• We consider Bayesian inference for stochastic differential equation mixed effects models (SDEMEMs) exemplifying tumor response to treatment and regrowth in mice. We produce an extensive study on how a SDEMEM can be fitted using both exact inference based on pseudo-marginal MCMC and approximate inference via Bayesian synthetic likelihoods (BSL). We investigate a two-compartments SDEMEM, these corresponding to the fractions of tumor cells killed by and survived to a treatment, respectively. Case study data considers a tumor xenography study with two treatment groups and one control, each containing 5-8 mice. Results from the case study and from simulations indicate that the SDEMEM is able to reproduce the observed growth patterns and that BSL is a robust tool for inference in SDEMEMs. Finally, we compare the fit of the SDEMEM to a similar ordinary differential equation model. Due to small sample sizes, strong prior information is needed to identify all model parameters in the SDEMEM and it cannot be determined which of the two models is the better in terms of predicting tumor growth curves. In a simulation study we find that with a sample of 17 mice per group BSL is able to identify all model parameters and distinguish treatment groups.
  • A maximum likelihood methodology for the parameters of models with an intractable likelihood is introduced. We produce a likelihood-free version of the stochastic approximation expectation-maximization (SAEM) algorithm to maximize the likelihood function of model parameters. While SAEM is best suited for models having a tractable "complete likelihood" function, its application to moderately complex models is a difficult or even impossible task. We show how to construct a likelihood-free version of SAEM by using the "synthetic likelihood" paradigm. Our method is completely plug-and-play, requires almost no tuning and can be applied to both static and dynamic models. Four simulation studies illustrate the method, including a stochastic differential equation model, a stochastic Lotka-Volterra model and data from $g$-and-$k$ distributions. MATLAB code is available as supplementary material.
  • We study the class of state-space models and perform maximum likelihood estimation for the model parameters. We consider a stochastic approximation expectation-maximization (SAEM) algorithm to maximize the likelihood function with the novelty of using approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) within SAEM. The task is to provide each iteration of SAEM with a filtered state of the system, and this is achieved using an ABC sampler for the hidden state, based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methodology. It is shown that the resulting SAEM-ABC algorithm can be calibrated to return accurate inference, and in some situations it can outperform a version of SAEM incorporating the bootstrap filter. Two simulation studies are presented, first a nonlinear Gaussian state-space model then a state-space model having dynamics expressed by a stochastic differential equation. Comparisons with iterated filtering for maximum likelihood inference, and Gibbs sampling and particle marginal methods for Bayesian inference are presented.
  • A maximum likelihood methodology for a general class of models is presented, using an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) approach. The typical target of ABC methods are models with intractable likelihoods, and we combine an ABC-MCMC sampler with so-called "data cloning" for maximum likelihood estimation. Accuracy of ABC methods relies on the use of a small threshold value for comparing simulations from the model and observed data. The proposed methodology shows how to use large threshold values, while the number of data-clones is increased to ease convergence towards an approximate maximum likelihood estimate. We show how to exploit the methodology to reduce the number of iterations of a standard ABC-MCMC algorithm and therefore reduce the computational effort, while obtaining reasonable point estimates. Simulation studies show the good performance of our approach on models with intractable likelihoods such as g-and-k distributions, stochastic differential equations and state-space models.
  • In recent years dynamical modelling has been provided with a range of breakthrough methods to perform exact Bayesian inference. However it is often computationally unfeasible to apply exact statistical methodologies in the context of large datasets and complex models. This paper considers a nonlinear stochastic differential equation model observed with correlated measurement errors and an application to protein folding modelling. An Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) MCMC algorithm is suggested to allow inference for model parameters within reasonable time constraints. The ABC algorithm uses simulations of "subsamples" from the assumed data generating model as well as a so-called "early rejection" strategy to speed up computations in the ABC-MCMC sampler. Using a considerate amount of subsamples does not seem to degrade the quality of the inferential results for the considered applications. A simulation study is conducted to compare our strategy with exact Bayesian inference, the latter resulting two orders of magnitude slower than ABC-MCMC for the considered setup. Finally the ABC algorithm is applied to a large size protein data. The suggested methodology is fairly general and not limited to the exemplified model and data.
  • Models defined by stochastic differential equations (SDEs) allow for the representation of random variability in dynamical systems. The relevance of this class of models is growing in many applied research areas and is already a standard tool to model e.g. financial, neuronal and population growth dynamics. However inference for multidimensional SDE models is still very challenging, both computationally and theoretically. Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) allow to perform Bayesian inference for models which are sufficiently complex that the likelihood function is either analytically unavailable or computationally prohibitive to evaluate. A computationally efficient ABC-MCMC algorithm is proposed, halving the running time in our simulations. Focus is on the case where the SDE describes latent dynamics in state-space models; however the methodology is not limited to the state-space framework. Simulation studies for a pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics model and for stochastic chemical reactions are considered and a MATLAB package implementing our ABC-MCMC algorithm is provided.
  • Stochastic differential equations (SDEs) are established tools to model physical phenomena whose dynamics are affected by random noise. By estimating parameters of an SDE intrinsic randomness of a system around its drift can be identified and separated from the drift itself. When it is of interest to model dynamics within a given population, i.e. to model simultaneously the performance of several experiments or subjects, mixed-effects modelling allows for the distinction of between and within experiment variability. A framework to model dynamics within a population using SDEs is proposed, representing simultaneously several sources of variation: variability between experiments using a mixed-effects approach and stochasticity in the individual dynamics using SDEs. These "stochastic differential mixed-effects models" have applications in e.g. pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and biomedical modelling. A parameter estimation method is proposed and computational guidelines for an efficient implementation are given. Finally the method is evaluated using simulations from standard models like the two-dimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) and the square root models.