment of the significance of the STAR data is attempted.
  • At very-high energies (100 TeV - 1 PeV), the small value of Bjorken-x ($\le10^{-3}-10^{-7}$) at which the parton distribution functions are evaluated makes the calculation of charm quark production very difficult. The charm quark has mass ($\sim$1.5$\pm$0.2 GeV) significantly above the $\Lambda$$_{QCD}$ scale ($\sim$200 MeV), and therefore its production is perturbatively calculable. However, the uncertainty in the data and the calculations cannot exclude some smaller non-perturbative contribution. To evaluate the prompt neutrino flux, one needs to know the charm production cross-section in pN -> c$\bar{c}$ X, and hadronization of charm particles. This contribution briefly discusses computation of prompt neutrino flux and presents the strongest limit on prompt neutrino flux from IceCube.
  • We present an improvement of the MC event generator Herwiri2, where we recall the latter MC was a prototype for the inclusion of CEEX resummed EW corrections in hadron-hadron scattering at high cms energies. In this improvement the new exact ${\cal O}(\alpha^2L)$ resummed EW generator ${\cal{KK}}$ MC 4.22, featuring as it does the CEEX realization of resummation in the EW sector, is put in union with the Herwig parton shower environment. The {\rm LHE} format of the attendant output event file means that all other conventional parton shower environments are available to the would-be user of the resulting new MC. For this reason (and others -- see the text) we henceforth refer to the new improvement of the Herwiri2 MC as ${\cal{KK}}\text{MC-hh}$. Since this new MC features exact ${\cal O}(\alpha)$ pure weak corrections from the DIZET EW library and features the CEEX and the EEX YFS-style resummation of large multiple photon effects, it provides already the concrete path to 0.05\% precision on such effects if we focus on the EW effects themselves. We therefore show predictions for observable distributions and comparisons with other approaches in the literature. This MC represents an important step in the realization of the exact amplitude-based $QED\otimes QCD$ resummation paradigm. Independently of this latter observation, the MC rigorously quantifies important EW effects in the current LHC experiments.
  • In strontium titanate, the Froehlich electron - LO-phonon interaction dominates the electron response and can also provide superconductivity. Because of high LO-phonon frequencies in SrTiO3, the superconducting system is non-adiabatic. We demonstrate that the dielectric function approach is an adequate theoretical method for superconductivity in SrTiO3 and on the SrTiO3-LaAlO3 interface. The critical temperatures are calculated using realistic material parameters. The obtained critical temperatures are in line with experimental data both for bulk and interface superconductivity. The present method explains the observed multi-dome shape of the critical temperature in SrTiO3 as a function of the electron concentration due to multiband superconductivity.
  • We obtained adaptive-optics assisted SINFONI observations of the central regions of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC5419 with a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec ($\approx 55$ pc). NGC5419 has a large depleted stellar core with a radius of 1.58 arcsec (430 pc). HST and SINFONI images show a point source located at the galaxy's photocentre, which is likely associated with the low-luminosity AGN previously detected in NGC5419. Both the HST and SINFONI images also show a second nucleus, off-centred by 0.25 arcsec ($\approx 70$ pc). Outside of the central double nucleus, we measure an almost constant velocity dispersion of $\sigma \sim 350$ km/s. In the region where the double nucleus is located, the dispersion rises steeply to a peak value of $\sim 420$ km/s. In addition to the SINFONI data, we also obtained stellar kinematics at larger radii from the South African Large Telescope. While NGC5419 shows low rotation ($v < 50$ km/s), the central regions (inside $\sim 4 \, r_b$) clearly rotate in the opposite direction to the galaxy's outer parts. We use orbit-based dynamical models to measure the black hole mass of NGC5419 from the kinematical data outside of the double nuclear structure. The models imply M$_{\rm BH}=7.2^{+2.7}_{-1.9} \times 10^9$ M$_{\odot}$. The enhanced velocity dispersion in the region of the double nucleus suggests that NGC5419 possibly hosts two supermassive black holes at its centre, separated by only $\approx 70$ pc. Yet our measured M$_{\rm BH}$ is consistent with the black hole mass expected from the size of the galaxy's depleted stellar core. This suggests, that systematic uncertainties in M$_{\rm BH}$ related to the secondary nucleus are small.
  • Cerenkov technology is often the optimal choice for particle identification in high energy particle collision applications. Typically, the most challenging regime is at high pseudorapidity (forward) where particle identification must perform well at high high laboratory momenta. For the upcoming Electron Ion Collider (EIC), the physics goals require hadron ($\pi$, K, p) identification up to $\sim$~50 GeV/c. In this region Cerenkov Ring-Imaging is the most viable solution.\newline The speed of light in a radiator medium is inversely proportional to the refractive index. Hence, for PID reaching out to high momenta a small index of refraction is required. Unfortunately, the lowest indices of refraction also result in the lowest light yield ($\frac{dN_\gamma}{dx} \propto \sin^2{\left(\theta_C \right)}$) driving up the radiator length and thereby the overall detector cost. In this paper we report on a successful test of a compact RICH detector (1 meter radiator) capable of delivering in excess of 10 photoelectrons per ring with a low index radiator gas ($CF_4$). The detector concept is a natural extension of the PHENIX HBD detector achieved by adding focusing capability at low wavelength and adequate gain for high efficiency detection of single-electron induced avalanches. Our results indicate that this technology is indeed a viable choice in the forward direction of the EIC. The setup and results are described within.
  • We present deep imaging of the most distant dwarf discovered by the Dark Energy Survey, Eridanus II (Eri II). Our Magellan/Megacam stellar photometry reaches $\sim$$3$ mag deeper than previous work, and allows us to confirm the presence of a stellar cluster whose position is consistent with Eri II's center. This makes Eri II, at $M_V=-7.1$, the least luminous galaxy known to host a (possibly central) cluster. The cluster is partially resolved, and at $M_V=-3.5$ it accounts for $\sim$$4\%$ of Eri II's luminosity. We derive updated structural parameters for Eri II, which has a half-light radius of $\sim$$280$ pc and is elongated ($\epsilon$$\sim$$0.48$), at a measured distance of $D$$\sim$$370$ kpc. The color-magnitude diagram displays a blue, extended horizontal branch, as well as a less populated red horizontal branch. A central concentration of stars brighter than the old main sequence turnoff hints at a possible intermediate-age ($\sim$$3$ Gyr) population; alternatively, these sources could be blue straggler stars. A deep Green Bank Telescope observation of Eri II reveals no associated atomic gas.
  • We present recent developments in the application of exact amplitude-based resummation methods in the confrontation between precision theory and recent experimental results. As a consequence, we argue that these methods open the way to 1\% total theoretical precision in LHC and FCC physics when realized via MC event generators.
  • We present an overview on the current experimental and phenomenological status of transverse single spin asymmetries (tSSAs) in proton-proton collisions. In particular, we focus on large-$p_T$ inclusive pion, photon, jet, pion-jet production and Drell-Yan processes. For all of them theoretical estimates are given in terms of a generalised parton model (GPM) based on a transverse momentum dependent (TMD) factorisation scheme. Comparisons with the corresponding results in a collinear twist-3 formalism and in a modified GPM approach are also made. On the experimental side, a selection of the most interesting and recent results from RHIC is presented.
  • In this paper we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of solar system bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings, and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun-Earth Lagrange-point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a by-product of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.
  • The role of radiative cooling during the evolution of a bow shock was studied in laboratory-astrophysics experiments that are scalable to bow shocks present in jets from young stellar objects. The laboratory bow shock is formed during the collision of two counter-streaming, supersonic plasma jets produced by an opposing pair of radial foil Z-pinches driven by the current pulse from the MAGPIE pulsed-power generator. The jets have different flow velocities in the laboratory frame and the experiments are driven over many times the characteristic cooling time-scale. The initially smooth bow shock rapidly develops small-scale non-uniformities over temporal and spatial scales that are consistent with a thermal instability triggered by strong radiative cooling in the shock. The growth of these perturbations eventually results in a global fragmentation of the bow shock front. The formation of a thermal instability is supported by analysis of the plasma cooling function calculated for the experimental conditions with the radiative packages ABAKO/RAPCAL.